chinaculture <![CDATA[It's no mystery why 'blind box' collectible market is on the rise]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/30/content_1488036.htm

Visitors look at mystery boxes at the Elefun Pop Art and Toy Show held at Nan Fung International Convention and Exhibition Center in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, on Dec 20. [Photo by Li Zhihao/For China Daily]

Zhuang Chuxian, 26, remembers her first Sonny Angel doll mystery boxŚQćin which she received one of the cherub-like figurines with a bobbing head and dressed like a sheep.

Over the past five years, she has collected more than 30 of the figurines, from various series.

"I like the way how they are perfectly arranged on my desk and windowsill. They bring out the inner child in me," she says.

Whether studying abroad or traveling, Zhuang will always carry that original sheep-themed doll "like a good companion".

It's a simple yet surprising concept, buyers do not know which model they will receive until they unpack the box, and it is "the variable reward" that provides an added dose of fun to the experience. Some may get a highly sought-after doll, while some may notŚQćit's the luck of the draw.

Mystery boxes, or "blind boxes", can be traced back to Japan's capsule toys and lucky bags, while in China, the concept is quickly gaining popularity among Generation Z-ers, or those born in the mid-90s and early 2000s.

According to a report published by MobTech, a data intelligence technology platform, female white-collar workers and Generation Z college students in first-tier cities are primary consumers of mystery boxes, with female buyers accounting for 62.6 percent.

The report estimated the country's mystery box market to exceed 30 billion yuan ($4.59 billion) by 2024.

The boom in the segment has been certified by another report from e-commerce giant Alibaba's Tmall platform, which shows that the collection of figurines has overtaken fancy shoes and esports as the most popular hobby among consumers born after 1995.

About 200,000 consumers spent more than 20,000 yuan in the past year on mystery boxes on Tmall, the report noted.

Priced between 49 yuan and about 100 yuan, the boxes play into the philosophy made famous in the film Forrest Gump that "life is like a box of chocolates and you never know what you're gonna get", but at a relatively low price, according to psychologists and social observers.

Thanks to rising prosperity in China, millennials pay more attention to a product's "emotional value" than its practical functions, says Wei Wenqi, an associate professor of psychology at South China Normal University.

Without delay or deferment, consumers can get instant gratification by buying a mystery box, he adds, noting that the "hidden surprise" in the boxes induces a sense of fulfillment.

Many respondents said they feel it is one of the easiest ways to increase their happiness and a medium for social contact, as collectors can either exchange their identical figurines or trade them on the secondhand market.

"In the information age as people become more distant from one another, mystery boxes help them make friends with people who share similar interests and find a sense of belonging," Wei says.

However, experts warn about the dangers of addiction and overconsumption, especially for teenagers.

"We can pay for joy, but not for impulse," Wei says, advising parents and authorities to pay more heed to the sector.

Xinhua

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2020-12-30 09:50:44
<![CDATA[More Chinese seeking leisure experiences, report says]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/29/content_1488023.htm

People visit Nanjing's Laomendong area, a historical quarter with old buildings and stores selling traditional handicrafts and snacks. [Photo by Xu Congjun/For China Daily]

Chinese spend an average of 4.9 hours online for leisure, according to the Green Book of China's Leisure unveiled in Beijing in early December.

Those born in the 1970s and '80s typically spend one to three hours a day on relaxation, while most people born after the 2000s use five to eight hours.

The internet's rapid development has brought about more possibilities for leisure, enabling the public to use fragmented time to relax by socializing, watching videos, livestreaming, playing games and engaging in virtual travel.

It has also expanded access to leisure among people of different areas, ages, incomes and educational backgrounds, says the book compiled by the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences' Tourism Research Center, which examines the country's leisure-industry development from policy, market and urban perspectives.

Chinese spend an average of 5,647 yuan ($865.12) per capita on leisure.

Livestreaming has witnessed explosive growth in consumer numbers and satisfies needs for leisure, especially during the pandemic.

The number of livestream consumers had reached 560 million as of March 2020, accounting for 62 percent of all Chinese internet users, the book says. In particular, e-commerce livestreaming had 265 million consumers.

Tourism has increasingly contributed to high-quality public leisure, the book points out.

In 2019, the domestic tourism market received 6 billion tourist visits, up 8.4 percent over the previous year. Outbound tourist numbers reached 154.63 million last year, up 3.3 percent over 2018.

Visitors enjoy leisure at the cafe by the swimming pool at the renovated Columbia Circle in Shanghai, a popular leisure spot in the city with retail stores, restaurants and cafes. [Photo by Chen Yuyu/For China Daily]

The country has seen continuous cultural and tourism integration, and a rich supply of leisure products, the book says.

Beijing, Tianjin and Guangdong and Shaanxi provinces have each launched 2020-22 plans to accelerate the integration of culture and tourism to enrich leisure experiences.

In May 2020, the Ministry of Culture and Tourism proposed more flexible and practical methods to evaluate leisure-supply systems that lean toward smart tourism and can upgrade experiences.

Support will also be given to nightlife culture and the tourism economy.

Last year, the State Council proposed encouraging qualified scenic spots to offer night tours. By 2022, the country is expected to build more than 200 national clusters for nightlife culture and tourism consumption.

The ongoing national park development is also expected to boost leisure. The National Forestry and Grassland Administration has reviewed 10 candidate parks and is expected to publish a short list soon.

Chinese have shown an increasing awareness of the importance of leisure and spend more time on it, according to a survey conducted by the Tourism Research Center this year.

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2020-12-29 11:36:49
<![CDATA[Hot for cold]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/29/content_1488019.htm

The Silk Road International Ski Resort in Urumqi in the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region sees a large number of visitors on Nov 26. [Photo provided to China Daily]

A growing number of Chinese are enjoying winter experiences, especially skiing, this season, Yang Feiyue reports.

Domestic travelers are seeking wintertime activities, such as skiing, especially since COVID-19 has restricted outbound excursions.

Ski-themed tour bookings surged by more than 350 percent since November as compared with the same period last year, Trip.com Group reports.

Tickets for winter activities in northern China have seen explosive growth, the online travel agency reports.

Changbai Mountain in Jilin province, Yabuli ski resort in Heilongjiang province and Zhangjiakou in Hebei province are among the most popular destinations this season.

Kanas in the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region and Hulun Buir in the Inner Mongolia autonomous region are also luring more skiers.

Alibaba's travel portal, Fliggy, tracked a 300 percent surge in searches for destinations in the country's northeastern provinces and a 110 percent increase in winter-product bookings during the Nov 11 Singles Day online shopping spree, which started on Nov 1, the agency's data show.

Many ski resorts opened to the public in early November because of the early snow this year. Some began pre-sales in August.

"The ski market is indeed very hot," says Zhang Xuguang, a manager with Genting Resort Secret Garden in Zhangjiakou, the city that will cohost some events during the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics.

The number of skiers visiting the garden has grown by 196 percent as compared with the same period of last year, Zhang says.

"We've clearly seen more people who've begun to ski," he says.

The ski resort realized 9.4 million yuan ($1.4 million) in sales during the Singles Day promotion.

Twenty-eight ski resorts were built in 2019, bringing the total number to 770 nationwide, according to the 2019 China Ski Industry White Paper by Beijing Ski Association official Wu Bin.

Ski-resort visits reached 20.9 million last season, up 6 percent over the same period of 2017-18, the paper says.

China's hosting of the 2022 Winter Olympics and the country's efforts in boosting winter tourism have played a positive role in increasing the number of visits, experts say.


Shenyang Guaipo International Ski Field has its first group of skiers on Nov 24, the resort's opening day for the winter season. [Photo provided to China Daily]

In September 2018, the General Administration of Sport released an outline, which aimed to engage 300 million Chinese in winter sports by 2022 and thus better prepare for the Olympics. Winter-related industries are expected to reach 1 trillion yuan in value by 2025, according to the administration's development plan.

The country is anticipating a boom in ice-and-snow tourism ahead of the 2022 Winter Olympics, says a China Tourism Academy report issued early this year. China received 224 million tourists from home and abroad during the winter season from late 2018 to early 2019, a 13.7 percent increase compared with the previous period.

Winter-tourism revenue reached 386 billion yuan during the same period, a 17 percent year-on-year increase, according to the report.

Major winter destinations have rolled out special packages to woo travelers.

Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei kicked off a joint winter-tourism promotion in mid-December. The event aimed to integrate winter-tourism resources and boost winter sports and culture to pave the way for the country's hosting of the 2022 Games.

The three destinations focused on innovation and rolled out winter experiences that feature culture, tourism, sports and technology across the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region.

Northeastern Beijing's Miyun district has developed skiing, sightseeing, health-preservation, homestay, gourmet-food and shopping experiences for winter vacationers.

"We will combine winter resources, rural tourism and sports events this year," says Miyun's publicity department head Ge Junkai.

Pinggu district in the capital's northeast has prepared organic-vegetable picking, flower-blossom sightseeing with a focus on chrysanthemums and fairs to enable visitors to experience local life in addition to winter sports.

Tianjin has prepared winter carnivals and ski competitions, while Hebei's Chengde city has developed 18 winter routes, integrating royal-family history, hot springs, folk customs and shopping.

China's northernmost province, Heilongjiang, has publicized 15 winter-tourism destinations and launched a series of events featuring art, sightseeing, hiking, fishing, hot springs, folk customs, culture and performances.

More than 400 cultural and recreational activities are planned in the provincial capital, Harbin, and the city's government will distribute 48 million yuan in subsidies on online platforms. Some hot spots, such as the Harbin Ice and Snow World, will offer discounted tickets.

Yabuli ski resort is allowing travelers to use three of its major runs with a single pass.

Travelers in Heilongjiang's Mohe can also enjoy forest-train rides and night skiing in Xuexiang village, as well as water-splashing performances, international cross-country auto races, hot springs and hotpot.

Neighboring Jilin province has rolled out new tourism products and favorable policies. Since mid-November, a 100-day winter tourism festival has been running in the provincial capital, Changchun, where visitors can experience 100 winter activities, including marathons, large ice sculptures and a gourmet-food exhibition.


Children buy snacks at a food stall at a ski resort in Beijing's Miyun district, which has developed skiing, sightseeing, health-preservation, homestay, gourmet-food and shopping experiences for winter vacationers. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Changchun's government plans to offer 7 million yuan worth of coupons to boost consumption during the festival. The city's major ski facilities, including Tianding and Miaoxiang mountain resorts, offer visitors more than 40 ski tracks, covering more than 1 square kilometer.

Travelers can feast their eyes on the stunning rime, a special type of frost resembling granular tufts of ice, in the province's second-biggest city, Jilin.

The high-speed railway linking Beijing and Zhangjiakou's Chongli district has placed world-class ski experiences less than an hour away from the capital.

The tourism train connecting Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei that began running in mid-November has brought more access to the region's wintertime offerings.

Visitors can enjoy the convenience of Jilin city's recently opened bus service that connects Changchun Longjia International Airport with major scenic spots like Songhua Lake and Beidahu ski resort.

Still, experts are calling for more attention to safety and the sustainability of the domestic ski market.

Zhou Mingqi, founder of the T-identifier Think Tank that focuses on the culture and tourism industries, says that although the domestic ski market is developing rapidly, it's still less mature than developed countries'.

Many domestic travelers ski out of curiosity, rather than a habit or lifestyle.

Consequently, service providers need to offer more pertinent and quality products for skiers of various levels and come up with ways to keep customers engaged, Zhou says.

Zhang, from Genting Resort Secret Garden, says he has faith in China's improving ski market but believes there's still room for relevant infrastructure and service providers to improve.

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2020-12-29 09:26:03
<![CDATA[Iconic work]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/29/content_1488017.htm

The Year of the Rooster stamp designed by Shao Bolin and Lyu Shengzhong. [Photo provided to China Daily]

An exhibition celebrates the contributions of a nonagenarian former designer and his associates to China's postage stamps, Lin Qi reports. 

A chilly winter day might not be the best for an elderly reunion. But for two esteemed artists, Shao Bolin, 90, and Jin Shangyi, 86, such a meeting is of great value to relive the excitement of a collaboration that happened more than three decades ago.

Jin joined Shao for a retrospective exhibition on the latter at the China National Post and Postage Stamp Museum in Beijing on Dec 20.

Shao is a retired chief designer of China Post. The exhibition paid tribute to his career spanning decades, with dozens of iconic postage stamps he designed or co-designed with Jin and other artists on show.


Two stamps designed by Shao Bolin feature the 2,000-year-old silk paintings unearthed in Chenjiadashan, Hunan province. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The display included one stamp issued in 1986 to commemorate the 120th anniversary of the birth of Sun Yat-sen, the Chinese revolutionary leader, which Shao co-designed with Jin.

Seeing the stamp and its design draft on show evoked in the two artists the memory of another cold winter day in 1985. Shao paid a visit to Jin, inviting the oil painter, who was famed for making realistic portraits, to work on a new stamp.

Both graduated from the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing in the early 1950s. Jin spent months back then to complete an oil painting which depicts Sun against a riverside landscape of Guangzhou. He says that, in the work, Sun's black suit corresponds with the accumulating gray clouds over the city to deliver a solemn revolutionary atmosphere.


A set of stamps featuring archaic Chinese bronzes Shao designs on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Shao then added elegant decorative patterns and a black background outside the portrait centered on the design. The stamp was the first of its kind to feature an oil-painting portrait on Chinese postage stamps. It was thereafter hailed as the "best stamp of the year".

Shao says he respects Jin, who overcame cold weather and other difficulties to create "a historic piece of work".

He says Jin received 500 yuan for the portrait at the time which sounds "unbelievable", given that Jin's paintings sell for hundreds of thousands to millions of yuan today in the art market.

Shao worked with prominent painter Huang Yongyu, 96, to issue the golden monkey stamp in 1980.That year, China Post began to issue specially designed stamps featuring each of the 12 animals in the Chinese zodiac to celebrate Chinese New Year. The first piece of the zodiac rotation was the Year of the Monkey stamp.


Shao designs a stamp featuring the Zeng Houyi Chime Bells which he couples with a record of the sound of the archaic musical instruments. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Shao reached out to Huang, a friend who taught at the Central Academy of Fine Arts for years, to co-create the design. The stamp, which was on show at the Beijing exhibition, became iconic and is sought after by those into philately even today.

After Shao was appointed the chief designer in 1985, he took a reformative initiative to regularly collaborate with artists on stamps. Also, the success of the golden monkey stamp ignited great interest in artists when they were approached by Shao for commissions.

The exhibition included a Year of the Rooster stamp issued in 1981 and painted by Zhang Ding, the late artist and Tsinghua University professor; a Year of the Snake stamp in 1989, created by Lyu Shengzhong, a professor at the Central Academy of Fine Arts; and a set of four stamps in 1986 which depicts ancient Chinese sports events and was designed by Zhou Jingxin, a leading painter in Nanjing, Jiangsu province.


Jin Shangyi poses with a portrait of Sun Yat-sen he painted for the stamp. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

These stamps that Shao and his colleagues co-created with artists greatly diversified the look of Chinese postage stamps.

Shao views his designs as important "moving museums" to showcase China's rich history and culture.

One such example is a stamp issued in 1987 to introduce the stunning Marquis Yi of Zeng chime bells. The set of bronze bells of various sizes and striking different tones was cast more than 2,400 years ago and excavated with hundreds of other objects from a tomb in Suizhou, Hubei province, in 1978.

Shao was assigned to design a special stamp featuring the bronze bells. He recalls he and a photographer arrived at the Hubei Provincial Museum in Wuhan in 1986, where the bells were housed, to take a photo of them, and "it was the second time the whole set of bells was shown for photo-taking after being unearthed".


Stamp designer Shao Bolin (right) and oil painter Jin Shangyi visit Shao's retrospective exhibition in Beijing. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

"Because there was not a suitable studio, the bells were transported to a military base nearby and placed in an open-air auditorium. We began to take photos early at night, and the set was heavily guarded by soldiers."

A sound engineer also went with Shao to record the sounds of the archaic bells. "When we were to record, we heard toads in a lake nearby croaking loudly. We had to stop, and waited until midnight when the toads stopped making sound."

A record of a Tang Dynasty (618-907) song played with the chime bells was included in the stamp kit, allowing collectors to appreciate the stamp while enjoying the profound sound of a musical instrument made centuries ago.

The photo, the stamp and the small record of the archaic bells were all on show at the exhibition.


A stamp commemorates the 120th anniversary of the birth of Sun Yat-sen which Shao Bolin co-worked with Jin Shangyi. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Shao invited painter Zhou Jingxin to co-design a set of four stamps themed on ancient Chinese sports events. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A Year of Snake stamp issued in 1989 which Shao and artist Lyu Shengzhong co-worked on. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-29 08:08:22
<![CDATA[Art show to open at Hainan museum]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/28/content_1488015.htm

A work by Kedgar Volta. [Photo provided to China Daily]

More than 140 artworks by artists from across the world will be on show in The Tides of the Century exhibit, which will open at Feb 8 at the Ocean Flower Island Museum in Danzhou, South China's Hainan province, diversifying the art landscape of the island province famed for its natural landscape and tourism.

The exhibition will gather works by a lineup of internationally acclaimed artists, including Marc Quinn, Xu Bing, Tatsuo Miyajima and Leandro Erlich, whose works have been introduced to the home audience. Other artists on show will make their debut in China, such as Gabriel Dawe from Mexico, who was commissioned to create a work for the exhibition.


A work by Sui Jianguo. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The exhibition will include a section showing works that six Chinese artists will make during residence at the museum, centering on issues that include protection of the marine environment and consumption behavior.

Another highlight of the exhibition will be a review of contemporary art in Greece, which is slated to be the guest-of-honor country at the exhibition. This part will feature works created since the 1970s by some 20 Greek artists,  to conduct a dialog with the audience about the history and cultural traditions of the East and the West, and to look to the future.


A work by Xu Bing. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Chess Continuum, a work by Aemilia Papaphilippou. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Horizons, a work by Costas Varotsos. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Invisible Places- The Vast White, a work by Marianna Strapatsaki. [Photo provided to China Daily]


LUMA, a work by Park Lisa. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Nike, a work by Theo Triantafyllidia. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Rainbow, a work by Gabriel Dawe. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Tel-Neant, a work by George Zongolopoulos. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-28 16:19:54
<![CDATA[Tsinghua exhibition an artistic snapshot of globalization]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/28/content_1488014.htm

A Snapshot of Globalization, an ongoing exhibition at the Tsinghua University Art Museum until March 12, shows a selection of artworks in Cheng Xindong's extensive collection. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Eminent gallerist and collector Cheng Xindong is one of the first-generation sponsors of Chinese contemporary art who has introduced homegrown artists to the world and international artists to the home audience. His endeavors and assembly of art vividly reflect the globalization of Chinese art over the past three decades.

A Snapshot of Globalization, an ongoing exhibition at the Tsinghua University Art Museum until March 12, shows a selection of artworks in Cheng's extensive collection. On display are paintings, sculptures, installations, photos and videos by a lineup of leading contemporary artists from more than 10 countries.

It gives a review of the multi-faceted development of contemporary Chinese art that has marched to establish a distinguished vocabulary of its own while under the influence of world art. Also, the exhibition features international artworks to give a glimpse of how globalization influences the creation of artists across the world.


A Snapshot of Globalization, an ongoing exhibition at the Tsinghua University Art Museum until March 12, shows a selection of artworks in Cheng Xindong's extensive collection. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A Snapshot of Globalization, an ongoing exhibition at the Tsinghua University Art Museum until March 12, shows a selection of artworks in Cheng Xindong's extensive collection. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A Snapshot of Globalization, an ongoing exhibition at the Tsinghua University Art Museum until March 12, shows a selection of artworks in Cheng Xindong's extensive collection. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A Snapshot of Globalization, an ongoing exhibition at the Tsinghua University Art Museum until March 12, shows a selection of artworks in Cheng Xindong's extensive collection. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A Snapshot of Globalization, an ongoing exhibition at the Tsinghua University Art Museum until March 12, shows a selection of artworks in Cheng Xindong's extensive collection. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A Snapshot of Globalization, an ongoing exhibition at the Tsinghua University Art Museum until March 12, shows a selection of artworks in Cheng Xindong's extensive collection. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Opened House, a work by French artist Daniel Buren on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The Most Beautiful, a work by Cubian artist Manuel Mendive on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-28 16:13:12
<![CDATA[Paintings and calligraphy on show to hail 'Mother River']]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/28/content_1488013.htm

An exhibition now on at the National Art Museum of China until Jan 3 shows nearly 100 artworks tracing Zhoukou's past and unfolding a panoramic view of its present. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

The city of Zhoukou, situated in the floodplain between the Yellow River and Huaihe River in Central China's Henan province, boasts a long history and was one of the earliest hubs of Chinese civilization.

An exhibition now on at the National Art Museum of China until Jan 3 shows nearly 100 artworks tracing Zhoukou's past and unfolds a panoramic view of its present.

Paintings and calligraphic works on display hail the city's traditions and cultural accumulations. They spotlight its natural landscapes and important figures over the past century. And they introduce its urban development, through which one can anticipate the future of the central area along the Yellow River.


An exhibition now on at the National Art Museum of China until Jan 3 shows nearly 100 artworks tracing Zhoukou's past and unfolding a panoramic view of its present. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


An exhibition now on at the National Art Museum of China until Jan 3 shows nearly 100 artworks tracing Zhoukou's past and unfolding a panoramic view of its present. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


An exhibition now on at the National Art Museum of China until Jan 3 shows nearly 100 artworks tracing Zhoukou's past and unfolding a panoramic view of its present. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


An exhibition now on at the National Art Museum of China until Jan 3 shows nearly 100 artworks tracing Zhoukou's past and unfolding a panoramic view of its present. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


An exhibition now on at the National Art Museum of China until Jan 3 shows nearly 100 artworks tracing Zhoukou's past and unfolding a panoramic view of its present. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

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2020-12-28 16:08:59
<![CDATA[Woman artist's glass works reflect people's inner side]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/28/content_1488012.htm

Cat in the corner (fall) No. 1 [Photo provided to China Daily]

"Deep in the inner side of every person there lives another self ... which is like a shimmering light, quiet and gentle," said Beijing-based artist Du Meng.

Du's glass works, which are now on show at her solo exhibition, Shimmer, in Beijing's Cabana space, create an intimate, serene atmosphere in which visitors can feel the soft spot in their heart being touched.

At the center of the exhibition, which runs through Feb 7, are two series of works. The Shimmer series depicts two girls who look distant and deeply immersed in a secluded world of their own. 

In another series of works, Annealing, Du was inspired by the heating and slow cooling process of glassmaking, and shows the beauty of not only the fragile material but also the persistence required for handicrafts.


Cat in the corner (spring) No. 1 [Photo provided to China Daily]


Cat in the corner (summer) No. 1 [Photo provided to China Daily]


Cat in the corner (Winter) No. 1 [Photo provided to China Daily]


Flower & Flying Bird [Photo provided to China Daily]


Little Bird [Photo provided to China Daily]


Shimmer I [Photo provided to China Daily]


Shimmer II [Photo provided to China Daily]


Shimmer series [Photo provided to China Daily]


Spring Breeze [Photo provided to China Daily]


Through the leaves of the book Chapter I - No. 1 [Photo provided to China Daily]


Through the leaves of the book Chapter I - No. 2 [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-28 16:00:35
<![CDATA[Senior citizens enjoy Chinese culture show in New Zealand]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/28/content_1488001.htm

A taijijian practitioner performs at a Chinese culture show held by the China Cultural Center in Wellington and Tai Chi Associaties Wellington for senior citizens at Longview Home, Wellington, New Zealand, on Dec 23, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The China Cultural Center in Wellington and Tai Chi Associaties Wellington held a Chinese culture show for senior citizens at Longview Home on Dec 23.

David Mackenzie and a group of taijiquan practitioners from Tai Chi Associaties Wellington taijijian and taijiquan performed at the show, which also featured Chinese folk music.

Anne Chambers, a woman from the rest home, said sports based on taijiquan are very suitable for elderly people.

Center Director Guo Zongguang said the show aims to help local people learn more about Chinese culture through local cultural sectors and communities.


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and Tai Chi Associaties Wellington hold a Chinese culture show for senior citizens at Longview Home, Wellington, New Zealand, on Dec 23, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and Tai Chi Associaties Wellington hold a Chinese culture show for senior citizens at Longview Home, Wellington, New Zealand, on Dec 23, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and Tai Chi Associaties Wellington hold a Chinese culture show for senior citizens at Longview Home, Wellington, New Zealand, on Dec 23, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and Tai Chi Associaties Wellington hold a Chinese culture show for senior citizens at Longview Home, Wellington, New Zealand, on Dec 23, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and Tai Chi Associaties Wellington hold a Chinese culture show for senior citizens at Longview Home, Wellington, New Zealand, on Dec 23, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Taijiquan practitioners perform at a Chinese culture show held by the China Cultural Center in Wellington and Tai Chi Associaties Wellington for senior citizens at Longview Home, Wellington, New Zealand, on Dec 23, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and Tai Chi Associaties Wellington hold a Chinese culture show for senior citizens at Longview Home, Wellington, New Zealand, on Dec 23, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and Tai Chi Associaties Wellington hold a Chinese culture show for senior citizens at Longview Home, Wellington, New Zealand, on Dec 23, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-12-28 13:54:55
<![CDATA[National Ballet premiere celebrates Party's 100th anniversary]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/28/content_1488000.htm

A scene from  Yimeng, the latest production by the National Ballet of China. [Phto provided to China Daily]

The National Ballet of China premiered its latest production, Yimeng, on Saturday at the Tianqiao Theater in Beijing to celebrate the upcoming 100th anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party of China in 2021.

The work, which is based on the company's classic piece, Ode to the Yimeng Mountain, tells stories with scenes adapted from real events, with such titles as Bridge Under Fire, The Virgin Bride and Passions of Yimeng.

Classic songs composed by Liu Tingyu, such as the folk ballad, Yimeng Tune, which depicts China's beautiful natural scenery, were performed by the company's symphony orchestra under the baton of conductor Huang Yi.


A scene from  Yimeng, the latest production by the National Ballet of China. [Phto provided to China Daily]

In May 1973, the company premiered Ode to Yimeng Mountain as a tribute to residents of Yinan county in East China's Shandong province who supported Communist troops during the War of Resistance Against Japanese Aggression (1931-45) and the following War of Liberation (1946-49).

The local women, known as the "Red Sisters", not only helped these soldiers by making shoes and clothes for them but also sometimes sacrificing their lives to protect them. Ode to the Yimeng Mountains was adapted into a film in 1975 by the People's Liberation Army's August First Film Studio.


A scene from  Yimeng, the latest production by the National Ballet of China. [Phto provided to China Daily]

Jiang Zuhui, who is one of the choreographers of the company's classic production, The Red Detachment of Women, and is the artistic consultant of the latest ballet piece, Yimeng, attended the premiere and said she was impressed by the young ballet dancers'performance.

"The stories told in the piece are from decades ago and the young dancers interpreted the roles with their own understanding, which made the classic piece alive," said Jiang.

Yimeng is being staged at the Tianqiao Theater through Monday.


A scene from  Yimeng, the latest production by the National Ballet of China. [Phto provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-28 13:16:08
<![CDATA[Japanese brand makes China debut in Shanghai]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/25/content_1487969.htm

Renowned Japanese lifestyle brand Tsutaya Bookstore opens its first store in Shanghai's Columbia Circle. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Renowned Japanese lifestyle brand Tsutaya Bookstore marked its foray into Shanghai with the opening of its store in the city on Dec 24.

Operated by Tsutaya Investment Co. Ltd, the bookstore is located within Columbia Circle, a cultural space in the city's Changning district.

According to Nomura Takuya, CEO of Tsutaya Investment Co. Ltd, the store was opened in Columbia Circle because he was attracted to the historical building the store is currently situated in. Built in 1925, the Baroque-style architecture was once recognized as one of the "Excellent Historical Buildings in Shanghai".


Renowned Japanese lifestyle brand Tsutaya Bookstore opens its first store in Shanghai's Columbia Circle. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

This was also the reason the Japanese company retained the building's original fireplace and Corinthian pillars.

To mark its opening, the artworks of Japanese sculptor Kohei Nawa and Chinese artist Xu Jing are being displayed across its two floors.

In the coming months, the bookstore is planning to host a series of offline events, including lectures by artists and authors, book clubs and art-themed events.


Renowned Japanese lifestyle brand Tsutaya Bookstore opens its first store in Shanghai's Columbia Circle. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Zhang Hai, CEO of Shanghai Region Headquarters of China Vanke, the developer behind Columbia Circle, the new bookstore would serve to reinforce Changning district's image as a vibrant lifestyle and cultural hub.

The bookstore is currently only accepting customers by appointment. Customers can make appointments via the store's WeChat mini program or through Tsutaya's official WeChat account. 

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2020-12-25 16:27:24
<![CDATA[Exerting a new focus on fitness amid the pandemic]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/25/content_1487943.htm

[Photo/VCG]

It took the spread of a deadly disease across our planet for me to start taking my personal health more seriously. And while I set out to strengthen my body, I ultimately ended up more so strengthening my mind.

I hadn't exercised for its own sake for two decades until I saw my muscles shrivel and my previously straight posture curl into itself like a question mark in the early days of the COVID-19 lockdown.

What started with a pair of dumbbells has grown into a full-fledged home gym, equipped with a variety of barbells, kettle bells, resistance bands and a doorway pull-up bar.

I didn't even know what a Russian twist was a few months ago. And when I started doing them, I hated them because they were not only difficult but also hurt.

Now, I love them and do them almost every workout. They've become one of my favorites.

And I've likewise seen my first-set repetitions increase and, at best, in the case of chin-ups, nearly quadruple over the months.

I mostly use a "point of failure "approach, where a set is performed until the muscle can't complete another repŚQćuntil you absolutely can't lift your chin above the bar or press the barbell all the way up one more time. This means I keep going, no matter how much it hurts, no matter how much I want to stop, until my body gives out. It's not a matter of doing it until I don't want to anymoreŚQćit's about going until I literally can't.

That's where mental toughness comes in. Your mind keeps telling you to quit before your body forces you to. You have no choice. Well, you doŚQćyou could give up at any momentŚQćbut you choose not to until you're forced.

Then, I take the number of reps I could pull off in the first set, triple it and keep doing sets until I've hit that number. SometimesŚQćrarelyŚQćI'll throw in an extra set or two.

While COVID was a motivator, there were many others, especially as China has become more focused on fitness in recent years.

Even before the epidemic, gym memberships, marathon running and winter sports participationŚQćpropelled in no small part by the rev up to the country hosting the 2022 Winter OlympicsŚQćhave been on the rise alongside fitness-activity diversification, market research shows.

The number of gyms and customers are swelling in smaller cities, and pricier boutique fitness studios are flourishing in metropolises.

COVID, as it has coincided with recent information-technology development, accelerated an already ongoing upsurge in downloads of fitness apps, views of exercise and diet livestreams and short videos, and purchases of wearable technology.

And China's brick-and-mortar gyms are increasingly using such technologies as artificial intelligence, the internet of things and big data. These contemporary high-tech, social and market trends intersect with a traditional cultural focus on health and longevity that's venerated in ancient poems, folk tales and philosophical texts.

That said, beyond general health, I believe there's a mental toughness and discipline that many forms of exercise cultivate.

I chose resistance training for several reasons.

One is that I look at it a bit like life.

You pick up something heavyŚQćliterally, a physical weight, or, metaphorically, a responsibility, hardship or tragedyŚQćand you bear it. You lift it. And you keep lifting it until you just can't anymore, in a way that's beyond your control to choose, continuing until your mind is no longer the limit but the corporeal world is.

It damages you. It literally rips your muscles. It makes your psyche feel like it's burning.

And that, ultimately, makes you stronger in every way.

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2020-12-25 08:10:00
<![CDATA[More than just mindless fun]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/25/content_1487938.htm

The ongoing exhibition, Player of Beings, in Shanghai features an interactive computer-graphics installation by Jeffrey Shaw, Fall Again, Fall Better, which explores another aspect of gamesŚQćtheir relationship with life and death.¬†[Photo provided to China Daily]

A new exhibition at the Ming Contemporary Art Museum in Shanghai explores the intrinsic relationship between video games and life.

An exhibition that documents the past seven decades of the gaming industry and its relationship with humans is now on at the Ming Contemporary Art Museum in Shanghai.

Scheduled to run until March 28, the exhibition Player of Beings features multimedia works of international artists at the forefront of contemporary art related to gaming and explores the development of humans' gaming experiences through videos, images and interactive facilities.

"Gaming is not only an influential industry that evolves with technological advancement, but also an activity that affects people's lives," says Qiu Zhijie, curator of the exhibition and director of the museum.

"The show will facilitate discussions on the relationship among games, social changes and human beings."

The history of gaming is shown through demonstrations of game-related advertisements and video-game consoles, like the ATARI 2600, released by US video-game developer Atari Inc in 1977, and Subor D99, which was developed by Subor, a company based in Guangdong province in the 1990s.

"Another valuable exhibit is Apple II that was designed by Stephen Wozniak, the cofounder of Apple Inc, which facilitated a new era of personal computers through its graphics-computing power. Apple also laid the technological foundation for video-game advancements afterwards," says Chen Baoyang, another curator of the show.

Visitors can enjoy an immersive experience starting from the second section of the exhibition, which features a host of game consoles they can play on. Each visitor will be provided with two gaming tokens.


A net bar section of the exhibition with a host of game consoles, which visitors can play on. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Following this section is a space equipped with sofas, surrounding vintage computers and consoles.

"This is a relatively private zone for visitors to reminisce about the time when personal computers brought the joy of the arcades right into their living rooms, with no limit to time or tokens," says Chen.

Over the net bar and esports sections, visitors are whisked away to the period in time when players no longer had to fight over controllers, as local area networks and the internet allowed them to play virtually. Exhibits in these zones include the classic first-person shooter video game Counter Strike.

Another highlight of the exhibition is the 112-square-meter playground filled with trampolines, slides and ball pits.

"This is exactly how kids originally played for joy, and it shows people's original thirst for games, either by playing with sand or jumping up and down the stairs," Qiu says.

The essence of gaming is also illustrated by a 4.6-meter-long and 7-meter-high installation on the wall. A steel ball about the size of a fist passes through the installation and runs through various routes each time according to different rules.

"Gaming is a course where players familiarize themselves with rules and are constantly led by the rules to reach different results. Exploring uncertainties in the process is perhaps why most people love games," Chen says.


A replica of Nintendo Family Computer, released by Subor in the early 1990s. [Photo provided to China Daily]

An interactive device titled Fall Again, Fall Better by artist Jeffrey Shaw explores another aspect of games-their relationship with life and death. Here, visitors can determine how computer-modeled characters on the screen move-stand on the pressure-sensitive floor mats and the characters drop; exit the mat and the characters stand.

"Due to a special algorithm in the device, the characters will fall in different positions each time, and this signifies that life cannot be repeated," Qiu explains.

"Games usually reflect real life, not merely modern life. Many games, including the popular run-and-gun video game Contra or adventure-game series Super Mario, are rooted in history, legends or myths. For instance, the characters' badges and armors in the multiplayer online role-playing game World of Warcraft are influenced by medieval knights," Qiu says.

Other themes such as the impact of games on family relationships and friendships are also featured at the exhibition through artworks like the interactive installation Be Ready, which was created by students at the School of Experimental Art at the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing.

If you go

Player of Beings

10 am-6 pm, Tuesday to Sunday, through March 28. Ming Contemporary Art Museum, No 436, East Yonghe Road, Jing'an district, Shanghai.

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2020-12-25 08:05:00
<![CDATA['Meet in Beijing' arts festival adds online shows for 2021]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/23/content_1487888.htm

The 21st Meet in Beijing International Arts Festival is scheduled to be held from Jan 7 to Feb 4 in 2021, with online shows added to its program due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Titled "Passion of Winter, Online Arts, Classics in Memory", the 2021 edition of "Meet in Beijing" will feature 42 performances staged by art troupes from 24 countries. Among them, there will be 31 online shows and 11 theatrical performances, according to a news conference for the event held in the capital on Tuesday.

The festival will also include a series of Winter Olympic-themed cultural activities, six art exhibitions as well as art forums.

Every Friday during the month-long event, online shows featuring music, plays and dancing will be broadcast for free. The art forms on show will include Ukrainian ballet, German opera, Italian classical music and contemporary dancing from France, Israel and South Korea.

In Beijing's major theaters, people will be able to watch operas including The Flute and Turandot from the Bregenz Art Festival, and an HD recording of the musical Funny Girl.

The 2021 Meet in Beijing Arts Festival is organized by the Chinese Ministry of Culture and Tourism, the State Administration of Radio and Television, the Beijing government and the Beijing Organizing Committee for the 2022 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. It's presented by China Arts and Entertainment Group Ltd and the Beijing Culture and Tourism Bureau.

"Meet in Beijing" has been going strong for two decades, inviting more than 30,000 artists from more than 120 countries and regions to perform in the Chinese capital and attracting more than 4.3 million audience members.

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2020-12-23 16:11:59
<![CDATA[World in a lens]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/24/content_1487899.htm

Qi Juanjuan hikes in areas off the beaten track in the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region. [Photo provided to China Daily]

A Chinese traveler's photos from 84 countries he visited over a decade are on display in Beijing.

The first memory of travel for Qi Juanjuan was seeing mural paintings at the Bingling Grotto Temple along with his father as a child. The well-known tourist site in Yongjing county, Northwest China's Gansu province, is where Qi was born and raised. While being impressed by the 1,600-year-old Buddhist art, Qi also saw many foreign tourists then.

"I wondered why those people traveled thousands of miles to my hometown, and my father told me that it's because it's exciting to explore a different culture as well as enjoy the beautiful scenery along the road," recalls Qi, adding that his father also showed him the location of China on a world map. "The love of traveling was like a seed planted in my heart."


Globetrotter Qi Juanjuan presents his photos at an ongoing exhibition in Beijing to share his journeys and insights with audiences. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Over the past 10 years, Qi, 42, has traveled to 84 countries on five continents. He selected 480 photos from thousands he took during his trips, which are now being displayed in an exhibition in Beijing.

Having started on Friday, the show will run through Feb 7 at the Beijing Fun complex in the capital's Qianmen area. The photos on display present landscapes and customs from around the world to the audience, as part of the Polaroid Traveler public project.

After graduating from Lanzhou University of Technology with a degree in architectural engineering, Qi became a full-time traveler and photographer about a decade ago by collaborating with travel bureaus and companies.


Globetrotter Qi Juanjuan presents his photos at an ongoing exhibition in Beijing to share his journeys and insights with audiences. [Photo provided to China Daily]

He has spent four to five months each year traveling in other countries by himself or along with friends. He planned to drive through South America in March. But due to the pandemic, he had to postpone the plan.

"Since I had much more time staying at home, I could look back on my past trips by going through my photos and diaries. The process of selecting photos for the exhibition was full of surprises. It reminded me of the beautiful moments I had and the lovely people I met during my trips," says Qi, adding that some of his memorable trips include seeing a meteor shower over the Sahara Desert in Tunisia, crossing the Drake Passage via Antarctic cruises and playing soccer with children on Cuba's streets.

A photo, a painting, a movie or a song may become his reason for travel.


Globetrotter Qi Juanjuan presents his photos at an ongoing exhibition in Beijing to share his journeys and insights with audiences. [Photo provided to China Daily]

For example, Qi's longing to visit Ireland started after he heard songs of the legendary Irish band U2 while in high school.

One of his favorite U2 songs, titled One, has lyrics that go: "One life. You got to do what you should. One life. With each other. Sisters, brothers. One life. But we're not the same. We get to carry each other, carry each other."

Qi traveled to Dublin, the city which will always be at the heart of U2's story. He also traveled to the Slieve League (Grey Mountain) cliffs, situated on the west coast of Donegal, Blarney Castle, a medieval fortress in Cork, and Killarney National Park, the first national park in Ireland.


Globetrotter Qi Juanjuan presents his photos at an ongoing exhibition in Beijing to share his journeys and insights with audiences. [Photo provided to China Daily]

In 2012, Qi traveled to Cuba. The internet was not accessible except in big hotels. The buildings in Havana were mostly old and dilapidated. However, the ambient sounds of the city conveyed a cheerful atmosphere.

"There were lots of people dancing and playing musical instruments in the streets at night. I stayed in a small house and the owner had a computer. I asked him why he bought a computer with no connection to the internet and he told me that the connection would happen some day," says Qi.

"One of the most rewarding things about traveling is that you can see the world with a fresh perspective."


Globetrotter Qi Juanjuan presents his photos at an ongoing exhibition in Beijing to share his journeys and insights with audiences. [Photo provided to China Daily]

When Qi arrives in a city for the first time, he usually visits two locations to start his exploration-food markets and parks. He likes homestay tours, which bring him firsthand experiences of local customs, cuisine and lifestyle.

Besides taking photos, videos and writing diaries to record his trips, Qi also enjoys running when he arrives in a foreign place.

"Running in a city, which I have not visited before, allows me to discover something new and soak in its sights, sounds and smells."


Globetrotter Qi Juanjuan presents his photos at an ongoing exhibition in Beijing to share his journeys and insights with audiences. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Globetrotter Qi Juanjuan presents his photos at an ongoing exhibition in Beijing to share his journeys and insights with audiences. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Globetrotter Qi Juanjuan presents his photos at an ongoing exhibition in Beijing to share his journeys and insights with audiences. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-24 07:40:00
<![CDATA[Exhibition marks anniversary of transfer of China’s ancient capital]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/23/content_1487887.htm

People visit the exhibition 1420 From Nanjing to Beijing at Nanjing Municipal Museum in Nanjing city, Jiangsu province on Dec 22, 2020. This year marks the 600th anniversary of the relocation of the country's capital from Nanjing to Beijing, which took place during the Yongle period of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). A special exhibition was staged by the Nanjing Museum Administration to commemorate the historical event, and 340 artifacts from the Ming Dynasty are on display to show the different cultural characteristics between Nanjing and Beijing, and how art is related to the rise and fall of dynasties.[Photo/Xinhua]


People visit the exhibition 1420 From Nanjing to Beijingat Nanjing Municipal Museum in Nanjing city, Jiangsu province on Dec 22, 2020. This year marks the 600th anniversary of the relocation of the country's capital from Nanjing to Beijing, which took place during the Yongle period of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). A special exhibition was staged by the Nanjing Museum Administration to commemorate the historical event, and 340 artifacts from the Ming Dynasty are on display to show the different cultural characteristics between Nanjing and Beijing, and how art is related to the rise and fall of dynasties.[Photo/Xinhua]


People visit the exhibition 1420 From Nanjing to Beijingat Nanjing Municipal Museum in Nanjing city, Jiangsu province on Dec 22, 2020. This year marks the 600th anniversary of the relocation of the country's capital from Nanjing to Beijing, which took place during the Yongle period of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). A special exhibition was staged by the Nanjing Museum Administration to commemorate the historical event, and 340 artifacts from the Ming Dynasty are on display to show the different cultural characteristics between Nanjing and Beijing, and how art is related to the rise and fall of dynasties.[Photo/Xinhua]


People visit the exhibition 1420 From Nanjing to Beijingat Nanjing Municipal Museum in Nanjing city, Jiangsu province on Dec 22, 2020. This year marks the 600th anniversary of the relocation of the country's capital from Nanjing to Beijing, which took place during the Yongle period of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). A special exhibition was staged by the Nanjing Museum Administration to commemorate the historical event, and 340 artifacts from the Ming Dynasty are on display to show the different cultural characteristics between Nanjing and Beijing, and how art is related to the rise and fall of dynasties.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

 

 

 

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2020-12-23 15:03:32
<![CDATA[Chinese children's paintings showcased in Sydney]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/23/content_1487879.htm

My Family, by Luo Enze. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Innocent souls can always find beauty in this world.

Children's paintings have this magic, and such 30 works from Chinese youngsters went on show online on Dec 18.

With bold colors and creative depictions, the paintings are a manifestation of the imaginations of these young artists.

Launched by the China Cultural Center in Sydney and China Nationality Culture Foundation, the exhibition was available on the center's website and social platforms.


Fly, by Chen Xingfei. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Labyrinth, by Ma Xinya. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Sketch, by Sun Siyun. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Adventure, by Xia Ziyan. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Mother, by Chen Jiayi. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-12-23 11:47:42
<![CDATA[Chinese children warmed by bond with Australian organization]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/23/content_1487850.htm Chinese primary school student Guo Yuxin had never been to Australia, but she knew a lot about the country: its population, major cities and unique animals, such as koalas and wombats.

Guo, 12, attends the Labagoumen central primary school in Huairou district in Beijing. The school, about 144 kilometers from Tian'anmen Square, is dubbed as the northernmost primary school in the Chinese capital.

Her knowledge about Australia comes from a book given to her by the Australia China Friendship Society, Australian Capital Territory Branch, which has been providing financial support to the girl for two years.

Lanterns lit the way

Located in the mountains, Labagoumen Manchurian village, where the school is situated, was one of the most impoverished areas in Beijing two decades ago. According to Guo Luping, a teacher from the primary school, annual income of an ordinary household used to only be about 10,000 yuan (about $1,531).

"Some students even needed financial support from the school and teachers to buy stationary," says Liu Jiulei, the school's principal.

"The buildings were old. When winter came, we burned coal and the entire campus was filled with black smoke," he says. "There were no toilets inside the dormitory building. Our students had to leave the building on freezing winter nights, run across the playground and use the public toilet."

Things began to change about 19 years ago, when a group of Australian visitors came to the school.

Sitting in her home in the Australian capital of Canberra about 9,000 km away, Carol Keil, president of the Australia China Friendship Society ACT Branch thumbs through her diary to talk about how they managed to start the project in Labagoumen.

"In the first year we supported 21 students," says Keil. "Our idea was to find a child early on, when they're about six, and then take them through to high school. The total number of students that we have helped over the years is approximately 250, and we have raised $27,248 for them students."

They also donated English books and brought souvenirs for the Chinese children.

It is not easy for such a small organization.

"We do it mostly by selling paper lanterns at the Lantern Festival," Keil says.

They held a lantern making workshop, which was where most of the funds came from. Occasionally they receive donations from members.

According to Liu, the society is the only international and longest serving sponsor of.

More than just financial support

One of the recipients of the financial support was 16-year-old Lang Jinyuan. Her father died in 2012 and the entire family relied on the meager income of her farming mother.

That year she received 400 yuan from the Australia China Friendship Society ACT Branch, which covered the cost of books and stationary for half a year.

The financial support continued for six years.

"It helped me a lot in the most difficult time," she says. "Apart from buying books and stationary, I managed to save a bit to help my family."

Now the teenager is in the Huairou No 1 Middle School, which is the best middle school in the district.

"I can't express how grateful I am," she said. "If possible I would like to go to Australia one day to thank them. I would also like to help other children when I grow up."

In 2019, the funding for each student had risen to 1,000 yuan for the year.

The central government and various levels of local governments across China have been investing heavily in poverty alleviation over the years.

More funding has brought forth tremendous changes to the school: its buildings were renovated, a new gym was built and the heating system was upgraded. "Now each dormitory is installed with a separate toilet," says Guo.

Keil, who last visited China in 2019, personally witnessed the changes.

"When my predecessor first went there, the playground was dirt ...and then when I went, it had been turfed over," she says. "The buildings looked very well-kept, and the canteen was really nice.

"The kids seemed quite happy," she says.

Continued friendship

Looking back, Keil says the effort was rewarding.

"It's always good for children to be able to stay at school," she says.

"If they can stay at school, that means they have opportunities to get a good job and possibly go to university."

To her, changes at the school and of its students has epitomized China's development in general. "The changes in the country have been enormous," she says.

Keil first visited China in 1982, when there were few private cars on the streets. "Old trucks were still being used (for transportation), and in the countryside there were so many walking tractors. Clothing was very dull," she recalls.

"Every time I go back, I just think 'my goodness', it's being developed all the time."

Through the work of Australia China Friendship Society ACT Branch, Chinese people can also learn about Australia, according to Yang Zhi, minister-counselor for culture at the Chinese embassy in Australia.

"When relations between China and Australia are strained, there are still friendly people in Australia like Carol Keil and other members in the society, who would like to see a better relationship between the two countries," he says.

"Exchanges with the Australian visitors broadened the horizon of our children in the mountains," says Liu. "They were not only able to continue their studies with the funding, but also felt the kindness coming from across the ocean. It is my wish that our friendship can be carried on by the children."

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2020-12-23 08:30:00
<![CDATA[Streaming sites show more documentaries]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/23/content_1487845.htm Streaming sites have become the main platform for producing and broadcasting documentaries in China, luring an increasing number of young viewers, according to a recent report.

The report on the development of Chinese documentaries in 2020 was released by the National Radio and Television Administration at the Guangzhou International Documentary Film Festival, which ran from Dec 14 to 17.

The report shows that more players have entered documentary production and the genre has become prominent on streaming sites.

On Bilibili, for example, a total of over 3,500 documentaries are available to stream, while nearly 100 of these are original productions, according to Zhang Shengyan, general manager of the site's copyright cooperation center.

"Watching documentaries has become an important way for young people to understand and explore the world," says Zhang, noting a surge in documentary viewers on the site, from 30 million in late 2018 to 90 million this year.

Tencent Video also notes that 66 percent of its users are members of Generation Z, and the platform is catering to their demands by providing documentaries with greater interactiveness, diversity of themes and innovative expressions, says Zhou Mo, with the platform's documentary IP content operation center.

Online platforms have been producing original documentaries and securing copyright works to offer more such films to attract young viewers, according to the report.

"We'll continue to support innovations in the production and dissemination of documentaries, and encourage more innovative production methods and forms to attract more viewers, especially the youth," says Gao Jianmin, deputy director of the National Radio and Television Administration.

Xinhua

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2020-12-23 08:15:00
<![CDATA[Dance drama 'Li Bai' performed at NCPA]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/21/content_1487802.htm

A still from the dance drama Li Bai. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The dance drama Li Bai was staged from Dec 17 to 20 at the Opera House of the National Center for the Performing Arts.

Li Bai reveals the inner world of the great poet Li Bai through the choices and trade-offs he made during key junctures of his life.

Due to the coronavirous outbreak in February, rehearsal plans were postponed, but most actors still rehearsed during home quarantine. In May, as the pandemic abated, actors rehearsed together wearing masks, and some dances were improved. In November, the dance drama Li Bai was finally rehearsed along with the symphony orchestra at the Tianqiao Performing Arts Center in Beijing.


A still from the dance drama Li Bai. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A still from the dance drama Li Bai. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A still from the dance drama Li Bai. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A still from the dance drama Li Bai. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A still from the dance drama Li Bai. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A still from the dance drama Li Bai. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A still from the dance drama Li Bai. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-12-21 17:18:02
<![CDATA[3,500-yr-old tomb in NW China indicates sun worship]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/21/content_1487788.htm

Aerial photo taken on Oct 3, 2020 shows an ancient tomb in Nilka county in the Kazak autonomous prefecture of Ili, Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region. Chinese archaeologists examining an ancient tomb in Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region have conjectured that the site was dedicated to the worship of the sun.[Photo/Xinjiang Regional Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology]

Chinese archaeologists examining an ancient tomb in Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region have conjectured that the site was dedicated to the worship of the sun.

The tomb was found in Nilka county in the Kazak autonomous prefecture of Ili in 2015. Earlier excavations by an archaeological team from the Xinjiang regional institute of cultural relics and archaeology found pottery and stone tools in the tomb, which helped the researchers date it to around 3,500 years ago.

An excavation project starting last year led to the discovery of 17 lines of stones alongside the tomb, forming a pattern that resembles sun rays.

"The ray-like pattern might imply sun worship," Ruan Qiurong, leader of the project, said. "Similar patterns have been found in relic sites in other parts of Xinjiang and the Eurasian grassland."

The bottom and exterior of the tomb chamber were paved with red clay, which also points to sun worship, Ruan said, adding that the tomb's complex structure shows its owners were of high social status.

Experts say the tomb provides key research materials for the study of social conditions and cultural exchanges in Xinjiang more than 3,000 years ago.


Chinese archaeologists examining an ancient tomb in Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region have conjectured that the site was dedicated to the worship of the sun.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-12-21 11:03:31
<![CDATA[Things you shoud know about Taijiquan]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/21/content_1487795.htm

China's Taijiquan was newly added to UNESCO's intangible cultural heritage list last Thursday.

Taijiquan, also known as tai chi, is a traditional physical practice characterized by relaxed, circular movements that works in harmony with breath regulation and the cultivation of a righteous and neutral mind.

Taijiquan's basic movements center on wubu (five steps) and bafa (eight techniques) with a series of routines, exercises and tuishou (hand-pushing skills, performed with a counterpart).

Influenced by Daoist and Confucian thought and theories of traditional Chinese medicine, the practice has developed into several schools (or styles) named after a clan or a master's personal name. These are passed down through clan-based transmission or the master-apprentice model, and build upon the yin and yang cycle, and the cultural understanding of the unity of heaven and humanity.

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2020-12-21 15:02:05
<![CDATA[Video: Things you should know about Wangchuan ceremony]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/21/content_1487794.htm

Two new entries from China, Taijiquan and the Wangchuan ceremony, were added to UNESCO's intangible cultural heritage list on Dec 17. 

The wangchuan ceremony, or Ong Chun, was jointly put forward for UNESCO intangible cultural heritage status by China and Malaysia. The ceremony and related practices are rooted in folk customs of worshipping Ong Yah, a deity believed to protect people and their lands from disasters.

Developed in the south of Fujian province between the 15th and 17th centuries, the element is now centered in the coastal areas of Xiamen and Quanzhou, as well as in the Chinese communities in Melaka, Malaysia. Performances, including local opera genres, dragon and lion dances, and puppet shows, among many others, are presented during the ceremony.

 

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2020-12-21 14:54:49
<![CDATA[Chongqing: A vivid city with unique charm]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/19/content_1487751.htm

Fishing by the Yangtze River in central Chongqing, April 4, 2020. [Photo by Liu Song/China Daily] 

Chongqing, a metropolis of more than 30 million people in Southwest China, is different from other Chinese cities. With unique natural sceneries and places of historical interests, Chongqing possesses rich local cultural color. The city has become a popular tourist destination at the upper reaches of the Yangtze River best known for its spicy food and steep hills.

When the night falls, the city is transformed into a sea of lights. Decorative lights, lanterns, roadside lamps, bridges and towers all combine to form a myriad of twinkling lights, each one representing a part of the city's past and present. The city never sleeps, always remaining awake and wary of the looming mountains surrounding it.


Chongqing Yangtze River Cableway, March 4, 2013. [Photo by Liu Song/China Daily]

Built on the side of Xiaobashan Mountain with two rivers meeting at its foot, Chongqing is often called the mountain city of China. The integration of mountainous terrain and urban construction creates a special landscape here. Driving on the roads in Chongqing, you will see buildings above you on one side of the road and buildings below you on the other, as well a skyline of layer upon layer of buildings on mountains. With dazzling night scenes, majestic bridges across the river, complex urban traffic and magical overpasses, the city might cause the most sophisticated drivers to get lost in chimeras and illusions during the night.

Due to its unique landscape and humid climate, Chongqing has many other names, such as the "burning furnace", not only because of its scorching summers, but also of its signature foods: spicy hotpot that enjoys a reputation nationwide. Chongqing is also called the "foggy city", since it is covered with a thick layer of fog for an average of 68 days a year, usually in spring or autumn. The fog gives the city an air of mystery.


A transit train passing the residential buildings, March 25, 2019. [Photo by Liu Song/China Daily]

As a Chongqing native, I can speak on the subject of every mountain and river here. Many times when someone asks me to brief the city, I can be more than happy to reel off the reasons behind its charisma. The love for the city runs deep in my blood. In the nearly 40 years since I was born, I have been witnessing Chongqing's rapid economic development and dramatic changes, but one thing remains intact-the straightforward and vigorous character of the Chongqing people. The ubiquitous street culture here endows the local food and the entire city with extreme spicy lure.

With the continuous improvement of Chongqing's comprehensive strengthen and the development in its tourism sector, more and more people come to Chongqing for sightseeing. What attracts them most in Chongqing is its unique topography and cultural customs. For people from neighboring cities, Chongqing is just a short train journey away, providing the perfect counterpoint to the peace and quiet of Southwest China's majestic and mountainous landscape.


People drinking tea and relaxing by the river in Chongqing's Ciqikou, May 1, 2012. [Photo by Liu Song/China Daily]

The scenes that are common in the eyes of Chongqing people are coveted in their eyes: tourists gather at the foot of the Liziba Light Rail Station only to watch the train pass through among the high-rise buildings. They feel the exhilaration that comes with a train roaring past. Some even venture to queue two hours or more just for an experience of a five-minute cableway tour across the Yangtze River.

There were few bridges in Chongqing in the past. The cableway across the river from Jiefangbei to Jiangbei on the opposite bank was the main transport for daily commuters in Chongqing. It only takes about four minutes to get to the opposite bank. In addition, you can also take a ferry. In my childhood, there was a big cluster of houses on stilts near Bridge No 1, and Chongqing at that time possessed a pristine look. With the development of the social economy, the Jiefangbei that I am most familiar with has continuously been rebuilt. Nowadays, Jiefangbei has changed into a neighborhood with the tallest buildings. Newsstands at the street corners disappeared as more people prefer reading on their mobiles.

Looking back at the changes in things around me over the past 10 years, as a Chongqing native, I am extremely proud.


Happy leisure time by the river, May 19, 2007. [Photo by Liu Song/China Daily]


Jouses on stilts by the Yangtze River, April 11, 2020. [Photo by Liu Song/China Daily]


Citizens taking wedding photos by the Jialing River, March 11, 2019. [Photo by Liu Song/China Daily]


Chongqing is a city built on mountains, Sept 13,2011.  [Photo by Liu Song/China Daily]

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2020-12-19 10:17:18
<![CDATA[Beijing artist Hu Changqiong brings comfort in these difficult times]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/18/content_1487712.htm

Hu Changqiong's paintings are now on show at the Ici Labas gallery in Beijing's 798 art district until Feb 20. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Beijing-based artist Hu Changqiong often displays a symmetrical beauty in his paintings.

He depicts the changing landscapes near his home and workplace. His still lifes of strangers, family members and daily objects in his studio show a sense of poetry.

But underneath the soft tone of his works, Hu sometimes reveals sadness and calmness with which he deals with everyday issues.

Hu's paintings are now on show at the Ici Labas gallery in Beijing's 798 art district until Feb 20. On display are some 40 works produced over the past decade, which he hopes will bring comfort to the audience especially in a time of difficulty.


Hu Changqiong's paintings are now on show at the Ici Labas gallery in Beijing's 798 art district until Feb 20. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Hu Changqiong's paintings are now on show at the Ici Labas gallery in Beijing's 798 art district until Feb 20. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Hu Changqiong's paintings are now on show at the Ici Labas gallery in Beijing's 798 art district until Feb 20. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Hu Changqiong's paintings are now on show at the Ici Labas gallery in Beijing's 798 art district until Feb 20. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Hu Changqiong's paintings are now on show at the Ici Labas gallery in Beijing's 798 art district until Feb 20. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Hu Changqiong's paintings are now on show at the Ici Labas gallery in Beijing's 798 art district until Feb 20. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Hu Changqiong's paintings are now on show at the Ici Labas gallery in Beijing's 798 art district until Feb 20. [Photo provided to China Daily]

]]>
2020-12-18 14:10:28
<![CDATA[Iron works on show evoke nostalgia]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/18/content_1487711.htm

For Beijing-based artist Wang Jiazeng, iron often evokes nostalgia and represents an emotional attachment to his hometown in Northeast China. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Wang Jiazeng uses a lot of iron to create sizeable paintings and sculptures.

The love of iron comes from Wang's childhood memories of a large number of factories in Northeast China, where he grew up and which was for decades a manufacturing powerhouse. For the Beijing-based artist, iron often evokes nostalgia and represents an emotional attachment to his hometown.

The Event of Iron, an ongoing exhibition at the Today Art Museum until Feb 28, shows mixed-media paintings and sculptures Wang created over the past two years.

Wang's works convey a sense of historic weight and mystic feelings. He draws on early personal experiences to reflect up urban transformation, and he shows concerns with individuals who try to cope with dramatic social changes.


For Beijing-based artist Wang Jiazeng, iron often evokes nostalgia and represents an emotional attachment to his hometown in Northeast China. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The Event of Iron, an ongoing exhibition at the Today Art Museum until Feb 28, shows mixed-media paintings and sculptures Wang Jiazeng created over the past two years. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The Event of Iron, an ongoing exhibition at the Today Art Museum until Feb 28, shows mixed-media paintings and sculptures Wang Jiazeng created over the past two years. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The Event of Iron, an ongoing exhibition at the Today Art Museum until Feb 28, shows mixed-media paintings and sculptures Wang Jiazeng created over the past two years. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The Event of Iron, an ongoing exhibition at the Today Art Museum until Feb 28, shows mixed-media paintings and sculptures Wang Jiazeng created over the past two years. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The Event of Iron, an ongoing exhibition at the Today Art Museum until Feb 28, shows mixed-media paintings and sculptures Wang Jiazeng created over the past two years. [Photo provided to China Daily]

]]>
2020-12-18 14:03:38
<![CDATA[12 Traditional Chinese Values: Loyalty]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/21/content_1487757.htm

Zhong, or loyalty, means the quality of staying firm in your friendship or support for someone or something. Watch this episode of 12 Traditional Chinese Values to find out more.

Searching for Kung Fu ‚Ä?2 Traditional Chinese Values¬†is a 12-episode bilingual series. It expands the definition of Chinese kung fu, from a systematic martial art to an overall demonstration of traditional Chinese values ‚Ä?a healthy way of life to inspire and benefit the world.

Searching for Kung Fu series discusses the essence of Chinese kung fu by following the historical footsteps of kung fu masters.

]]>
2020-12-21 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Wangchuan Ceremony]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/18/content_1487659.htm

People of Lyucuo Community (Tong'an district, Xiamen, Fujian), conducted the ritual for welcoming Ong Yah at the Yingwang Square near the northeast coast, on Nov 2, 2016. [Photo/UNESCO]

The Wangchuan ceremony and related practices are rooted in folk customs of worshipping Ong Yah, a deity believed to protect people and their lands from disasters.

Developed in China's Minnan region between the fifteenth and seventeenth centuries, the element is now centered in the coastal areas of Xiamen Bay and Quanzhou Bay, as well as in the Chinese communities in Melaka, Malaysia. Those who died at sea are considered as 'good brothers' who become lonely, wandering souls.

The ceremony begins by people gathering at the seaside to welcome Ong Yah to temples or clan halls, while lamp poles are erected to summon 'good brothers' and deliver them from torment. In this way, the element has been celebrated as 'doing good deeds'. Performances head the procession and clear a path for Ong Yah's barge (wooden or paper-made models).

These performances include gaojia and gezai opera, different dances, comprising dragon and lion dances, and puppet shows, among many others. The element evokes the historical memory of ancestors' ocean-going, reshapes social connections when confronted with emergencies such as shipwrecks, and honours the harmony between man and the ocean. It also bears witness to the intercultural dialogue among communities.

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2020-12-18 12:08:49
<![CDATA[Tai Chi]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/18/content_1487622.htm

Taijiquan, also known as tai chi. [Photo/VCG]

Taijiquan is a major division of Chinese martial art. Taijiquan means "supreme ultimate fist". Tai means "Supreme", Ji means "Ultimate", and Quan means "Fist".

There have been different sayings about the origin of Taijiquan. The traditional legend goes that the wise man Zhang Sanfeng of the Song Dynasty (960-1279) created Taijiquan after he had witnessed a fight between a sparrow and a snake; while most people agreed that the modern Taijiquan originated from Chen style Taijiquan, which first appeared during the 19th century in the Daoguang Reign of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911).

Taijiquan has its philosophical roots in Taoism and is considered as an internal martial art, utilizing the internal energy, or Qi, and following the simple principle of "subduing the vigorous by the soft". Taoism is the oldest philosophy of China which is represented by the famous symbol of the Yin and Yang which expresses the continuous flow of Qi in a circular motion that generates two opposite forces, plus and minus, which interact and balance with each others to bring existence to the physical and metaphysical world.

The most famous forms of Taijiquan practiced today are the Chen, Yang, Wu, Wu and Sun styles. All the five styles can be traced back to Chen style Taijiquan. According to historical records, Taijiquan was founded by Chen Wangting (1597-1664), who lived in Chen Village, today's Henan province in China. Based on the Chen style and created by Yang Luchan, a Hebei native of the Qing Dynasty, the Yang style is now the most popular style worldwide. The Woo Style is based on the Chen and Yang styles and created by Woo Yuxing.

The Sun style is derived from Chen and Woo styles and created by Sun Lutang. The Sun style is a combination of the more famous internal Chinese martial art forms of Ba Gua, Xing Yiand Tai Ji. The Wu style is based on Chen and Yang styles it was created by Wu Jianquan.

Nowadays, when most people talk about Taijiquan, they are usually referring to the Yang style, which has already spread throughout the world and is practiced by millions of people.

]]>
2020-12-18 10:00:00
<![CDATA[12 Traditional Chinese Values: Humility]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/18/content_1487608.htm

Chi, or humility, means the quality of being humble, the quality of not thinking that you are better than other people. Watch this episode of 12 Traditional Chinese Values to find out more.

Searching for Kung Fu ‚Ä?2 Traditional Chinese Values¬†is a 12-episode bilingual series. It expands the definition of Chinese kung fu, from a systematic martial art to an overall demonstration of traditional Chinese values ‚Ä?a healthy way of life to inspire and benefit the world.

Searching for Kung Fu series discusses the essence of Chinese kung fu by following the historical footsteps of kung fu masters.

]]>
2020-12-18 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Set the tone for 2021 with Pantone's Color of the Year]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/17/content_1487587.htm

Pantone Color Institute names Ultimate Gray and Illuminating as its 2021 Colors of the Year. [Photo/Official Twitter Account of Pantone]

Gray and yellow, this color combo will probably dominate your 2021.

Pantone, a world front-runner in color design, announced recently that its 2021 Color of the Year is a marriage of Ultimate Gray and Illuminating, a pebble hue and a vibrant yellow.

Minions, the goofy and lovable yellow creatures wearing gray-framed goggles in the Despicable Me series are associated by many social media users with Pantone’s Colors of the Year 2021. [Photo/douban.com]

As soon as the announcement was made, many social media users quipped that the color combo brought to mind Minions, the goofy and lovable yellow creatures wearing gray-framed goggles in the Despicable Me series.

Yet, there's more behind the color institute's choice for 2021.

Holding that color is always an integral part of how a culture expresses the attitudes and emotions of the times, Pantone says the marriage of the two colors "conveys a message of strength and hopefulness that is both enduring and uplifting," Pantone argues.

"Practical and rock solid but at the same time warming and optimistic, this is a color combination that gives us resilience and hope," said Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute.

Nearing the end of the volatile, messy 2020, Pantone's choice strikes a chord with many bloggers and social media users.

"The selected Illuminating and Ultimate Gray shades embody the anxiety and subdued optimism we've felt throughout 2020, as we wrestled with a pandemic, a racial reckoning, and a heated election season," wrote blogger Shelcy Joseph.

"Paired together, these two independent colors strike me as sunshine piercing through the darkness," reads a comment under Pantone's latest post on Weibo, China's Twitter-equivalent.

"Even though 2020 has been dark, we are still hoping for the bright sunshine of 2021," reads another Weibo user's comment.

Now with 2021 on the horizon, you can incorporate these meaningful hues into your wardrobe, home, and more, whether together or apart, with our gray and yellow finds below.


Brazilian sustainable sneaker brand CARIUMA has partnered up with Pantone to launch its Color of The Year footwear series. [Photo/Official Website of Pantone]


A room features a gray floor, yellow wall and roof beams. [Photo/VCG]


A gray floor lamp stands next to a mustard sofa. [Photo/VCG]


A yellow sofa brightens up a bedroom. [Photo/VCG]


South Korean cosmetics brand VDL introduces the VDL + Pantone 2021 Color of Year collection: ‚ÄúUltimate Gray and Illuminating‚Ä? [Photo/Official Website of Pantone]

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2020-12-17 10:43:50
<![CDATA[China to grant 21 tourist attractions 5A rating]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/17/content_1487589.htm

Taohuayuan scenic area in Central China's Hunan province is one of the 21 tourist attractions that are newly granted 5A rating.[Photo/Xinhua]

China is planning to grant another 21 tourist attractions 5A rating, the Ministry of Culture and Tourism said Wednesday.

The tourist zone of Daming Palace in Northwest China's Shaanxi province, one of the imperial palaces that date back to the Tang dynasty (618-907 A.D.), and the Taohuayuan scenic area, in Central China's Hunan province, are among the selected attractions.

Recommended by local tourism administrations and evaluated following standards and regulations set by the ministry, the list of the attractions is open for public review until Dec 25.

Being the topmost level in China's tourist attraction rating system, a 5A rating indicates exceptional overall tourism quality.

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2020-12-17 11:15:28
<![CDATA[ Exhibition puts Sino-French artistic partnership in frame ]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/17/content_1487592.htm

A photo on show taken by Bruno Barbey in 1973 shows students at the Tian'anmen Square to greet visiting then French president Georges Pompidou. [Photo provided to China Daily]

In the first half of the 20th century, France was the top destination for young Chinese artists to brush up their techniques and broaden their perspectives. They then returned home, to refresh the Chinese art world of that time.

To mark this important historic connection between Chinese and French art circles, the National Art Museum of China, which houses a considerable collection of French art, is presenting the Heritage Immortal exhibition until Sunday (Dec 20), showing paintings, prints, sculptures and mixed-media works by members of the French Academy of Fine Arts at the Institut de France.

Wu Weishan, director of the National Art Museum, said the exhibition centers around how the featured artists, nurtured by the rich French culture, kept pushing forward the forefront of art.

"It hails the sincerity and friendship of a scholarly community, of which the members impart in their work utmost humanity, warmth and love," Wu said, also a correspondent member of the French Academy of Fine Arts.


William Shakespeare's Home, a painting by Wu Guanzhong on show. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A statue of modern artist Xu Beihong by Wu Weishan on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


France,a work by Jean Cardot on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Rope Jumping by Pierre Carron on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Green Dynasmics by Chu Teh-Chun on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


William Shakespeare by Wu Guanzhong on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Lin Fengmian, a statue by Wu Weishan on show. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Green Dynamics, a triptych by Chu Teh-Chun on show. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Bruno Barbey's snapshots of China 40 years ago are on show. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

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2020-12-17 16:24:52
<![CDATA[Art exhibit to usher in a new year of discovery]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/17/content_1487591.htm

A group show, Art Beijing Discovery 2020, held at the Lei Shing Hong Art Center in northern Beijing will run through Jan 3. [Photo by Zhu Linyong/chinadaily.com.cn]

The Art Beijing 2020, the Chinese capital's largest art expo held annually since 2006, was scheduled for May but postponed several times due to the pandemic, and eventually cancelled.

But its organizers are warming up to a reboot next year with a special group show at the Lei Shing Hong Art Center in northern Beijing.

Running through Jan 3, the three-part exhibition, Art Beijing Discovery 2020, encompasses more than 100 oils, prints, sculptures and mixed media works, created by 10 established artists of the older generations, 10 emerging young artists, and 10 newly graduated art majors from the China Central Academy of Fine Arts.


A group show, Art Beijing Discovery 2020, held at the Lei Shing Hong Art Center in northern Beijing will run through Jan 3. [Photo by Zhu Linyong/chinadaily.com.cn]

"The outbreak kept us almost in a state of paralysis for most of the year. But we never stopped thinking about the future," Art Beijing's founder Dong Mengyang said at the show's opening ceremony on Dec 16.

"We believe the Chinese art market, arguably the largest of its kind in the world, will recover in the coming year as life gradually comes back to normal. With this exhibition, we intend to usher in a new year of discoveries for art aficionados from home and abroad," Dong added.

Unlike previous exhibitions, next year's art expo will morph into two events -- Art Beijing 2021, to be staged in early May, and Art Discovery 2021, to be held in early September, said Li Bin, curator of the group show and a chief organizer of next year's art expos. "The first event focuses on established and mature artists and art groups while the second event highlights emerging artists whose works are far more experimental," Li noted.


A group show, Art Beijing Discovery 2020, held at the Lei Shing Hong Art Center in northern Beijing will run through Jan 3. [Photo by Zhu Linyong/chinadaily.com.cn]


A group show, Art Beijing Discovery 2020, held at the Lei Shing Hong Art Center in northern Beijing will run through Jan 3. [Photo by Zhu Linyong/chinadaily.com.cn]


A group show, Art Beijing Discovery 2020, held at the Lei Shing Hong Art Center in northern Beijing will run through Jan 3. [Photo by Zhu Linyong/chinadaily.com.cn]


A group show, Art Beijing Discovery 2020, held at the Lei Shing Hong Art Center in northern Beijing will run through Jan 3. [Photo by Zhu Linyong/chinadaily.com.cn]


A group show, Art Beijing Discovery 2020, held at the Lei Shing Hong Art Center in northern Beijing will run through Jan 3. [Photo by Zhu Linyong/chinadaily.com.cn]


A group show, Art Beijing Discovery 2020, held at the Lei Shing Hong Art Center in northern Beijing will run through Jan 3. [Photo by Zhu Linyong/chinadaily.com.cn]


A group show, Art Beijing Discovery 2020, held at the Lei Shing Hong Art Center in northern Beijing will run through Jan 3. [Photo by Zhu Linyong/chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-12-17 15:30:44
<![CDATA[Children's paintings on COVID-19 shown in Sydney]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/16/content_1487546.htm

The China Cultural Center in Sydney and Australian Chinese Television held an exhibition featuring children's paintings on the fight against COVID-19 on Dec 15, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

An exhibition featuring children's paintings on the fight against COVID-19 was held by the China Cultural Center in Sydney and Australian Chinese Television on Dec 15.

The 22 showpieces are winners of an adolescent painting contest, showing young people's ideas about epidemic fighting, environmental protection and animal rights.

Xiao Xiayong, director of the center and the China Tourism Office in Sydney, said the works can reflect youngsters' care toward humans and society. He encourages local young people to engage more in cultural exchanges between China and Australia.

The show will last until Dec 30.


The China Cultural Center in Sydney and Australian Chinese Television held an exhibition featuring children's paintings on the fight against COVID-19 on Dec 15, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Sydney and Australian Chinese Television held an exhibition featuring children's paintings on the fight against COVID-19 on Dec 15, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Sydney and Australian Chinese Television held an exhibition featuring children's paintings on the fight against COVID-19 on Dec 15, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Sydney and Australian Chinese Television held an exhibition featuring children's paintings on the fight against COVID-19 on Dec 15, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Sydney and Australian Chinese Television held an exhibition featuring children's paintings on the fight against COVID-19 on Dec 15, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Sydney and Australian Chinese Television held an exhibition featuring children's paintings on the fight against COVID-19 on Dec 15, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-12-16 13:23:47
<![CDATA[China Philately releases new collectible stamps]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/16/content_1487549.htm

A gold plate of Year of Ox stamps [Photo provided to China Daily]

For decades, specially designed stamps featuring the 12 Chinese zodiac animals and merchandised collectibles have been sought after by collectors. The set of two Year of the Ox stamps for 2021 are designed by painter Yao Zhonghua. 

China Philately recently released in Beijing a series of collectible products to go with the Year of the Ox stamps, including an album which features stamps and introductions of 18 cultural relics themed on the ox, coins, bracelets and gold products. Pre-sale orders can be made at post offices and at the company's specialty and online stores. 

China Philately also launched a calendar including stamps featuring World Heritage sites in China and many other stamp albums.

A list of 46 post offices across the country where addresses have the character "niu" (ox) was also released, and philately lovers can visit to get a specially designed postage stamp on envelopes. 


A gold Year of Ox stamp [Photo provided to China Daily]


A new stamp album [Photo provided to China Daily]


A set of ox-themed coins [Photo provided to China Daily]


An ox-themed bracelet [Photo provided to China Daily]


China Philately launches a calendar to include stamps featuring the World Heritage sites in China. [Photo provided to China Daily]


China Philately releases a series of collectible products to go with the Year of Ox stamps. [Photo provided to China Daily]


New stamp albums to be released. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-16 14:34:31
<![CDATA[Italian children's choir tour of Shanghai to go virtual]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/15/content_1487536.htm

Shanghai Children's Art Theater (SHCAT) will present Picoolo Coro "Mariele Ventre" dell'Antoniano, the celebrated children's choir from Italy, with the help of high-fidelity imaging transmission and hologram technology durign the New Year season. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn] 

Piccolo Coro "Mariele Ventre" dell'Antoniano, a celebrated children's choir from Italy, has toured China during the New Year season for the past five years.

Though the choir will not be able to enter the country this year because of the pandemic, their music will be presented by the Shanghai Children's Art Theater (SHCAT) with the help of high-fidelity imaging transmission and hologram technology.

Considered a national treasure in Italy, the choir is well-known around the world and is a Good Will Ambassador for UNICEF.


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

While the choir will be singing in Italy, high-fidelity imaging transmission and hologram technology will help the singers to interact with its sister choir, Hydrangea Choir, in Shanghai, where six concerts will take place from Dec 31 to Jan 3, 2021.

"For the past five years, the songs of the Antoniano choir have been a regular part of the New Year celebration for many audiences in China," said Liang Xiaoxia, general manager of SHCAT.

"This year, although they cannot come, we still hope to keep the experience alive, and hope that the voices of these children can bring some consolation and inspire more confidence in the face of adversity."

IF YOU GO
7:30 Dec 31-Jan 3
2:30 pm, Jan 2-3
Shanghai Children's Art Theatre, 800 Miaojiang Road, Huangpu district, Shanghai
021-63660000

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2020-12-15 17:36:39
<![CDATA[12 Traditional Chinese Values: Integrity]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/17/content_1487555.htm

Lian, or integrity, indicates morally upright behavior, the quality of being honest and having strong moral principles. Watch this episode of 12 Traditional Chinese Values to find out more.

Searching for Kung Fu ‚Ä?2 Traditional Chinese Values¬†is a 12-episode bilingual series. It expands the definition of Chinese kung fu, from a systematic martial art to an overall demonstration of traditional Chinese values ‚Ä?a healthy way of life to inspire and benefit the world.

Searching for Kung Fu series discusses the essence of Chinese kung fu by following the historical footsteps of kung fu masters.

]]>
2020-12-17 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Ancient method of making music enthralls modern audience]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/16/content_1487550.htm

Inside a modest building in Cixi city, an audience is treated to sumptuous melodies.

The building houses the Cixi Celadon Ou Music Troupe, which recently enthralled international visitors with its performance. Ou refers to vessels, such as cups and bowls.

The troupe performed well-known pieces, including Molihua (Jasmine Flower) and Meihua Sannong (Three Variations on the Plum Blossom) on ceramic vessels and percussion instruments, accompanied by flutes, drums, bells and string instruments.

These ceramics with a greenish sheen are called Yue celadon. It was first made in the Eastern Han Dynasty (25-220) in locations that include the Shanglin Lake area in Cixi, part of Yue prefecture in the Tang Dynasty (618-907) and now a county-level city in Ningbo, East China's Zhejiang province.

Eva Katuscakova, a Czech national who was in the audience, described the music as "heart-touching".

"If you close your eyes while they play, you feel like you are at the royal court, sitting by a lotus lake and listening to the rumbling of the leaves of bamboo trees," she said.

Yue Celadon Ou Music reached its zenith in the Tang and Song dynasties (618-1279) and began a period of decline in the late Song Dynasty (960-1279), according to Zhu Yafang, head of the troupe.

The ancient art has regained momentum following the excavation of celadon musical instruments at the Yue Kiln Sites at Shanglin Lake in 1998, Zhu said.

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2020-12-16 08:31:02
<![CDATA[12 Traditional Chinese Values: Obligation]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/16/content_1487541.htm

Yi, or obligation, means something which you must do because it is your duty, or because you have promised. Watch this episode of 12 Traditional Chinese Values to find out more.

Searching for Kung Fu ‚Ä?2 Traditional Chinese Values¬†is a 12-episode bilingual series. It expands the definition of Chinese kung fu, from a systematic martial art to an overall demonstration of traditional Chinese values ‚Ä?a healthy way of life to inspire and benefit the world.

Searching for Kung Fu series discusses the essence of Chinese kung fu by following the historical footsteps of kung fu masters.

]]>
2020-12-16 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Ink paintings of Peking Opera figures shown online in Sydney]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/15/content_1487529.htm

A virtual exhibition of ink paintings, featuring figures from Peking Opera, was launched by the China Cultural Center in Sydney and painter Zhu Gang's Studio on Dec 9.

The show is accessible at the center's website and social media platforms.

As the essence of traditional arts, Chinese operas have a large group of followers. The design of opera figures often conveys the unique personalities in an extravagant and romantic way.

The exhibition features 50 ink works by Zhu Gang, who specializes in painting opera figures.







]]>
2020-12-15 14:57:10
<![CDATA[Chinese theater academy to showcase traditional music at festival]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/15/content_1487520.htm

The National Academy of Chinese Theatre Arts is due to host the 2020 Chinese Bowstring Arts Festival with the National Museum of China from Dec 17 to 21. [Photo provided to China Daily]

To celebrate the 70th anniversary of its establishment, the National Academy of Chinese Theatre Arts is due to host the 2020 Chinese Bowstring Arts Festival with the National Museum of China from Dec 17 to 21.

With four concerts performed by experts, teachers and students from the academy, the festival centers on the integration of Chinese traditional opera and bowed string instruments, and showcases the achievements the academy has made.

The festival will also include lectures, seminars centering on inheriting and developing Chinese performing arts and the education of stage artists.

This is the first time for the two institutes to cooperate in hosting an art event. Concerts and lectures are open to public, with tickets available for reservation on the festival's official WeChat account.

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2020-12-15 10:29:03
<![CDATA[Chinese Bridge Global Music: How Can I Stop Missing Her?]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/15/content_1487507.htm

The Chinese Music Culture Online International Summer Camp hosted an online performance on Dec 8, marking the completion of its online studies and exchanges over a span of three months.

Hosted jointly by the Central Conservatory of Music and the Center for Language Education and Cooperation, this year's program, entitled "Chinese Bridge Global Music", featured online courses in Chinese music and culture, a talent competition and online showcases by students.

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2020-12-15 09:59:36
<![CDATA[Chinese Bridge Global Music: The Same Song]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/15/content_1487506.htm

The Chinese Music Culture Online International Summer Camp hosted an online performance on Dec 8, marking the completion of its online studies and exchanges over a span of three months.

Hosted jointly by the Central Conservatory of Music and the Center for Language Education and Cooperation, this year's program, entitled "Chinese Bridge Global Music", featured online courses in Chinese music and culture, a talent competition and online showcases by students.

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2020-12-15 09:51:24
<![CDATA[Music summer camp caps off with online performance]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/15/content_1487505.htm

The Chinese Music Culture Online International Summer Camp hosted an online performance on Dec 8, marking the completion of its online studies and exchanges over a span of three months.

Hosted jointly by the Central Conservatory of Music and the Center for Language Education and Cooperation, this year's program, entitled "Chinese Bridge Global Music", featured online courses in Chinese music and culture, a talent competition and online showcases by students.

This was the fifth edition of the summer camp, which in the past has invited 217 teachers and students in music to China. This year for the first time, the summer camp was hosted entirely online.

For the online showcase, approximately 100 music practitioners from 21 countries performed songs, including We by Li Xiaobing, professor at the Central Conservatory of Music, who rearranged the composition for Chinese traditional instruments.

"For this version of We, musicians from different countries and ethnicities expressed their shared feelings, their sentiments for life, love and the shared destiny of mankind," Li said.

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2020-12-15 09:30:05
<![CDATA[12 Traditional Chinese Values: Propriety]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/15/content_1487504.htm

Li, or propriety, means the customary code of correct or polite behavior in society or among members of a particular group. Watch this episode of 12 Traditional Chinese Values to find out more.

Searching for Kung Fu ‚Ä?2 Traditional Chinese Values¬†is a 12-episode bilingual series. It expands the definition of Chinese kung fu, from a systematic martial art to an overall demonstration of traditional Chinese values ‚Ä?a healthy way of life to inspire and benefit the world.

Searching for Kung Fu series discusses the essence of Chinese kung fu by following the historical footsteps of kung fu masters.

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2020-12-15 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Colorful qipaos shine in Wellington, New Zealand]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/14/content_1487494.htm

The China Cultural Center in Wellington and local photographers launch a theme activity to show the beauty of qipao, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

When Nani Mahal, a woman from Hawaii, wore her own qipao on the street in Wellington, New Zealand, eight photographers took pictures of her.

Along with Mahal, a dozen other women posed before cameras dressed in traditional style.

They were there as part of a theme activity launched by the China Cultural Center in Wellington and some local photographers on Dec 6.

One photographer, David Wilcock, said he is a fan of Chinese culture and planned to create something with Chinese elements long time ago.

Zhang Jianyong, a photographer from the center, said he feels proud to see Chinese costumes in Wellington.


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and local photographers launch a theme activity to show the beauty of qipao, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and local photographers launch a theme activity to show the beauty of qipao, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and local photographers launch a theme activity to show the beauty of qipao, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and local photographers launch a theme activity to show the beauty of qipao, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and local photographers launch a theme activity to show the beauty of qipao, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and local photographers launch a theme activity to show the beauty of qipao, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and local photographers launch a theme activity to show the beauty of qipao, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and local photographers launch a theme activity to show the beauty of qipao, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and local photographers launch a theme activity to show the beauty of qipao, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and local photographers launch a theme activity to show the beauty of qipao, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and local photographers launch a theme activity to show the beauty of qipao, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and local photographers launch a theme activity to show the beauty of qipao, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and local photographers launch a theme activity to show the beauty of qipao, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and local photographers launch a theme activity to show the beauty of qipao, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington and local photographers launch a theme activity to show the beauty of qipao, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-12-14 17:14:01
<![CDATA[Online exhibition commemorates Sino-Indian diplomatic relations]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/14/content_1487487.htm

Dunhuang Murals. [Photo/Courtesy of CFB and Beautiful India Beautiful China Exhibition]

Beautiful India Beautiful China

, a virtual photo exhibition, was recently launched in Beijing, celebrating the 70th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between China and India.

People can scan a code or visit their website to access the online exhibition, where they will see more than 120 photos divided in four themes: the natural and manmade landscapes of the two countries, the long history and diversity of the two ancient civilizations and the exchanges and development of mutual trade between the two sides.

The exhibition, running through March 8, is part of the "Beautiful China Beautiful World" series of events organized by China Pictorial Publications, of the China International Publishing Group.


Holi. [Photo/Courtesy of VCG and Beautiful India Beautiful China Exhibition]


Mahabodhi Temple. [Photo/Courtesy of VCG and Beautiful India Beautiful China Exhibition]


Peacock Dance. [Photo/Courtesy of VCG and Beautiful India Beautiful China Exhibition]


Sanskrit Theater Art. [Photo/Courtesy of VCG and Beautiful India Beautiful China Exhibition]


Temple of Heaven. [Photo/Courtesy of CFB and Beautiful India Beautiful China Exhibition]


The Ajanta Caves. [Photo/Courtesy of VCG and Beautiful India Beautiful China Exhibition]


The Great Wall. [Photo/Courtesy of CFB and Beautiful India Beautiful China Exhibition]


The Khajuraho Group of Monuments. [Photo/Courtesy of VCG and Beautiful India Beautiful China Exhibition]

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2020-12-14 11:05:55
<![CDATA[Explore traditional Chinese values through video series]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/14/content_1487488.htm

Chinese kung fu, an authentic part of Chinese culture, portrays a healthy lifestyle nurturing both body and mind. The documentary film and short-video series Searching for Kung Fu ‚Ä?12 Traditional Chinese Values, produced by China Daily website, offers a fresh perspective on understanding some of the concepts which are profoundly Chinese.

Directed by US director Laurence Brahm, the series includes a documentary film Searching for Kung Fu, short-video series Searching for Kung Fu ‚Ä?Thirty-Six Strategies and Searching for Kung Fu ‚Ä?2 Traditional Chinese Values.

Searching for Kung Fu series discusses the essence of Chinese kung fu by following the historical footsteps of kung fu masters.

A veteran kung fu lover himself, the director has practiced Chinese martial arts for more than 40 years. In this series, he interviewed many masters and scholars to review the influence of kung fu on the world and its contemporary significance in understanding Chinese culture.

Searching for Kung Fu ‚Ä?2 Traditional Chinese Values is a 12-episode bilingual series. It expands the definition of Chinese kung fu, from a systematic martial art to an overall demonstration of traditional Chinese values ‚Ä?a healthy way of life to inspire and benefit the world.

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2020-12-14 13:18:47
<![CDATA[2020 national drama tour to kick off in Beijing]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/09/content_1487318.htm

Poster of  Shangganling. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The 2020 national drama tour will kick off on Dec 12 in Beijing.

The opening drama is Shangganling, also known as the Battle of Triangle Hill, which will be staged at the Beijing Poly Theatre on Dec 12 and 13.

A total of 22 dramas will be performed in Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang, Nanjing and Shenzhen till the end of January.

During the tour, a forum discussing topics including challenges under the COVID-19 pandemic for drama development will be held in early January.

The tour was co-hosted by the Beijing Municipal Bureau of Culture and Tourism, Dongcheng district Party committee and Dongcheng district government. Started in 2017, the tour has to date seen 70 dramas performed in total.

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2020-12-09 13:33:27
<![CDATA[Musicians mark Beethoven's birthday with marathon concert]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/14/content_1487428.htm

Over 180 Chinese musicians performed in a 12-hour music concert, titled Beethoven Marathon, at the Forbidden City Concert Hall on Dec 12, celebrating the German composer's 250th birthday. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Over 180 Chinese musicians performed in a 12-hour music concert, titled Beethoven Marathon, at the Forbidden City Concert Hall on Dec 12, celebrating the German composer's 250th birthday.

From 10 am to 10pm, four concerts were staged featuring soloists, such as Xu Hong, Huang Yameng, Sheng Yuan and Zou Xiang, performing Piano Sonata No 6, Op 10 No 2; Turkish March Op 76; Fantasia for Piano, Op 77; Six Bagatelles, Op 126; and Piano Sonata No 32, Op 111, and chamber music concerts with repertoires such as sonata for violin and piano No 8 in G major, Op 30, No 3; sonata for cello and piano No 4 in C major, Op 102 No 1; and sonata for violin and piano No 5 in F major, op 24, also known as Spring Sonata.

Conductor Li Biao [Photo provided to China Daily]

In the afternoon, a concert for children was held with musicians performing music pieces by Beethoven for beginners, such as Bagatelle No 25 in A minor, better known as To Elise.

In the evening, the audience enjoyed a performance by the Beijing Symphony Orchestra and a chorus of the Beijing Musician's Association, including: Triple Concerto in C major, Op 56; Fantasia for Piano, Chorus and Orchestra in C minor, Op 80.

The event came to an end with the timeless fourth movement of Symphony No 9 in D minor, Op 125, Ode to Joy.

"Chinese classical music lovers are very familiar with Beethoven and we are looking forward to have such a large event every year on Dec 12 featuring works of different composers," said conductor Li Biao with Beijing Symphony Orchestra.

Pianist Sheng Yuan [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-14 09:34:16
<![CDATA[Winning photos from 2020 Sharing China - Happy Chinese Year contest]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/11/content_1487411.htm

The Flying Dragon performance is a highlight of the 2020 Chingay Parade. The Chingay Parade is one of the main events organized to celebrate Chinese New Year in Singapore. It represents one of the largest street parade performances in Asia. This photo won first prize in the Sharing China - Happy Chinese New Year photo contest 2020. [Photo by Wong ChekPoh/Provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Members of a martial arts school perform a dragon dance in a market during the celebration of the Chinese Lunar New Year in the Chinatown of the city of Buenos Aires, capital of Argentina, Jan 25, 2020. This photo won first prize in the Sharing China - Happy Chinese New Year photo contest 2020. [Photo by Mart„Tn Zabala/Provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A baby panda appears at a Spring Festival celebration event, Wenchuan county, Sichuan province, Jan 17, 2020. This photo won first prize in the Sharing China - Happy Chinese New Year photo contest 2020. [Photo by Xiao Biao/Provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Father and daughter take a photo with a lion that performs in a traditional Chinese lion dance which was staged to celebrate the opening of a film festival, Sydney, Australia. This photo won second prize in the Sharing China - Happy Chinese New Year photo contest 2020. [Photo by David Wong /Provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Making steamed buns is a time-honored tradition during the Spring Festival in Yiling village, Yangzhou city, Jiangsu province. The festive delicacy represents good fortune and prosperity in the coming year. This photo won second prize in the Sharing China - Happy Chinese New Year photo contest 2020. [Photo by Jiang Zhigen /Provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A blessing ceremony is held on Feb 15, 2020, to pray for the prosperity of the country and the well-being of the people, Zhangzhou city, Fujian province. This photo won second prize in the Sharing China - Happy Chinese New Year photo contest 2020. [Photo by Li Runnan /Provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


This photo taken in 2018 shows a scene in Lingyang county, Anhui province. With the Spring Festival being the most festive season of the year, streets are bathed in an atmosphere full of peace and joy. This photo won second prize in the Sharing China - Happy Chinese New Year photo contest 2020. [Photo by Yao Zhengang/P rovided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A Chinese New Year celebration in Manila, the Philippines, Jan 25, 2020. This photo won third prize in the Sharing China - Happy Chinese New Year photo contest 2020. [Photo by Bernard PasatiempoRecirdo II /Provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A dinner is made for a family reunion, Feb 15, 2019. This photo won third prize in the Sharing China - Happy Chinese New Year photo contest 2020. [Photo by Chen Jianzhen/Provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A boy holds a pig portrait he painted at a Spring Festival celebration event, in Budapest, Hungary, Jan 25, 2020. This photo won third prize in the Sharing China - Happy Chinese New Year photo contest 2020. [Photo by Liu Qinghui/Provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2020-12-11 16:08:56
<![CDATA[Fashion institute alumni showcase their works at jewelry salon]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/11/content_1487406.htm

Jewelries designed by 12 alumni from the jewelry training center of Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology are on display at the 2020 BAZAAR Jewelry International Designer Salon on Dec 10 in Shanghai Powerlong Museum. [Photo by He Qi/China Daily]

Twelve alumni from the jewelry training center of the Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology were invited to display their jewelry at the 2020 BAZAAR Jewelry International Designer Salon in Shanghai Powerlong Museum on Dec 10.

The three-day exhibition, organized by Harper's Bazaar Jewelry magazine in China, invited 34 jewelry designers and is showcasing more than 1,000 exquisite jewelry works.


Jewelries designed by 12 alumni from the jewelry training center of Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology are on display at the 2020 BAZAAR Jewelry International Designer Salon on Dec 10 in Shanghai Powerlong Museum. [Photo by He Qi/China Daily]

Besides the 12 designers from Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology, antique jewelry collection shop Lueur Jewelry, Germany jewelry brand Wendy Yang Fine Jewelry, and Dubai jewelry brand AISHA BAKER are also in attendance at the event.


Jewelries designed by 12 alumni from the jewelry training center of Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology are on display at the 2020 BAZAAR Jewelry International Designer Salon on Dec 10 in Shanghai Powerlong Museum. [Photo by He Qi/China Daily]


Jewelries designed by 12 alumni from the jewelry training center of Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology are on display at the 2020 BAZAAR Jewelry International Designer Salon on Dec 10 in Shanghai Powerlong Museum. [Photo by He Qi/China Daily]


Jewelries designed by 12 alumni from the jewelry training center of Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology are on display at the 2020 BAZAAR Jewelry International Designer Salon on Dec 10 in Shanghai Powerlong Museum. [Photo by He Qi/China Daily]

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2020-12-11 14:40:14
<![CDATA[I just want to be alone, or perhaps not]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/12/content_1487419.htm

The karaoke booths, similar to an old telephone box, are often set up in the corners of shopping malls.[Photo provided to China Daily]

As millions of Chinese Greta Garbos bask in their lives of solitude, there are far reaching social and economic impacts.

Zhang Xian, 27, who lives alone in Beijing, often uses the internet site Douban to tell the world what's going on in her life. Last year she wrote an analysis of nearly 2,000 words on small home appliances that make living alone all the more pleasurable.

Her take on these items, ranging from desk lamps and hair dryers to rice cookers and cooking machines, drew more than 100 replies, unusual for that specific section of the discussion group in which 50 replies would normally put the topic in the hot category.

However, the interest shown it what to some may seem like a trifling matter should not really be that surprising given that in China 77 million people live alone, a figure forecast to rise to 92 million in the next 12 months or so. The Ministry of Civil Affairs says these solo dwellers are aged 20 to 39 and are mostly engaged in high-paying jobs in fields such as finance and IT, so as a group they wield tremendous spending power.

Home appliance makers and sellers are thus one of the main beneficiaries of the solo economy. In one of the replies Zhang received on Douban, a user wrote: "Instead of going out on a shopping spree or spending the weekend with friends at the cinema or in restaurants, I prefer to watch movies and TV episodes on my iPad and use my electric cooker to prepare a great meal at home."

A survey by the China Electronics Information Industry Development Research Institute in the first half of the year on household consumption psychology during the pandemic found that more than 40 percent of Chinese households shelved home renovation plans during the epidemic, and this had a devastating impact on the home appliance market.

Retail sales in the domestic appliance market in the first quarter fell 35 percent year-on-year, the survey found.


[Photo provided to China Daily]

However, small home appliances are a breed apart in the home appliances market, and a report by All View Cloud, a big data integrated solution service provider, says the value of domestic retail sales of these appliances was 11.5 billion yuan in the three months of the year, online sales accounting for 9.2 billion yuan of that.

The China Household Electrical Appliances Association, says that retail sales of rice cookers, induction cookers and soy milk machines in February all rose, and the following month sales of food processors doubled compared with the previous February.

With the continuous growth in the number of those living alone, the trend of eating for one has prompted a plethora of new multifunctional mini home appliances. Among the Chinese companies selling them, Little Bears Electric Appliances, stands out for its marketing.

It has been a leader in continuously expanding and updating its singles-friendly product line and introducing more options targeted at the solo market.

For example, the smallest electric cookers used to be able to hold 4 liters, but now Little Bears Electric Appliances has a cooker with half the capacity and with a clean-cut design that appeals not just to individual needs but to needs of the individual.

The company has developed electric lunch boxes, breakfast machines, health pots, electric stew cups for different needs and has expanded beyond the kitchen to sell mini-humidifiers, steamers and other beauty gadgets.

In an interview with the current affairs website The Paper, Deng Caike, director of Little Bears' research and development center, said half of the company's 40 product categories are singles-friendly, and a typical customer is aged 19-35 and more likely to be a woman. So its appliances tend to come in warm colors and with looks that sometimes veer toward the cute and whose delicate aesthetic clearly suggest that they are meant for a smaller kitchen.

A New York University sociology professor, Eric Klinenberg, said in his 2013 book Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone that the single society is becoming hugely powerful and a harbinger of social change.

Marriage rates in East Asia, represented by Japan and South Korea, have plunged in recent years, and China seems to be following suit. Last year there were nearly 9.5 million marriage registrations in the country, according to the Ministry of Civil Affairs, 630,000, or 6 percent, less than in the previous year. Last year the total number of divorce registrations was 4.1 million, 350,000, or 9 percent, more than in the previous year. And last year, for the first time in 10 years, there were fewer than 10 million marriages.


Little Bears Electric Appliances has been continuously expanding and updating its singles-friendly product line.[Photo provided to China Daily]

In 2018 and 2019 the video game Travel Frog, a product of the Japanese games company Hit-Point, became a hit in China, and anyone who happened to spot someone on bus or a subway train playing it may well have wondered what the fuss was about.

The Travel Frog phenomenon was just one more sign of the increasing importance of the solo economy, with more and more people beginning to actively or passively enjoy and accept their solitude, says say Guo Xin, a marketing professor at Beijing Technology and Business University.

"Especially for the internet generation, eating, traveling and entertainment alone are becoming the norm in their lives."

In fact Travel Frog was a game that seemed to speak directly to those who keep the solo economy ticking. In it a wayward frog has become a baby that people are keen on taking care of. The frog never interacts with the player, eats alone, reads and does craft work at home and often sets out on journeys, sending postcards to the player letting him or her know its new location.

Twenty years ago in China it seemed that being alone had become highly unfashionable, but things are seeming to have come full circle, with young people not only wishing but demanding to have more time and space for themselves and less intimacy with others-at least of the human species. That change in living styles is affecting how people grow, age and even make their departures.

The 2019 One-person Travel Report by Ctrip, an online travel company, says 75 percent of Ctrip's self-operated tour groups at home and abroad have opened options for one-person travel. As those wanting to travel alone grows, it is becoming a strong market niche, with plans to develop more innovative products and services tailored to solo travelers.

In entertainment and recreation, too, the solo economy is changing the way things work. Mini-karaoke booths, self-service photo studios and self-service gyms have popped up on many corners in many cities. The karaoke booths, similar to an old telephone box, are often set up in the corners of shopping malls, covered by curtains, and have excellent sound insulation to meet the needs of singles to sing alone.

Such technology and urbanization are changing the behavior of an entire social group, with individuals removing themselves farther from those around them, and seemingly having few second thoughts about what they are doing but taking to this new way of living with gusto.

Be that as it may, in a world in which instant communications have drawn us closer together, one may ask how far these go-it-aloners really want to withdraw from the herd.

As Gabriel Garcia Marquez wrote in his 1967 novel One Hundred Years of Solitude: "Even if you think that your feelings have dried up and you can't give, there will always be something that can touch the strings in the depths of your heart; after all, we are not born to enjoy loneliness."

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2020-12-12 14:28:13
<![CDATA[Exhibition shows encounter between watercolor and ink]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/11/content_1487414.htm

More than 80 watercolors and ink paintings by Song Yuelin are on show, who explores a highly expressionist style with two mediums of the East and West. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The When Watercolor Encounters Chinese Ink exhibition shows more than 80 watercolor and ink paintings by Song Yuelin from Jiangxi province, who uses a highly expressionist style through two mediums of the East and West.

The show, running at the National Art Museum of China until Dec 20, reviews the evolution of Song, a leading figure in Jiangxi's art circles, from a realistic style to an abstract, spiritual style over a course of four decades.

The exhibition gathers those paintings which garnered Song much attention in the 1880s and '90s, such as Well and Women, as well as watercolors which won him prizes at national competitions and shows.

The breathtaking Lushan Mountain in Jiangxi is a recurring subject in Song's works, but he also depicts family life to convey emotional, intimate feelings.


More than 80 watercolors and ink paintings by Song Yuelin are on show, who explores a highly expressionist style with two mediums of the East and West. [Photo provided to China Daily]


More than 80 watercolors and ink paintings by Song Yuelin are on show, who explores a highly expressionist style with two mediums of the East and West. [Photo provided to China Daily]


More than 80 watercolors and ink paintings by Song Yuelin are on show, who explores a highly expressionist style with two mediums of the East and West. [Photo provided to China Daily]


More than 80 watercolors and ink paintings by Song Yuelin are on show, who explores a highly expressionist style with two mediums of the East and West. [Photo provided to China Daily]


More than 80 watercolors and ink paintings by Song Yuelin are on show, who explores a highly expressionist style with two mediums of the East and West. [Photo provided to China Daily]


More than 80 watercolors and ink paintings by Song Yuelin are on show, who explores a highly expressionist style with two mediums of the East and West. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-11 16:17:44
<![CDATA[Mother and daughter painters show a fantasy world]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/11/content_1487413.htm

Image, Fantasy, an exhibition at the National Art Museum of China, shows works by Ou Yang and Yang Ying. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Ou Yang is recognized as a home-grown painter who pioneered a movement in the mid-1980s to usher the creation of oil paintings in China into a higher spiritual realm. 

Rising to fame for her distinctive style, Ou shifted to an abstract approach to painting by reducing physical likenesses. She seeks to present a poetic touch with philosophical implications.

Image, Fantasy, an exhibition at the National Art Museum of China running through Dec 20, shows these vivid paintings. Her works are on display along with ink paintings by her daughter Yang Ying.


Yang Ying works with ink painting on silk and creates a fantasy world with a feminine touch. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Unlike her mother and father, Yang Zhiguan, also an eminent oil painter, Yang Ying works with ink painting on silk. She creates a fantasy world with a feminine touch. 

She plays with a combination of pink, purple and blue in her work, delivering nobility and grace.  

Wu Weishan, director of the National Art Museum, said the venue has special meaning for the Yang family, because the museum houses Yang Zhiguang's paintings in its collection and mounted a retrospective exhibition soon after he died in 2016. 

Wu said the exhibition shows varying aesthetics and ways of representation between artists of two generations, but also a shared embodiment of love and sincerity.


Image, Fantasy, an exhibition at the National Art Museum of China, shows works by Ou Yang and Yang Ying. [Photo provided to China Daily]


In her paintings, Ou Yang seeks to present a poetic touch with philosophical implications. [Photo provided to China Daily]


In her paintings, Ou Yang seeks to present a poetic touch with philosophical implications. [Photo provided to China Daily]


In her paintings, Ou Yang seeks to present a poetic touch with philosophical implications. [Photo provided to China Daily]


In her paintings, Ou Yang seeks to present a poetic touch with philosophical implications. [Photo provided to China Daily]


In her paintings, Ou Yang seeks to present a poetic touch with philosophical implications. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Yang Ying works with ink painting on silk and creates a fantasy world with a feminine touch. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Yang Ying works with ink painting on silk and creates a fantasy world with a feminine touch. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Yang Ying works with ink painting on silk and creates a fantasy world with a feminine touch. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Yang Ying works with ink painting on silk and creates a fantasy world with a feminine touch. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-11 16:11:43
<![CDATA[Hainan film festival highlights outdoors screenings]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/11/content_1487415.htm

If you've been to Sanya recently, there's a good chance you may have seen an outdoor film screening on the beach or the green lawn of a resort arranged by the organizers of the third Hainan Island International Film Festival (HIIFF). Check out what China Daily reporter Liu Xia (Jason) experienced at a beach screening at Dadonghai tourism resort.

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2020-12-11 19:25:03
<![CDATA[1st season of epic documentary 'China' released]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/11/content_1487408.htm

The 36-episode, three-season documentary epic China -- the first of its kind to be named after the country -- has recently released its first season, which chronicles the dynasties from the Spring and Autumn Period (770-476 BC) to Tang (618-907).

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2020-12-11 15:33:40
<![CDATA[Frozen in time]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/11/content_1487393.htm

Wumen Gate, a snowy scene depicting the Forbidden City, an oil painting by the late artist Song Buyun, is part of an ongoing exhibition, A Broad-minded Man Between Clouds and Waters, being held to mark the 110th anniversary of Song's birth, at the art museum of the Central Academy of Fine Arts. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Anniversary exhibition celebrates Song Buyun, an artist who reveled in capturing the spirit of old Beijing and its people, Lin Qi reports.

These days, a long-awaited snowfall in Beijing easily creates a fanfare online. One need not to go outside to feel people's excitement at a blanket of snow descending on the city, as a glimpse of the photos and videos uploaded on social media will suffice.

Seventy years ago, however, unlike now, while snow was not uncommon in the capital, cameras were a rarity; few were able to record the historical city's tranquil scenery. One of the few was Song Buyun, the late oil painter and watercolorist who walked the streets and captured on canvas the beauty of the capital's centuries-old architecture.

In the late 1940s and throughout the '50s, Song worked at the Central Academy of Fine Arts and then ministry of culture (now Ministry of Culture and Tourism). In his spare time, he traveled around Beijing and its suburbs, and depicted, in numerous oil works, the varying landscapes and people's life at the time.


Jialing River, an oil painting featuring a branch in the upper reaches of the Yangtze River. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Song's 70-year-old collection of Beijing scenery is at the center of A Broad-minded Man Between Clouds and Waters, an exhibition to mark the 110th anniversary of Song's birth currently running at the art museum of the Central Academy of Fine Arts. The exhibition will run through Dec 27.

Cultural landmarks frozen in time are displayed in Song's Beijing landscape series, picturing the serene atmosphere of the city's historical spots over the course of a year, such as Tiantan or the Temple of Heaven, Shichahai and the Ancient Observatory. He documented the peaceful life of people in the city and included parades on Chang'an Avenue to celebrate the founding of the People's Republic of China, visiting the Palace Museum, swimming in lakes and clearing snow off the streets.


An oil painting, titled Tuancheng, that depicts a snowy winter in Beijing's Beihai Park. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Song, who died in 1992, didn't have a chance to show this body of work during his lifetime. It was not until 2000 that these paintings made their public debut at an exhibition held in his memory.

Fan Di'an, dean of the Central Academy of Fine Arts, says: "Song's works preserve the multifaceted landscape of a city, old and new, and underneath his figurative brushwork, Song injected rich emotions, allowing his work to stand the test of time."

Xu Beihong the eminent artist, and a close friend of Song's, is said to be the one who suggested Song paint Beijing's historical architecture.

"Song's paintings show the harmony between architecture and its surroundings,"Fan says. "The colors are vivid and arranged tastefully to give a refreshing look to these old buildings."

Trained in China and Japan, Song inherited from impressionists a sensitivity to color and the contrast between light and shadow. Beside oil painting, he also worked with watercolor and classical Chinese painting, and in them he presented delightful luminosity, performing with a symphony of colors.

The exhibition also shows a dozen classical Chinese ink paintings, marking Song's resurgence in the late 1970s and throughout the '80s.


Chongqing in the Rain, a watercolor piece created in 1942. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Some are mountain-and-water genre paintings, created during his travels from northern to southern China. Others are the paintings of peaches and grapes for which Song is best known, in which he blended the techniques of Chinese and Western art to render the fruits with a fine texture.

Song once said, "When I paint, I feel like I'm free from any set rules."

Yu Yang the exhibition curator says that, in his later years, Song left two verses in many paintings, which read:"Surviving the summer storms, and defying the bitter cold, a tree yields fruits with an exceptionally sweet taste."

"The verses imply the vicissitudes Song experienced, and the pine trees, rivers and lakes in his works indicate a pursuit of high morality he lived up to," Yu explains.

Fan says Song's art shows the attitude of an honest, open-minded scholar-artist that will inspire not just the audience of today, but those of the future as well.


A photo taken in 1982 shows Song Buyun painting Changbai Forests, which is currently on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-11 08:12:03
<![CDATA[Art merges with life in Beijing business center]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/10/content_1487391.htm

Works by Chinese artists and designers are shown in a space called Yuan Living at the Beijing Yintai Center on Thursday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

To bring art to public life, Beijing's high-end commercial building operator China Yintai Holding Co, located in the capital's central business district, has provided a space for Chinese artists to show their work.

The new space, called Yuan Living, at the Beijing Yintai Center was launched by the company together with the Yuan Museum, to bring beauty to consumers and integrate art, design, businesses and life.

The artworks include furniture, clothes, paintings, jewelry and vessels made by domestic modern artists and designers.

Xu Daichuan, deputy general manager of Yintai, which owns the center, said the company believes art is an important part of business and can enrich customers' shopping experience at the center.

"We also want give more space and opportunity for domestic artists to show their talent," he said.

Xu said the space is being provided to artists at no charge.

Beijing Yintai Center includes hotels, office buildings and catering businesses.


Works by Chinese artists and designers are shown in a space called Yuan Living at the Beijing Yintai Center on Thursday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Works by Chinese artists and designers are shown in a space called Yuan Living at the Beijing Yintai Center on Thursday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Works by Chinese artists and designers are shown in a space called Yuan Living at the Beijing Yintai Center on Thursday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Works by Chinese artists and designers are shown in a space called Yuan Living at the Beijing Yintai Center on Thursday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Works by Chinese artists and designers are shown in a space called Yuan Living at the Beijing Yintai Center on Thursday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-12-10 22:14:54
<![CDATA[Ethnic people in Guizhou raise voices in song]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/10/content_1487383.htm

Dong ethnic singers await their turn in the contest. [Photo by Wu Dejun/chinadaily.com.cn]

A singing contest for a special kind of folk song of the Dong ethnic group was held in Luanli Romantic Garden in Congjiang county, Guizhou province, on Sunday. More than 600 singers in 30 teams participated in the contest.

The choirs sing a cappella ‚Ä?with no conductor and no accompaniment. The music style was listed as an intangible world cultural heritage by the United Nations in 2009.

Che Weiwei contributed to this story.


A contest featuring Dong ethnic folk songs was held in Congjiang county, Guizhou province, on Sunday. [Photo by Wu Dejun/chinadaily.com.cn]


A team of Dong singers performs in Congjiang county, Guizhou province. (Wu Dejun/For


A team of Dong singers performs in Congjiang county, Guizhou province. [Photo by Wu Dejun/chinadaily.com.cn]


A team of Dong singers performs in Congjiang county, Guizhou province. [Photo by Wu Dejun/chinadaily.com.cn]


A team of Dong singers performs in Congjiang county, Guizhou province. [Photo by Wu Dejun/chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-12-10 15:07:46
<![CDATA[Virtual exhibition in Sydney shows Hainan intangible cultural heritage]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/10/content_1487370.htm

The China Cultural Center in Sydney launched an online exhibition on Hainan intangible cultural heritage, Nov 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

An online exhibition, featuring intangible cultural heritage from South China's Hainan province, started in Sydney on Nov 26.

Launched by the China Cultural Center in Sydney, the show displays 28 forms of national intangible cultural heritage from the province.

To date, Hainan has a total of 82 forms of intangible cultural heritage, including 54 at the provincial level.

The event is part of the "Visiting China Online" series.


The China Cultural Center in Sydney launched an online exhibition on Hainan intangible cultural heritage, Nov 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Sydney launched an online exhibition on Hainan intangible cultural heritage, Nov 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Sydney launched an online exhibition on Hainan intangible cultural heritage, Nov 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Sydney launched an online exhibition on Hainan intangible cultural heritage, Nov 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-12-10 13:25:42
<![CDATA[Green-glazed Longquan porcelain displayed in Seoul]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/10/content_1487369.htm

The China Cultural Center in Seoul launches a permanent display of green-glazed Longquan porcelain, Dec 8, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The China Cultural Center in Seoul launched a permanent display of green-glazed Longquan porcelain on Dec 8.

Exquisite works from 45 Chinese porcelain artists in Longquan city, East China's Zhejiang province, were showcased at the center. And from Dec 24-30, the display will go public, presenting the history of the porcelain.

Wang Yanjun, the center's director and the cultural counselor of the Chinese embassy to South Korea, gave an address at the launch ceremony.

He said porcelain plays an important role in cultural exchanges between China and South Korea.


The China Cultural Center in Seoul launches a permanent display of green-glazed Longquan porcelain, Dec 8, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Seoul launches a permanent display of green-glazed Longquan porcelain, Dec 8, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Seoul launches a permanent display of green-glazed Longquan porcelain, Dec 8, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-12-10 13:17:04
<![CDATA[Holiday with purpose]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/10/content_1487343.htm

Wildest Vacation, a reality TV show produced by China Media Group, takes five children on a journey of discovery. They visit far-flung areas, meet with local people and experience local lifestyles. [Photo provided to China Daily]

A reality TV show gives five children a chance to see more of their country,Xu Fan reports.

When 9-year-old Lyu Kaichen watched the TV show Wildest Vacation for the first time in the summer of 2017, he was immediately hooked.

The boy saw a scene featuring students wrapped in ancient armor to guard Jiayuguan, a pass at the western end of the Great Wall dating to the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644).

"It was a breathtaking night with many stars clearly seen in the sky. The little 'soldiers' took patrols, blew their bugles and delivered messages. They seemed so cool. It was a very interesting program," recalls Kaichen, who's now 12 years old.

Kaichen has since become a diehard fan of Wildest Vacation, an outdoor reality show produced by the country's largest broadcaster, China Media Group, since 2014, which aims to raise children's interest in the country's landscapes and culture.

The show has aired on China Central Television's children channel, CCTV-12. Its latest season, which debuted in October, continues the previous format in which host Huang Wei, along with five students selected from thousands of candidates, travel around, "seeking happiness".


[Photo provided to China Daily]

After preparing for two years by reading books and training his voice, Kaichen was chosen as one of the five children to travel across four provinces to see the unprecedented changes taking place in some rural areas that once experienced extreme poverty.

The shooting lasted for nearly 50 days, with one parent allowed to accompany each child during their spare time.

The other four children, ages 8 and 9, were from Beijing, Tianjin, Xi'an in Shaanxi province and Mudanjiang in Heilongjiang province.

Kaichen, who is from Shenzhen, Guangdong province, was selected as the team leader, since he was the oldest among the children.

"Happiness is an abstract yet perceptual concept. We wish that all children can perceive happiness through journeys to meet people and hear their stories about leading happy lives," says Si Xiaofeng, chief director of Wildest Vacation.

While many middle-class families travel during holidays, Si says most rarely go to far-flung areas that have undergone huge transformations, thanks to the poverty-alleviation efforts.

"The show will help young audiences to see China as a vast and beautiful country," Si says, adding that one of its goals is to raise families' interest of domestic tourism.

The children's first stop was Chixi, a village at the foot of the Taimu Mountains in Fuding in East China's Fujian province.


[Photo provided to China Daily]

With a series of poverty-alleviation policies, ranging from relocations to tourism development, the village inhabited by more than 1,800 families increased the average per capita income from 166 yuan ($25.4) in 1984 to nearly 22,700 yuan by 2019.

After viewing the village's history in a museum, Kaichen and the other kids visited a tea factory, founded by the village's first college graduate, who has returned to his hometown to help develop the local economy.

They also learned about white-peony tea, one of China's best-known brews, which has become a mainstream business in Fuding.

Then, the children traveled to Xiapu, a county in northeastern Fujian where more than 4,000 households overcame poverty in 2018. They sailed on two fishing boats in two teams. Kaichen says he struggled with seasickness but was excited to watch fish being caught in nets.

The children also rode a slow-speed train to the Daliang Mountains in Sichuan province, and visited a dairy farm that exemplifies Gansu province's industrialization and a school in Nyingchi city in the Tibet autonomous region.


[Photo provided to China Daily]

The children asked so many questions at the farm that shooting lasted over 20 minutes, delaying the cows' regular routine.

"When the cow enclosure was opened, the cows didn't come out as slowly as usual but rather trotted to their feeding troughs. That moment reminded the children of their most joyous experience away from school," says Si.

In accordance with the Chinese saying, "it's better to travel 10,000 miles than to read 10,000 books", the journeys helped the children to become more independent, enhance their fitness and improve their problem-solving abilities.

"It's an unusual vacation," Si says.

"We hope these journeys become a lifelong treasure for these children. And we also hope that the young audiences who 'travel' with them through the show learn more about the country."

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2020-12-10 08:16:37
<![CDATA[Paper trail leads to exquisite design]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/10/content_1487342.htm

Some paper sculptures being exhibited at the Louvre in France in 2016. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Combining deftness of touch with inspiration, artist brings material to life in unexpected ways, reports Xie Chuanjiao in Qingdao, Shandong province.

It all stems from a humble piece of paper. That, combined with skillful and delicate handiwork, a vivid imagination and perseverance, the often overlooked but necessary ingredient for any successful artist, produces something beautiful. Huang Li-hsiang is an aficionado of this form of artistic endeavor. She makes a piece of paper come to life by turning and transforming it into animals, vibrant flowers or elegant decorations.

It borders on the magical. She creates "lives" with her hands and breathes "souls" into the paper. When entering her "paper paradise", in Qingdao's West Coast New Area, Shandong province, she becomes the benign fairy lady of a paper-art wonderland.

"Paper art is everything about my life, and I have been enjoying it throughout," Huang, who comes from Taiwan, told China Daily in an exclusive interview last week.

"Paper art requires no educational background nor wealth; all you need is passion," adds the 63-year-old.

"A flat piece of paper can become any 3D object, just as an individual has infinite possibilities," Huang says.

Huang, founder of Paper Art Design Studio, has been engaged in the design and research of paper crafting for more than 30 years.

Huang believes everyone comes to this world with a certain mission and hers was destined to be connected with paper.

"I was keen on folding pieces of paper when I was 3 or 4 years old and I kept fiddling with them until I fell asleep with them in my hands," recalls Huang, who has boasted a real talent for crafts and DIY since childhood.

In her 20s, she met a group of friends who were also keen on creating art with paper. They proceeded together as a team. Fast forward a few decades to the present day and Huang's childhood hobby has become a lifelong career.


A model of the Chinese Pavilion at the World Expo 2010 in Shanghai. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Since 1995, her team has undertaken numerous paper art exhibitions and cultural exchanges and left its footprint in more than 30 major cities across the world.

She and her team have experimented with the paper they use. They sometimes "coat the paper with a 'ceramic-like' layer, making it look as smooth as ceramic, and waterproof, creating a sense of dimension with some layering effects", Huang says.

Since 2009, she has been listed as one of the art designers for Vogue China.

In 2013, the team participated in a bid to create the most pop-ups in a pop-up book that was recognized by Guinness World Records. It was achieved by 168 pupils from Taichung city, Taiwan. The completed book is 107 meters in length and the entire collection comprises 149 large art pieces, 296 pages in total, joined together with folded pages in the shape of a concertina.

In 2016, the team held an exhibition themed on ecosystems at the Louvre in France, which was hailed as an outstanding success.


A piece of work by her team which was given as a gift to foreign guests of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization Qingdao summit in 2018. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Imparting passion

Huang started to dabble in aesthetic education for children in 2002, when her team launched a summer camp to teach young people the culture of paper art, and encouraged them to not only draw inspiration from daily life for their artistic design, but also live in an artistic way.

The team has opened an aesthetic studio in Qingdao, aiming to do more of this type of work and to cultivate more aesthetic appreciation in children on the Chinese mainland.

Huang first came to the Chinese mainland in 1988, when cross-Straits direct transportation was realized and residents in Taiwan came to visit relatives and seek their roots.

"I read a beautiful piece of poetry about Qinghai Lake, the Yellow River and the Jinsha River when I was little, so I had been longing to see great landscapes on the mainland," Huang recalls. "When the plane finally flew over Shanghai and I saw the cityscape from the window, I was overwhelmed and shed tears."

Huang says that, when she visited the city in 2015, she liked Qingdao at first sight. The next year, she moved her studio to the city's West Coast New Area. She adds that she enjoys the warm winter and the summer breeze, and loves to take regular walks along the beach, which often ignites ideas and brings inspiration.

One of the team's major tasks is to teach younger generations how to learn about the world through paper art.

"Our team has tried to explore a simple way to enable young children to learn the basic skills of paper art," says Yao Chun, a member of Huang's team.

"We hope kids can easily get access to paper art. However, our goal does not only focus on craftsmanship," says Yao. "The manual work with paper is a way to lead children into different kinds of knowledge, such as science, technology, engineering, arts and math."

"More importantly, children can cultivate a healthy outlook on life, and a better understanding of the world, by themselves," adds Yao.

So far, more than 1,000 children have participated in their courses.


A paper whale in her studio. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Huang and her teammates have made more effort to spread Chinese culture through their aesthetic work.

Among their representative pieces, a paper artwork that integrates local culture, history, modern development and key landmarks in Qingdao was selected by the local authorities as a gift to be presented to foreign guests who participated in the Shanghai Cooperation Organization Qingdao summit in 2018.

"The best way to introduce a country or a city is to tell stories of its local culture," says Huang.

"Paper by paper, story by story, the culture of paper art can enhance cross-Straits ties and unite Chinese people together, even with friends from all over the world."

Huang's team champions the spirit of the moso bamboo, a temperate species of giant timber bamboo that is native to South China. "The root of this plant grows deeply into the soil in its early years to lay a good foundation for future growth," says Huang.

"Once our team settled here, we devoted ourselves to our missionŚQćto spread the passion for paper art among more people."


Artist Huang Li-hsiang in her Paper Art Design Studio in Qingdao, Shandong province. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-10 08:05:58
<![CDATA[A company steeped in tradition leads the way to modernity]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/10/content_1487345.htm I recently enjoyed a fascinating visit to the cutting-edge production base of a major Chinese firm with deep roots in history and its eyes firmly fixed on the future.

Tong Ren Tang is a very old traditional Chinese medicine company which was founded in 1669 and was historically the supplier of medicines to the Chinese royal family. Today it is a leading manufacturer of traditional Chinese medicine and is at the cutting edge of innovation and modernization.

Tong Ren Tang's Biomedicine Industrial Base in Beijing's Daxing district has industrial functions such as biotechnology indigenous innovation, product R&D, industrialization of technical achievements, R&D and producer services.

As China embraces innovation and upgrading throughout its economy, this facility, which has been described as a "4.0 digital factory", is truly representative of that trend, with the automation of many production processes and the extensive use of robotics and artificial intelligence.

In fact, entering the lobby of the Biomedicine Industrial Base did feel a bit like entering the set of a science-fiction movie, with the sight of a little robot vehicle scuttling about conveying customers' purchases from a massive "vending machine" containing many of Tong Ren Tang's famous products to a delivery hatch.

TCM is based on a holistic approach to health, and Tong Ren Tang's industrial base is truly representative of that as, in addition to medicines, it also presents the company's expansion into foodstuffs, with an organic bakery, a dining area presenting a wide variety of healthy dishes and tonic foods incorporating the natural ingredients used in traditional Chinese medicine, and a coffee shop with organic produce.

Tong Ren Tang aims to achieve online and offline connection with users' upgraded digital management data, in order to provide them with an accurate and round-the-clock service.

For example, its user internet platform is equipped with facial recognition, thermal imaging detection, AI face consultation, one of Asia's largest unmanned drug vending machines and many other cutting-edge technological resources.

The automatic vending machine can be accessed by customers 24 hours a day. The purchase request is made on a screen outside the main entrance, and a robot vehicle collects the medicines from the vending machine and delivers the purchases to a hatch where customers pick them up.

This time-tested company was established over 350 years ago with the mission of "gathering herbal medicines to make the world more fragrant". But for me, this ancient brand is more than just a piece of heritage, it is very much part of China's modernŚQćand futureŚQćeconomy, by combining the finest aspects of traditional Chinese culture with the cutting-edge approaches of the modern age.

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2020-12-10 09:29:54
<![CDATA[Customers in capital line up for a taste of mouth-watering dumplings]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/09/content_1487322.htm

During Lantern Festival, which is celebrated on the 15th day of the first lunar month, long lines of customers wait outside Beijing bakery brand Daoxiangcun's stores in the capital.

The brand owns 218 stores and more than 1,000 counters in malls and supermarkets throughout the city.

Dong Shanshan, a 35-year-old Beijinger said: ‚ÄúI feel I'm missing something if I don‚Äôt eat Daoxiangcun‚Äôs yuanxiao (sweetened rice dumplings) during Lantern Festival. That day, I traditionally buy them fresh from a Daoxiangcun store early in the morning. ‚Ä?/p>

For many people like Dong, eating Daoxiangcun’s yuanxiao is an essential Lantern Festival tradition.

There are four flavors with different fillings ŚQćblack sesame, haw, nuts and cocoa.

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2020-12-09 15:36:11
<![CDATA[Time-honored eateries warm Beijing diners]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/09/content_1487321.htm

As winter arrives in Beijing, a wide range of long-established restaurants are helping diners keep the chilly temperatures at bay.

During the cold weather, long lines of customers form outside the Shaguoju Restaurant, widely known for its eponymous special dish that combines hot soup and delicately-cooked streaky pork.

Founded in 1741, the Shaguoju Restaurant serves imperial cuisine and traditional Beijing dishes.

Located in Xisi South Street, Xicheng district, it can cater to 500 customers at one time, covers three floors, has the same number of dining halls and boasts 10 private dining rooms with traditional-style furniture and decorations.

Beijing has many other well-established restaurants that have witnessed changing times but have retained their locations and reputations for flavor.

Kaorouji, which was founded in 1848 and is located in Qianhaidongyan near the Shachahai scenic spot, is one them.

The name ‚ÄúKaorou‚Ä?means roast meat, while ‚Äúji‚Ä?refers to the surname of the restaurant's founder, Ji Decai.

In 1848, Ji had just one stand selling roast mutton, but it attracted a large number of customers. Ji Gechen, the grandson of Ji Decai, bought a building near the stand, which has housed the restaurant since 1927.

In addition to its imperial cuisine and local food, Beijing boasts numerous outlets serving food from other areas of the country.

The Laoxi'an Restaurant, founded in 1954 in Xicheng district, serves dishes from the northwestern province of Shaanxi.

The Shaanxi cooking style, also known as Qin cuisine, is one of the oldest in China, dating to the Yangshao period about 5,000 years ago.

Most customers at the Laoxi'an Restaurant order the traditional Shaanxi dish of yangrou paomo, a mutton soup with chopped steamed bread.

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2020-12-09 15:27:27
<![CDATA[Four Chinese irrigation projects granted world heritage status]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/09/content_1487320.htm

The Weirs of Baishaxi Stream Project in East China's Zhejiang province comprises 36 weirs, 21 of which are still providing water for irrigation.[Photo/Xinhua]

Four ancient Chinese irrigation sites were honored as World Heritage Irrigation Structures (WHIS) on Tuesday, according to the Ministry of Water Resources.

Granted by the International Commission on Irrigation and Drainage (ICID), the inclusion of the four irrigation projects has brought the total number of Chinese irrigation projects on the list to 23.

The Tianbao Weir, one of the newly awarded projects, is located in Fujian province. With a history of over 1,200 years, the weir is the oldest extant water project specifically aimed at barring saltwater and storing freshwater.

The Longshou Canal and Ancient Luohe River Irrigation district in Shaanxi province is said to involve the first underground canal in China's history, making use of the shaft-tunnel method.

The canal helps divert water from the Luohe River, a major tributary of the Yellow River, providing irrigation to local farms in the face of drought and water shortages.


The Sangyuanwei Polder Embankment System is situated in southern China's Guangdong province, with construction starting in the 10th Century.[Photo/Xinhua]

The Weirs of Baishaxi Stream Project in East China's Zhejiang province comprises 36 weirs, 21 of which are still providing water for irrigation. The weir complex covers 45 km of the Baishaxi Stream and has a total water-level drop of 168 meters.

The Sangyuanwei Polder Embankment System is situated in southern China's Guangdong province, with construction starting in the 10th Century. The embankment extends for 64.8 km and the system provides irrigation, drainage canals and water pathways.

Besides the four Chinese projects, 10 irrigation projects from five countries, including India, Iran, Japan, the Republic of Korea and South Africa, were also honored this year.


The Tianbao Weir, one of the newly awarded projects, is located in Fujian province. With a history of over 1,200 years, the weir is the oldest extant water project specifically aimed at barring saltwater and storing freshwater.[Photo/Xinhua]

Established in 1950, the ICID is an international organization aimed at boosting scientific and technological exchange on irrigation, drainage and flood control.

The WHIS award, set up by the ICID in 2014, aims to protect and promote irrigation projects of historical value and their scientific experience. So far, 105 ancient irrigation projects around the world have been enlisted.

Chen Mingzhong, an official with the ministry, said the ancient irrigation projects are treasures of China's water-culture development, as well as being of great value to the development of irrigation agriculture in China.


The Longshou Canal and Ancient Luohe River Irrigation district in Shaanxi province is said to involve the first underground canal in China's history, making use of the shaft-tunnel method.

 

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2020-12-09 14:35:11
<![CDATA[Changchun kicks off plan to draw Beijing travelers]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/09/content_1487317.htm Major travel agencies in Changchun, capital of Northeast China's Jilin province, and Beijing reached a deal to work together in developing distinctive winter tours across Changchun and the rest of the province on Dec 8.

The goal is to draw Beijing residents to savor Changchun's winter charm.

The northeastern city has launched six routes featuring local folk customs, hot springs and wellness elements for winter vacationers this year.

A series of favorable policies will be launched, including winter sports consumption coupons worth 10.5 million yuan ($1.6 million) and culture and tourism consumption coupons worth 16 million yuan, according to Wang Lu, deputy mayor of Changchun.

The city abounds in winter tourism resources, including powder snow, hot springs and stunning winter forest views.

To date, about 20 daily flights travel from Changchun to Beijing.

The Beijing-Shenyang high-speed rail is expected to start operations by the end of December,  which will cut travel between Changchun and Beijing to about 3.5 hours, adding to the access to Jilin's winter fun.

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2020-12-09 13:29:30
<![CDATA[Splendor of Palace Museum seen in Google virtual tour]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/09/content_1487314.htm

A new online exhibition featuring the Palace Museum, one of the world’s most renowned cultural heritage sites, was unveiled by Google Arts & Culture on Dec 8, aiming to allow people from around the world to explore parts of the famous site virtually.

Visitors can enjoy a 360-degree virtual tour of three main structures‚ÄĒthe Hall of Supreme Harmony, the Meridian Gate, and the Gate of Supreme Harmony. Moreover, 19 new online exhibitions with high-resolution images of thrones and decorations in the Palace Museum will be launched, with some of the displayed items not usually being accessible to visitors. These include rare paintings that show the splendor of life in the Forbidden City, such as Album Leaf from the Grand Wedding of the Guangxu Emperor, which is being displayed online for the first time.

The Forbidden City, known today as the Palace Museum, is celebrating the 600th anniversary of the completion of the compound's construction. This year also marks the 95th anniversary of the establishment of the museum, the largest in China and home to more than 1.8 million cultural treasures.

It served as the imperial palace during the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1368) dynasties. As the center of the Chinese empire, the Forbidden City was home to 24 emperors. In December 1987, it was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site and has since become one of the country's leading cultural attractions, drawing millions of visitors every year.

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2020-12-09 10:53:40
<![CDATA[Photo exhibition offers glimpse into master's spiritual haven]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/08/content_1487282.htm

A Fine Shower. [Photo/Courtesy of Yuz Foundation and Yuz Museum]

Moye Jingshe in Taipei is known as the last residence of master artist Zhang Daqian, which he carefully designed and transformed into a modern version of classical Chinese gardens and a spiritual haven.

There Zhang also received friends among whom Hu Chongxian, the renowned photographer, captured the poetic beauty and philosophical ideas of Moye Jingshe. 

The Adobe of Illusions: The Garden of Zhang Daqian, now on at the Yuz Museum Shanghai until April 11, offers a glimpse of Moye Jingshe by showing a collection of Hu's photos on which Zhang left handwritten comments.

Through his lens, one can savor the mansion's serenity which reflects Zhang's utmost aesthetic taste. Also, Hu zoomed in on the lotus and plum blossoms in the garden which show Zhang's great passion for nature.


A Single Branch. [Photo/Courtesy of Yuz Foundation and Yuz Museum]


Her Captivating Appearance. [Photo/Courtesy of Yuz Foundation and Yuz Museum]


Jade Green Straws. [Photo/Courtesy of Yuz Foundation and Yuz Museum]


Powdered Red Cheeks. [Photo/Courtesy of Yuz Foundation and Yuz Museum]


The Abode of Illusions. [Photo/Courtesy of Yuz Foundation and Yuz Museum]


The Adobe of Illusions, now on at the Yuz Museum Shanghai until April 11, offers a glimpse of Moye Jingshe, Zhang Daqian's last residence. [Photo by Wang Qing/China Daily]


The Adobe of Illusions, now on at the Yuz Museum Shanghai until April 11, shows photos of Moye Jingshe taken by Hu Chongxian. [Photo by Wang Qing/China Daily]

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2020-12-08 16:27:36
<![CDATA[Friendship and respect marked by sold painting]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/08/content_1487281.htm

At 91, Qi Baishi painted Lotus in Fall to show a vibrant, tranquil scene of booming lotuses. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The lotus is a recurring subject favored by generations of Chinese painters, not only because of its beauty, elegance and poetic feel. This special plant also symbolizes the high morality in Chinese cultural traditions.

Late master painter Qi Baishi was also an avid admirer of the lotus. He once planted lotuses in the pond in his native home in Hunan province. He spent a lot of time observing lotus flowers and leaves and studying how previous painters depicted them.

At 91, Qi painted Lotus in Fall and gifted the work to Situ Meitang an overseas Chinese leader. It shows a vibrant, tranquil scene of booming lotuses.

The painting sold for 25.3 million yuan ($3.86 million) recently at the inaugural sales of Beijing Hongmao International Auction Co Ltd.

The sales included more than 1,500 lots covering classical Chinese paintings and calligraphy, jade objects, furniture pieces, lacquer apparatuses, Buddhist statues and more.

A calligraphic work by Qing (1644-1911) Emperor Qianlong fetched 16.1 million yuan.


A calligraphic work by Qing (1644-1911) Emperor Qianlong. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) Buddhism-themed painting. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) jade, three-legged incense burner. [Photo provided to China Daily]


An 18th-century painting by Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) court artist Shen Qinglan. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-08 16:17:30
<![CDATA[Exhibition presents theaters of waiting and randomness]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/08/content_1487280.htm

Seven Portraits, No 1. [Photo/Courtesy of Xie Nanxing and Galerie Urs Meile.]

In his triptych of 2019, A Theater of Waiting, Xie Nanxing depicts three daily scenes at airport: People wait in lines for security checks and at boarding gates, and sit in an aircraft cabinet for takeoff. 

He renders to the common scenarios a theatrical feeling, arousing interest of the viewers in the individual stories of people in the paintings: Who they are, what they do and where they are going. 

And he raises questions about the state of waiting and uncertainties of the future, which are at the heart of his solo exhibition, A Roll of the Dice.

The show at the Galerie Urs Meile's space in Beijing's 798 art district, through Jan 31, displays a dozen paintings including A Theater of Waiting. 

Hung on blue and red walls, the works offer a glimpse of the spiritual theaters of romance and novelty in Xie's mind.


Seven Portraits, No 3. [Photo/Courtesy of Xie Nanxing and Galerie Urs Meile]


Seven Portraits, No 6. [Photo/Courtesy of Xie Nanxing and Galerie Urs Meile]


Seven Portraits, No 7. [Photo/Courtesy of Xie Nanxing and Galerie Urs Meile]


Xie Nanxing's exhibition, A Roll of the Dice, is at the Galerie Urs Meile's space in Beijing's 798 art district, through Jan 31. [Photo/Courtesy of Galerie Urs Meile]


Xie Nanxing's exhibition,  A Roll of the Dice, is at the Galerie Urs Meile's space in Beijing's 798 art district, through Jan 31. [Photo/Courtesy of Galerie Urs Meile]


Xie Nanxing's exhibition,  A Roll of the Dice, is at the Galerie Urs Meile's space in Beijing's 798 art district, through Jan 31. [Photo/Courtesy of Galerie Urs Meile]

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2020-12-08 16:13:23
<![CDATA[Exhibition of calligraphy and seal engraving marks Yellow River spirit]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/08/content_1487279.htm

An exhibition in Beijing now shows 126 works of calligraphy and seal engraving art to pay tribute to the history of the Yellow River. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The Yellow River, hailed as the mother river and cradle of the Chinese civilization, has been depicted as a national symbol in artworks throughout centuries.

An exhibition in Beijing now shows 126 works of calligraphy and seal engraving art to pay tribute to the history of the Yellow River and the diverse culture it nurtures along the way.

The exhibition at the China National Academy of Painting until Dec 11 teams up 63 artists who traveled in nine provinces and autonomous regions in May for inspiration for their creations.


An exhibition in Beijing now shows 126 works of calligraphy and seal engraving art to pay tribute to the history of the Yellow River. [Photo provided to China Daily]


An exhibition in Beijing now shows 126 works of calligraphy and seal engraving art to pay tribute to the history of the Yellow River. [Photo provided to China Daily]


An exhibition in Beijing now shows 126 works of calligraphy and seal engraving art to pay tribute to the history of the Yellow River. [Photo provided to China Daily]


An exhibition in Beijing now shows 126 works of calligraphy and seal engraving art to pay tribute to the history of the Yellow River. [Photo provided to China Daily]


An exhibition in Beijing now shows 126 works of calligraphy and seal engraving art to pay tribute to the history of the Yellow River. [Photo provided to China Daily]


An exhibition in Beijing now shows 126 works of calligraphy and seal engraving art to pay tribute to the history of the Yellow River. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-08 16:07:39
<![CDATA[Calligraphy on show celebrates an innovative legend]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/08/content_1487278.htm

Yuichi Inoue is known for inventing novel ways to practice and appreciate calligraphy, such as the "one-character writing". [Photo provided to China Daily]

Yuichi Inoue, one of the most distinguished calligraphers in the second half of 20th-century Japan, is known for inventing novel ways to practice and appreciate calligraphy, such as the "one-character writing".

Yuichi Inoue: Bell Tolls from Japan, an exhibition now on at Tsinghua University Art Museum through March 28, shows 112 works spanning the great calligrapher's whole career. 

The exhibition, the most comprehensive showcase of Inoue's works in China so far, invites a walk into his artistic sphere: How he renewed people's understanding of classical Eastern calligraphy, and how his abstract and highly expressive style introduced the world to the depth of Eastern culture and influenced those on the forefront of Western art in the 1950s and '60s.


Yuichi Inoue is known for inventing novel ways to practice and appreciate calligraphy, such as the "one-character writing". [Photo provided to China Daily]


Yuichi Inoue is known for inventing novel ways to practice and appreciate calligraphy, such as the "one-character writing". [Photo provided to China Daily]


Yuichi Inoue is known for inventing novel ways to practice and appreciate calligraphy, such as the "one-character writing". [Photo provided to China Daily]


Yuichi Inoue Bell Tolls from Japan, an exhibition now on at Tsinghua University Art Museum, shows 112 works spanning the great calligrapher’s whole career. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Yuichi Inoue Bell Tolls from Japan, an exhibition now on at Tsinghua University Art Museum, shows 112 works spanning the great calligrapher’s whole career. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Yuichi Inoue Bell Tolls from Japan, an exhibition now on at Tsinghua University Art Museum, shows 112 works spanning the great calligrapher’s whole career. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Yuichi Inoue Bell Tolls from Japan, an exhibition now on at Tsinghua University Art Museum, shows 112 works spanning the great calligrapher’s whole career. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-08 16:01:40
<![CDATA[Reading for better life]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/08/content_1487263.htm

Children enjoy reading time at a "neighborhood library" in Foshan, Guangdong province. The N-Library program plays an active role in locals' cultural lives. [Photo Provided to China Daily]

Organization donates many books to children in poor areas to help locals turn a new page, Yang Yang reports.

Fourteen years ago, when Wu Jingxun started visiting villages in the Liangshan Yi autonomous prefecture, Southwest China's Sichuan province, one of the most poverty-stricken areas in the country, the volunteer teacher visited families to see what books the children read.

To his surprise, in the Baidiao Miao autonomous town, he found not a single book in the house of any family, but at the house of the headmaster of the local primary school, there were threeŚQćone about ideology and morality, one periodical on education and a Reader's Digest magazine left by some tourist.

"The kids knew enough words and the parents also understood the importance of education, but there was no other reading material apart from those, the covers of which had been worn out," recalls Wu, 46, who's from Foshan, South China's Guangdong province.

After that, Wu and his colleagues at Friends Camp, a volunteer organization, donated many books, including picture books that won the Caldecott Medal, to the primary school.

One year later, in 2007, when they revisited the school and conducted a survey among students about their favorite books, they were shocked to find the top three choices were Pleasant Goat and Big Big Wolf, Boonie Bears and Snow White. The first two Chinese picture books have spawned immensely popular TV adaptations which entertain children throughout the country.

"The survey showed that children in the village were not interested in reading and did not know how. Even if you put great books in front of them, they just leafed through the picture books without them making much of an impression," Wu says.

This experience urged Wu and his colleagues to promote reading and to teach children how to read, especially in poor villages.

"The gaps regarding reading and vision are among the growing differences between children in urban areas and those in the countryside," Wu says, based on 15 years of volunteer teaching in poor areas in Qinghai, Yunnan and Gansu provinces, and the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region.

Without proper guidance, the gap will grow even wider, he says.


Youngsters and their parents take part in an activity hosted by the N-Library program in Foshan, Guangdong province. [Photo Provided to China Daily]

"In some good primary schools in Foshan, grade-three students can finish reading 15 books a year and, in some cases, even more. But, in poor areas, grade-six students barely know 1,800 Chinese characters, which they may not understand when used in texts," Wu says.

In the long term, those who don't read regularly usually have poor comprehension skills, which will influence their understanding of math, history and biology, he says.

As a result, 99 percent of the children in the countryside will go to work after finishing middle school, he says.

"If they can take up reading as a habit or a hobby, they can benefit more. They can read in their free time rather than watching TikTok on their phones," he says, adding "if they have kids, they will also buy books for them".

Wu, who was born and grew up in the countryside, started reading novels extensively in college.

"What's best about reading is that one can experience the different lives portrayed in the novels," he says.

Now he focuses on picture books and science as he volunteers to teach children how to read.

Library program

In September, Wu registered at Foshan Library as a member of the N-Library program, which also seeks to help children in poor areas. Launched in 2018, the program has been inviting ordinary families to build small "neighborhood libraries" at home that allow relatives and friends to borrow books. When approved, a family can borrow 200 books from the public library in Foshan and keep them for one year.

"In this way, public resources can be better used by citizens," says Zhang Meng, an associate librarian at Foshan Library.

So far, more than 1,130 families have registered for the program. Apart from the lending services, families are also required to host various kinds of activities. One of the "neighborhood libraries" regularly hosts activities according to seasons, with themes of poetry and gourmet cooking, inviting kids to their homes to make dumplings.

Foshan, an important manufacturing hub, has been developed quickly over the last 40 years. In 2019, the local GDP surpassed 1 trillion yuan ($153 billion).

To better meet people's needs, the local government has been attaching importance to the development of public libraries.

Since 2004, Foshan has been building a public library service network and, in 2015, it started a library alliance project led by Foshan Library. So far, 342 public libraries have joined the alliance, meaning that, on average, 24,000 people in Foshan share one public library, exceeding the goal of one library for every 30,000 people set by the International Federation of Library Associations.


A volunteer from Foshan hosts a reading event for children in the countryside of Yushu Tibet autonomous prefecture in Qinghai province. [Photo Provided to China Daily]

"An ideal library is one that residents in the city can be happy with," says Huang Baichuan, chief librarian, Foshan Library.

A poll among 8,566 residents in Foshan showed that in 2019, on average, people read 9.59 paper books and 9.80 digital books. In comparison, the national level over the same period was 4.65 books.

In 2019, there were more than 1.44 million readers registered at the 342 public libraries in Foshan, and more than 42 percent of the registered readers were from outside the city. In 2019, the city's public libraries hosted a total of 5,938 events, involving more than 1.8 million people, according to Foshan Library.

The key to the N-Library program is that the "neighborhood libraries "know more about the needs of their users, so they can provide customized services, Zhang explains.

"Foshan Library used to be a provider of public cultural services, but now it has become a platform where people play their roles as providers of services to each other," she says.

Some families who have taken part in the program often gather together and borrow books from each other. When some parents go to pick up their children from the kindergarten, they carry books in the trunks of their cars for other parents to browse and borrow.

"They all have their strengths, so many of them can do better than public libraries," Zhang says.

Another advantage of the program is that it does not need much investment in building public spaces or human resources, she says.

Every year, Foshan Library assesses the work of the "neighborhood libraries" to see if they are qualified to continue another year. In July, the program won the International Federation of Library Associations PressReader International Marketing Award for 2020.


Wu Jingxun shows a donated picture book in his "neighborhood library" in Foshan. [Photo by Yang Yang/China Daily]

Poverty alleviation

For decades, Foshan has been helping poor areas with financial and cultural support. One of the fruits of this labor is the first "neighborhood library" in Muli, Sichuan's Liangshan, which Huang recently visited. Foshan Library has donated 5,000 books to the branch.

Wu and his team went to the Muli library to host the first picture book reading event to teach both parents and children how to read. Twenty villagers attended.

At their Friends Camp N-Library in downtown Foshan, there are mainly books aimed at students from grade one to grade eight, including picture books from home and abroad, and science books about oceans and quantum mechanics. The library is mainly for students in poor areas, such as those in Muli.

"We hope the books that we donated to Muli and other poor places can help the locals in their poverty-alleviation efforts," Huang says.

Wu says he believes that even when children become delivery people or migrant workers when they grow up, if they keep reading, books will help them to live a better life.

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2020-12-08 08:07:03
<![CDATA[Children visit exhibition on Shaanxi intangible heritage in Sydney]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/07/content_1487254.htm

Students and teachers from a Chinese school in Sydney visit an exhibition featuring intangible cultural heritage from Northwest China’s Shaanxi province, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

About 50 students and teachers from a Chinese school in Sydney visited an exhibition featuring intangible cultural heritage from Northwest China’s Shaanxi province on Dec 6.

Launched by the China Cultural Center in Sydney, the event featured about 100 works by intangible cultural heritage inheritors from Shaanxi province, including mud sculptures, Yaozhou porcelain and embroidery.

Parents of the students said the visit was a valuable chance for children who were born in Australia to learn about Chinese culture.


Students and teachers from a Chinese school in Sydney visit an exhibition featuring intangible cultural heritage from Northwest China’s Shaanxi province, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Students and teachers from a Chinese school in Sydney visit an exhibition featuring intangible cultural heritage from Northwest China’s Shaanxi province, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Students and teachers from a Chinese school in Sydney visit an exhibition featuring intangible cultural heritage from Northwest China’s Shaanxi province, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Students and teachers from a Chinese school in Sydney visit an exhibition featuring intangible cultural heritage from Northwest China’s Shaanxi province, Dec 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-12-07 16:03:44
<![CDATA[Traditional Chinese music graces Wellington’s Christmas parade]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/07/content_1487213.htm

Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand, has held its annual Christmas parade. More than 20,000 local people attended the event at Lambton Quay, and Mayor Andy Foster participated as well. The China Cultural Center in Wellington was invited to perform traditional Chinese musical instruments at the event from Nov 28 to 29, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand, has held its annual Christmas parade. More than 20,000 local people attended the event at Lambton Quay, and Mayor Andy Foster participated as well. The China Cultural Center in Wellington was invited to perform traditional Chinese musical instruments at the event from Nov 28 to 29, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand, has held its annual Christmas parade. More than 20,000 local people attended the event at Lambton Quay, and Mayor Andy Foster participated as well. The China Cultural Center in Wellington was invited to perform traditional Chinese musical instruments at the event from Nov 28 to 29, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand, has held its annual Christmas parade. More than 20,000 local people attended the event at Lambton Quay, and Mayor Andy Foster participated as well. The China Cultural Center in Wellington was invited to perform traditional Chinese musical instruments at the event from Nov 28 to 29, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand, has held its annual Christmas parade. More than 20,000 local people attended the event at Lambton Quay, and Mayor Andy Foster participated as well. The China Cultural Center in Wellington was invited to perform traditional Chinese musical instruments at the event from Nov 28 to 29, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand, has held its annual Christmas parade. More than 20,000 local people attended the event at Lambton Quay, and Mayor Andy Foster participated as well. The China Cultural Center in Wellington was invited to perform traditional Chinese musical instruments at the event from Nov 28 to 29, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand, has held its annual Christmas parade. More than 20,000 local people attended the event at Lambton Quay, and Mayor Andy Foster participated as well. The China Cultural Center in Wellington was invited to perform traditional Chinese musical instruments at the event from Nov 28 to 29, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand, has held its annual Christmas parade. More than 20,000 local people attended the event at Lambton Quay, and Mayor Andy Foster participated as well. The China Cultural Center in Wellington was invited to perform traditional Chinese musical instruments at the event from Nov 28 to 29, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand, has held its annual Christmas parade. More than 20,000 local people attended the event at Lambton Quay, and Mayor Andy Foster participated as well. The China Cultural Center in Wellington was invited to perform traditional Chinese musical instruments at the event from Nov 28 to 29, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand, has held its annual Christmas parade. More than 20,000 local people attended the event at Lambton Quay, and Mayor Andy Foster participated as well. The China Cultural Center in Wellington was invited to perform traditional Chinese musical instruments at the event from Nov 28 to 29, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

 

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2020-12-07 11:14:59
<![CDATA[Dynamic digital creations]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/07/content_1487206.htm

More than 40,000 people visit the recent Nanjing Art Fair International, which took place from Nov 26 to 29 at the Nanjing International Exhibition Center in Jiangsu province's capital. This year's edition of the event featured exhibitions from 27 galleries and four museums from around the world. [Photo provided to China Daily]

A recent fair in Jiangsu's provincial capital presented new media art, which is a relatively novel genre in the country, Zhang Kun reports in Nanjing.

Nanjing Art Fair International claims to be China's first such event to solely feature video and new media art.

This year's edition of the event, which took place from Nov 26 to 29, presented a visual extravaganza to more than 40,000 visitors at the Nanjing International Exhibition Center in Jiangsu province's capital.

The fair wasn't disrupted by the pandemic since new media art doesn't require the complicated process of international shipping, even though 60 percent of the participating galleries are from overseas.

"Nanjing is a city of rich cultural heritage, and I'd like to present a modern and fashionable side of the city," chief curator Kong Chao says, explaining the decision to focus on the genre.

Also, the nearby city of Shanghai hosts several well-established art fairs. So, NAFI, which was founded last year, chose new media to set itself apart.

NAFI2020 was hosted by Nanjing's publicity department and cultural and tourism administration, and featured exhibitions from 27 galleries and four museums.

Most galleries were from abroad, Kong says, because new media art is better developed in the West, where it's also popular.

"In fact, Nanjing has many collectors interested in new media art," Kong says.


[Photo provided to China Daily]

NAFI2019 achieved a sales volume of just under $1 million, and "presales went much better than expected" this year, he says.

Nanjing's collectors have developed an awareness of new media works' value and appreciate their relatively low prices. This enables new collectors to access top-notch works from the global scene, he explains.

The city's contemporary art scene is undergoing a boom, he says.

A series of new private museums have been opening, and Nanjing has been adopting policies to support galleries.

It also pledged to provide social security and pensions for artists who are ready to move in.

"We set up a special booth at NAFI2020 to introduce the policies and services supporting artists and institutions interested in Nanjing," he says.

"Nanjing is less stressful than Beijing or Shanghai. We have a large number of good universities and art schools here. And its cultural and historical atmosphere has strong appeal, too."


[Photo provided to China Daily]

HdM Gallery, which has operated in Paris, London and Beijing for the past 12 years, participated in NAFI for the first time this year.

The gallery was given free show space at the event, says HdM cofounder Olivier Hervet.

"Besides, we have had some clients in Nanjing," he says.

It presented a solo exhibition of digital photographs by 30-year-old Chinese artist Hu Weiyi and sales started from the first day.

One of NAFI's missions was to introduce some of the best works and practices of contemporary art to the city, and provide quality cultural experiences for its people, Kong says.

"So, we prepared colorful events aside from the main exhibition".


[Photo provided to China Daily]

The event featured Spain as its highlight country this year, with Spanish food and drinks showcased alongside artworks by Salvadore Dali and Pablo Picasso.

NAFI2020 also presented a fashion show on the opening evening, featuring the debuts of seven designers from the Federation de la Haute Couture et de la Mode.

And two special projectsŚQćthe W! ld, focusing on young designers and alternative culture, and NAFI Jeans, a creative market place for handicrafts and new creations incorporating traditional Chinese heritageŚQćtook place alongside the main exhibition.


[Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-07 08:33:05
<![CDATA[Online exhibition launched in Pakistan shows China’s poverty relief efforts]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/07/content_1487205.htm

The China Cultural Center in Pakistan launched a series of online exhibitions showing China's efforts in poverty relief through developing tourism on Nov 25. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The China Cultural Center in Pakistan launched a series of online exhibitions showing China's efforts in poverty relief through developing tourism on Nov 25.

The four virtual shows feature local tourism sites and customs in 13 provinces and autonomous regions, including Southwest China's Tibet, Northwest China's Qinghai and Central China's Hubei.


The China Cultural Center in Pakistan launched a series of online exhibitions showing China's efforts in poverty relief through developing tourism on Nov 25.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Pakistan launched a series of online exhibitions showing China's efforts in poverty relief through developing tourism on Nov 25.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-12-07 08:24:34
<![CDATA[Hainan film festival rolls out 'blue carpet']]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/06/content_1487202.htm

Visual effects supervisor Christopher Bremble, left, and producer Natacha Devillers walk on the red carpet at the third Hainan Island International Film Festival in Sanya, South China's Hainan province, on Dec 5, 2020. [Photo by ZuoJianan/chinadaily.com.cn]

The third Hainan Island International Film Festival lifted its curtain in the coastal city of Sanya, Hainan province on Dec 5 with a "blue carpet" procession and a grand opening gala.

The annual event was co-hosted by China Media Group and the government of Hainan province, and held at the Rosewood Sanya hotel.

Dancers perform on stage at the opening ceremony gala held in Sanya on Dec 5 for the third Hainan Island International Film Festival. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Among those appearing were Chinese film director Guan Hu; Hong Kong film director, producer, actor, and screenwriter Wong Jing; director and screenwriter Manfred Wong; visual effects supervisor Christopher Bremble; producer Natacha Devillers and Iranian director and screenwriter Majid Majidi.

Addressing the audience at the grand ceremony, Shen Xiaoming, Party chief of Hainan, noted Hainan has attracted high-quality resources from all over the world, creating favorable conditions for the development of the film industry. He added the island is becoming an important platform for cultural exchanges between China and the West, providing rich nourishment for the development of the film industry.


Shen Xiaoming, Party chief of Hainan, addresses the audience at the gala. [Photo by ZuoJianan/chinadaily.com.cn]

A total of 189 works, selected from 4,376 submissions from 114 countries across the world, will be shown in 15 cinemas in Haikou, Sanya, Danzhou and Qionghai through Dec 12.

These films cover several categories, including Gala, World Cinema, Asian Spectrum, China Vista, Reality Matters, Possibilities, Spotlight and Cinema Regained, and nearly 100 will have their world, Asia or China premiere, according to festival organizers.

To focus on global filmmaking newcomers, the third HIIFF introduced the H!Future New Talent Awards in 2020, seeking to motivate new creators and deliver vibrant and diversified offerings to the film industry.

The festival also continues to enhance its own role in promoting film industry development with its H!ActionProject Market, dedicated to coordinating industrial resources supporting filmmakers, promoting mutual cooperation and providing incubation, financing and other services for different stages of film projects.

This year the H!Market, a permanent part of the HIIFF launched in 2019, will feature selected screenings, premieres, the International Best Shooting Scenic Spot Promotion Conference and an Online Film Week.

The festival will be hosted with strict prevention and control measures for COVID-19, according to organizers. Due to the pandemic, there will be outdoor screenings in Sanya and special online screenings of 15 foreign films during the festival’s run.

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2020-12-06 10:53:11
<![CDATA[3rd Hainan intl film festival opens in Sanya]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/05/content_1487201.htm

Chinese actor Guo Tao (left), walks the red carpet at the third Hainan Island International Film Festival in Sanya, South China's Hainan province, on Dec 5, 2020. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The curtain lifted on the 3rd Hainan Island International Film Festival on Saturday with stars walking a blue "red carpet" at the opening ceremony in the coastal city of Sanya.

The festival, held in South China's Hainan province, is dedicated to enhancing international film culture exchange and cooperation, advancing film industry development and promoting proliferation of film creations.


Renowned singer Jeff Chang (L) from China's Taiwan and Loura Lou, the Chinese actress noted for playing Hu Yifei in the hit sitcom television series, iPartment, arrive at the third Hainan Island International Film Festival in Sanya, South China's Hainan province, on Dec 5, 2020. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Thai-Chinese singer MiMi Lee, in a stunning white gown, and Chinese singer Li Zhenning, famous in the Chinese idol survival show, Qing Chun You Ni, stride across the blue "red carpet" at the third Hainan Island International Film Festival in Sanya, South China's Hainan province, on Dec 5, 2020. [Photo by Zuo Jianan/chinadaily.com.cn]


Chinese actress Ma Li, known for her roles in Heart for Heaven and Goodbye Mr. Loser, attends at the opening of the third Hainan Island International Film Festival in Sanya, South China's Hainan province, on Dec 5, 2020. [Photo by Zuo Jianan/chinadaily.com.cn]


Wong Jing (L), a Hong Kong film director, producer, actor, and screenwriter, poses with renowned director and screenwriter Manfred Wong at the third Hainan Island International Film Festival in Sanya, South China's Hainan province, on Dec 5, 2020.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Renowned visual effects supervisor Christopher Bremble (L) and famous producer Natacha Devillers arrive at the third Hainan Island International Film Festival in Sanya, South China's Hainan province, on Dec 5, 2020. [Photo by Zuo Jianan/chinadaily.com.cn]


Chinese film director Guan Hu, whose works include The Eight Hundred, which depicts the defense of a warehouse by a small band of ill-equipped Chinese soldiers during the Japanese invasion of Shanghai in 1937, arrives at the third Hainan Island International Film Festival in Sanya, South China's Hainan province, on Dec 5, 2020. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Famous singer Coco Lee walks on the red carpet of the third Hainan Island International Film Festival in Sanya, South China's Hainan province, on Dec 5, 2020. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Chinese actor Duan Yihong arrives at the third Hainan Island International Film Festival in Sanya, South China's Hainan province, on Dec 5, 2020. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Majid Majidi, an Iranian director, screenwriter and producer who has been nominated for numerous international film awards, including the Academy Award for Best International Feature Film, the Golden Bear at the Berlin Film Festival and the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival, arrives at the third Hainan Island International Film Festival in Sanya, South China's Hainan province, on Dec 5, 2020. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-12-05 23:45:32
<![CDATA[Toying with happiness]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/05/content_1487195.htm

In order to revive the economy, the Lijiang government in Yunnan province encourages the operation of street vendors. Li Bing organizes a charity gig at the local night market. [Photo by Wang Qing/For China Daily]

Ventriloquism requires constant effort, innovation and hard work

Ventriloquist is a not high-profile profession in China, and there are only a handful of people proficient in ventriloquism in China. It is said to have originated in ancient Egypt, with a history of more than 3,000 years. There are also many records about ventriloquism in ancient China, often referred as "belly fairy".

It was also called "belly-talking", but in fact the sounds do not come from inside the belly, rather fluttered through the vocal cords.

Ventriloquism, or ventriloquy, is an act of stagecraft in which a person creates the illusion that their voice is coming from elsewhere, usually a puppet prop, known as a "dummy". Ventriloquists do not move their mouth, and they exert their strength in the abdomen to adjust the breath at different positions of the vocal cords. Sounds are put forth through the breath to create resonance in the nasal and cranial cavity.


Conversing with "Monkey Jack" is Li Bing's daily routine. The performance of ventriloquism is usually based on the amusing interaction between the ventriloquist and the puppet. [Photo by Wang Qing/For China Daily]

Li Bing, a ventriloquist in his 20s, was born in a rural village in Peixian county, Xuzhou, East China's Jiangsu province. In order to ease the burden on his father, Li, who had excellent school grades, gave up the opportunity to go to university and stepped into society early in life to earn a living. Li had worked as a salesperson, construction worker, street vendor, and populace actor. He is incredibly hardworking and often very intelligent, versatile in all sorts of different jobs. Living on his own hands gives him a sense of fulfillment.

The first step in becoming a good ventriloquist is to choose a puppet that matches the character you are trying to create. The artist needs to work on throwing his voice, using a different accent or tone, and speaking without moving his lips. Animating the puppet is another aspect of ventriloquism, so that the artist usually takes effort to practice moving the puppet's mouth and body in time with what he is saying. In time, the artist has to develop a routine and dialogue between himself and the puppet.


Audiences watch Li Bing's performance in front of the City God Temple in Shanghai. [Photo by Wang Qing/For China Daily]

There is no high threshold for learning ventriloquism, nor does it require any basics. Getting it started works well for some people, but many find it hard to maintain when on the go. It takes three to six months to get started with ventriloquism, and at least several years for proficiency.

On one occasion, Li saw a video on the internet in which a foreign ventriloquist performs with skill. The audiences burst into laughter when the artist acted out an episode with his peculiar vocal technique and cute puppet prop. Each gag was rewarded with a generous belly-laugh. What had stricken him from the outset was that something as pervasive as ventriloquism must be a deep part of the story of life itself. Suddenly, it seemed that this was the career he had been looking for in his entire life, and the dream that had been submerged in his mind suddenly resurfaced in reality.


Li Bing keeps running around the cities to perform. These luggage and props are all his belongings. [Photo by Wang Qing/For China Daily]

Li works hard to learn on his own and immerses himself in professional training classes. Soon, with his amazing talent, he mastered the ventriloquism performance skills in a time that others could not. But the essence of mastering the art lies in having good jokes and charisma with the audience, just like a stand-up comic.

Since then, Li and his puppet "Monkey Jack" have been inseparable from each other. Li does not stay in one place for very long, and he is always on the move, sometimes in an amusement park, sometimes in a folk art club, or on the street. He says he is a fan of the street art culture, and he is acquiring a street artist certificate. He is planning to travel around the country while performing the art.


The ancient town of Lijiang attracts young artists across the country. They like to chat with Li Bing. There is always joy in his presence. [Photo by Wang Qing/For China Daily]


Li Bing performs at Qingqu, a local folk art club in Xi'an, Shaanxi province. [Photo by Wang Qing/For China Daily]


After pulling off a performance in Xi'an, Li Bing visits a bookstore to read. [Photo by Wang Qing/For China Daily]

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2020-12-05 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Christmas is your Chinese New Year: Fascinating similarities]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/04/content_1487143.htm "Christmas is your Chinese New Year."

I've heard this phrase uttered to me countless times by people in China when the holidays roll around, whether Christmas or Chinese New Year.

I once thought the comparison a bit of a stretch, wondering how the holiday of Santa Claus of my childhood in the United States could possibly resemble a celebration involving fireworks and lion dances. But over the years I've recognized that Chinese New Year and Christmas share fascinating, and sometimes surprising, commonalities.

Here are some interesting ones I've observed:

Good fortune

Many Chinese New Year customs I've experienced at my in-laws' home in Zhejiang province revolve around auspiciousness, such as the red couplets and firecrackers used to ensure a propitious start to the new year. But Christmas traditions I've grown up with are also said to represent good fortune, including the centerpiece of all decorations: the Christmas tree.

The color red

Red is a beloved shade for Christmas and a lucky one for Chinese New Year.

Marking beginnings

While Chinese New Year signals the start of the new lunar year, Christmas once fell on the exact date of the winter solstice, the shortest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere and a time traditionally marking the "rebirth" of the sun.

Lights

Both Chinese New Year and Christmas dazzle with plenty of lights in decorations and rituals. My father-in-law loves adorning the family home in Zhejiang with traditional red lanterns for Chinese New Year, just as my husband and I enjoy decking our Christmas tree and home with strings of colored lights. Growing up, my family would drive to Christmas light displays in town where we would gaze upon twinkling Santas, reindeer and stars. So naturally, I felt right at home attending my first Lantern Festival in China, surrounded by huge, glowing displays shaped like Chinese zodiac animals.

Spiritual practices

When I was a child, we always attended Christmas Eve mass together as a family at my grandmother's catholic church. During Chinese New Year celebrations at my husband's family home, we always stand before the shrine to the family ancestors on Chinese New Year's Eve and bow with respect before dinner.

Going home to family

Between the holiday song I'll Be Home for Christmas and the Chinese saying "moneyed or not, return home for Chinese New Year" (youqian meiqian huijia guonian), both holiday traditions embrace and promote the idea of family reunions.

Gifts

Whether I'm heading to grandma's house for Christmas Eve or my in-laws' place to spend Chinese New Year's Eve, I always arrive bearing plenty of presents for all.

Food

Food stars as a key ingredient in Chinese New Year and Christmas celebrations. The highlight of guonian at my in-laws' home is feasting on a mouthwatering assortment of dishes from my mother-in-law's kitchen and popping open a bottle of fine red wine. Growing up in the US, I usually sat down along with my family to a dinner of honey-baked ham with all the trimmings on Christmas, and indulged in the many Christmas cookies my mother had either baked or obtained through her annual cookie swaps.

I marvel at these many likenesses between the two seemingly disparate holidays, which I see as a testament to our shared humanity. Whether awaiting the arrival of St. Nicholas or the new Chinese zodiac year, somehow we all innately crave the warmth of celebrations during the coldest days of winter.

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2020-12-04 08:05:00
<![CDATA[Eight masters on display at Liaoning Museum]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/03/content_1487138.htm

The first cultural relics exhibition featuring eight masters of the Tang Dynasty (618-907) and the Song Dynasaty (960-1279) opened on Wednesday at the Liaoning Provincial Museum.

"The eight masters have made a great contribution to our civilization. We experiment to help public watch and enjoy this treasure and appreciate their virtues via the cultural relics," said Dong Baohou, deputy chief of the museum, who is also curator of the exhibition.


Martyn Vladimir (left), a Russian student volunteer from Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, explores China's renowned matrix of ancient culture. [Photo by Jiang Meng/For chinadaily.com.cn]

The eight masters rose to fame in China's history through the returning classic literature movement. Han Yu was an outstanding writer and thinker. Liu Zongyuan was a writer and philosopher. Ouyang Xiu led the innovation movement during the Song Dynasty. Su Xun, together with his two sons Su Shi and Su Zhe, set an example of family education. Su Shi was a genius who excelled at poetry, cooking and traveling. Wang Anshi is an outstanding politician, thinker and writer. He combined writing with political activities and stressed that the first purpose of literature is to serve the country.


Martyn Vladimir (left), a Russian student volunteer from Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, explores China's renowned matrix of ancient culture. [Photo by Jiang Meng/For chinadaily.com.cn]

The eight masters set examples in the fields of poetry, writing, drawing and devotion for the country. And their influence has lasted for centuries.


Martyn Vladimir (right), a Russian student volunteer from Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, explores China's renowned matrix of ancient culture. [Photo by Jiang Meng/For chinadaily.com.cn]

According to the museum, this three-month exhibition consists of three parts to demonstrate articles, good characters and patriotic devotion. A total of 115 relics are on display ‚Ä?drawing, old books and calligraphy works.


Martyn Vladimir, a Russian student volunteer from Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, explores China's renowned matrix of ancient culture. [Photo by Jiang Meng/For chinadaily.com.cn]

There are many international volunteer students at the exhibition. Martyn Vladimir, a Russian student from Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine said, "I admire Su Shi, the famous poet, and I hope I can contribute to cross-cultural communication with my efforts."

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2020-12-03 19:57:11
<![CDATA[Out in Wuxi: discovering China's erhu legend]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/03/content_1487137.htm

Dec 4 marks the 70th anniversary of the death of A Bing, a legendary musician from Wuxi, East China's Jiangsu province. Check out this latest episode of Out in Wuxi to watch our hosts James and Chenyu, as they learn about his life and the local erhu culture.

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2020-12-03 18:52:43
<![CDATA[Online forum covers post-pandemic tourism between China, Morocco]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/03/content_1487131.htm

A forum hosted by China's Ministry of Culture and Tourism and Morocco's Ministry of Tourism, Air Transport, Handicraft and Social Economy themed on tourism cooperation between China and Morocco was held online Wednesday via a digital media platform. Over 150 participants from the tourism sector, diplomatic service and research institutions of the two countries attended the conference.

The event was comprised of keynote speeches, a panel discussion, tourism promotion and online exhibitions. Against the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic this year, participants exchanged opinions on measures that could be implemented to facilitate a full recovery in the travel industry, as well as the prospects for future cooperation in the tourism sector between China and Morocco in the post-pandemic era.

Zhang Xu, Chinese vice-minister of Culture and Tourism, delivered a speech at the event and said the forum aims to bring together wisdom and experience, while the core is to focus on new trends and growth points for Sino-Moroccan tourism cooperation that emerged after the outbreak of the pandemic. The forum was a significant event in reinvigorating the cultural and people-to-people exchanges between the two countries, and hopefully a more strategic and pragmatic partnership in the sector of tourism cooperation between China and Morocco will be upgraded to a new level, Zhang said.

Nadia Fettah Alaoui, minister of Tourism, Air Transport, Handicraft and Social Economy of Morocco, said in a speech that as two great civilizations, China and Morocco have a long-standing and time-honored friendship. Tourism cooperation between China and Morocco has been especially close in recent years. Tourism is a pillar industry of Morocco and is a pivotal cooperation sector in the Belt and Road Initiative. As the biggest inbound tourism country in Africa and the largest outbound tourism country in the world, Morocco and China, respectively, should push forward deeper cooperation between the two countries.

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2020-12-03 15:45:58
<![CDATA[Exhibition reflects history of mirrors]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/03/content_1487135.htm

Mirrors of Eternity, an exhibition at the National Museum of China, offers a glimpse of the richness and diversity of bronze mirrors made in ancient China. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

A mirrors is not only a common apparatus in daily life. It also reflects techniques, aesthetics and lifestyles.

Vintage mirrors form a large category in the collection of the National Museum of China in Beijing, the oldest dating back to the late stage of the Neolithic Age. 

Mirrors of Eternity, an exhibition at the National Museum through March 24, offers a glimpse of the richness and diversity of bronze mirrors made in ancient China.

On show are more than 260 such fine objects from the museum's collection, which over an overview of the progress of bronze melting and casting techniques over centuries. They also reveal the cultural implications and moral beliefs embodied in mirrors, as well as exchanges between ancient China and the world.


Mirrors of Eternity, an exhibition at the National Museum of China, offers a glimpse of the richness and diversity of bronze mirrors made in ancient China. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Mirrors of Eternity, an exhibition at the National Museum of China, offers a glimpse of the richness and diversity of bronze mirrors made in ancient China. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Mirrors of Eternity, an exhibition at the National Museum of China, offers a glimpse of the richness and diversity of bronze mirrors made in ancient China. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Mirrors of Eternity, an exhibition at the National Museum of China, offers a glimpse of the richness and diversity of bronze mirrors made in ancient China. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Mirrors of Eternity, an exhibition at the National Museum of China, offers a glimpse of the richness and diversity of bronze mirrors made in ancient China. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

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2020-12-03 16:24:05
<![CDATA[Exhibition reviews progress of drawings over the century]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/03/content_1487134.htm

A draft by Luo Zhongli for his iconic oil painting Father. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Making drawings is not only a basic practice for artists to hone their techniques,,they are also seen as works of art in their own right.

Chinese Drawing, an exhibition now underway at the National Museum of China in Beijing through Jan 30, teams up modern and contemporary artists whose drawings show the evolution of Chinese art throughout the 20th century.

Works on show include those by masters such as Xu Beihong and Pan Yuliang, who were among the first generation of Chinese studying and living in Europe and helped introduce Western art and build a modern art education system at home.

Drawings by well-established artists in the 1940s and throughout the '70s show the dominant style of socialist realism, where members of the working class were recurring subjects.

Works since the 1980s have taken a more diverse tack, reflecting the co-existence of different approaches to art and concepts.


A drawing by Jin Shangyi [Photo provided to China Daily]


A drawing by Liu Wanming [Photo provided to China Daily]


A Zazak nomad by Chang Shuhong [Photo provided to China Daily]


Deep in Thought by Gu Shengyue [Photo provided to China Daily]


Mother and Daughter in Law by Wu Birui [Photo provided to China Daily]


Self-portrait by Pan He [Photo provided to China Daily]


Soldier by Gu Yuan [Photo provided to China Daily]


Taming Bull by Huang Zhou [Photo provided to China Daily]


Villager by Zhao Jiancheng [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-03 16:20:50
<![CDATA[Exhibition at art academy rewards up-and-coming teachers]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/03/content_1487133.htm

Oil painter Jin Shangyi (left) and Fan Di'an dean of Central Academy of Fine Arts at the exhibition. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The Central Academy of Fine Arts launched an award and exhibition, named after eminent oil painter Jin Shangyi, in 2019 to encourage the development of up-and-coming teachers at the academy.

The second edition of the awards honored Jiao Yang and Chen Zhuo, whose works are now on show at CAFA until Dec 15.

Jiao works with classical ink painting in the meticulous gongbi style. Her paintings are on pace with social changes, such as the transformation of old industrial compounds and over-consumption.

Chen creates images, videos, films and multimedia works to share his examinations of history and the world.


The Central Academy of Fine Arts launched an award and exhibition, named after eminent oil painter Jin Shangyi, in 2019 to encourage creation of up-and-coming teachers at the academy. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The second edition of the awards was given to Jiao Yang and Chen Zhuo whose works are now on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The second edition of the awards was given to Jiao Yang and Chen Zhuo whose works are now on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The second edition of the awards was given to Jiao Yang and Chen Zhuo whose works are now on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-03 15:52:28
<![CDATA[Ink paintings on show present a floral fantasy]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/03/content_1487132.htm

A Floral World, Wu Shuang's solo exhibition now in Zhengzhou, shows her endeavor in painting and her passion with flowers. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

Trained in Nanjing, Beijing and Macao, female artist Wu Shuang has been nurtured by a variety of art forms and styles. She has been working with colored ink paintings recently, exploring a rich color scheme to carry on the tradition of classical Chinese ink art.

A Floral World, Wu's solo exhibition now on at the Zhengzhou International Cultural and Creative Industry Park in Zhengzhou, Henan province, shows her endeavors in painting and her passion for flowers.

Flowers are an inseparable part of Wu's life and work. She decorates her home and studio with flowers, and her works show a floral fantasy world to bring viewers warmth and delight.

The exhibition until Jan 18 also shows bronze sculptures by Wu's father and esteemed sculptor Wu Weishan. The works by father and daughter present a contrast between reality and fantasy.


A Floral World, Wu Shuang's solo exhibition now in Zhengzhou, shows her endeavor in painting and her passion with flowers. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


The exhibition also shows bronze sculptures by Wu's father and esteemed sculptor Wu Weishan. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


The exhibition also shows bronze sculptures by Wu's father and esteemed sculptor Wu Weishan. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Wu Shuang is nurtured by a variety of art forms and styles. She has been working with colored ink painting. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-03 15:48:18
<![CDATA[Online exhibition introduces thangka to South Korea]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/03/content_1487125.htm

The China Cultural Center in Seoul launched an online exhibition showing Chinese thangka works on its website, Nov 27, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The China Cultural Center in Seoul launched an online exhibition showing Chinese thangka works on its website.

The event showcases 122 pieces of ancient and modern thangka works and shares their history, protection and inheritance.

An important part of the center’s Tibetan culture promotion activities, the exhibition is available here.


The China Cultural Center in Seoul launched an online exhibition showing Chinese thangka works on its website, Nov 27, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Seoul launched an online exhibition showing Chinese thangka works on its website, Nov 27, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Seoul launched an online exhibition showing Chinese thangka works on its website, Nov 27, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Seoul launched an online exhibition showing Chinese thangka works on its website, Nov 27, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Seoul launched an online exhibition showing Chinese thangka works on its website, Nov 27, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Seoul launched an online exhibition showing Chinese thangka works on its website, Nov 27, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Seoul launched an online exhibition showing Chinese thangka works on its website, Nov 27, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-12-03 14:47:56
<![CDATA[New Zealand boys learn to make traditional Chinese food]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/03/content_1487118.htm

Boys from Wellesley College are making spring rolls, a traditional Chinese food, at a workshop. The China Cultural Center in Wellington invited local Chinese chefs to teach the students to make the snacks in Wellington, New Zealand, Nov 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Boys from Wellesley College are making spring rolls, a traditional Chinese food, at a workshop. The China Cultural Center in Wellington invited local Chinese chefs to teach the students to make the snacks in Wellington, New Zealand, Nov 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Boys from Wellesley College are making spring rolls, a traditional Chinese food, at a workshop. The China Cultural Center in Wellington invited local Chinese chefs to teach the students to make the snacks in Wellington, New Zealand, Nov 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Boys from Wellesley College are making spring rolls, a traditional Chinese food, at a workshop. The China Cultural Center in Wellington invited local Chinese chefs to teach the students to make the snacks in Wellington, New Zealand, Nov 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Boys from Wellesley College are making spring rolls, a traditional Chinese food, at a workshop. The China Cultural Center in Wellington invited local Chinese chefs to teach the students to make the snacks in Wellington, New Zealand, Nov 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Boys from Wellesley College are making spring rolls, a traditional Chinese food, at a workshop. The China Cultural Center in Wellington invited local Chinese chefs to teach the students to make the snacks in Wellington, New Zealand, Nov 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Boys from Wellesley College are making spring rolls, a traditional Chinese food, at a workshop. The China Cultural Center in Wellington invited local Chinese chefs to teach the students to make the snacks in Wellington, New Zealand, Nov 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Boys from Wellesley College are making spring rolls, a traditional Chinese food, at a workshop. The China Cultural Center in Wellington invited local Chinese chefs to teach the students to make the snacks in Wellington, New Zealand, Nov 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Boys from Wellesley College are making spring rolls, a traditional Chinese food, at a workshop. The China Cultural Center in Wellington invited local Chinese chefs to teach the students to make the snacks in Wellington, New Zealand, Nov 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Boys from Wellesley College are making spring rolls, a traditional Chinese food, at a workshop. The China Cultural Center in Wellington invited local Chinese chefs to teach the students to make the snacks in Wellington, New Zealand, Nov 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

 

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2020-12-03 13:52:04
<![CDATA[Publication featuring Zhihua Temple music released in Beijing]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/03/content_1487111.htm

A multimedia publication featuring the intangible cultural heritage-Zhihua Temple's Classical Music of Beijing has been jointly launched on Dec 2 by the Chinese National Academy of Arts and the Culture and Art Press.

Renowned as a "living fossil" of ancient Chinese music, Zhihua Temple music is a repertoire of both music and religious rituals passed down for more than 500 years. It is a combination of imperial court music, Buddhist music and folk tunes, most of which are songs celebrating Buddhist events.

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2020-12-03 11:43:34
<![CDATA[Discover colorful Xinjiang in NW China]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/10/content_1486131.htm

Northwest China's Xinjiang is spread over a vast land, covering an area of 1.66 million square kilometers, or one-sixth of the total land area of China.

Diverse geographical features, rich culture and unique cuisines have made Xinjiang one of the most popular destinations in China in recent years, and tourism has become a pillar industry.

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2020-11-10 09:03:16
<![CDATA[Exhibition spotlights master calligrapher and theorist]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/03/content_1487070.htm

A calligraphic character 'long' (dragon) written by Sha Menghai on show. [Photo by Yu Lingling/China Daily]

The late master calligrapher and seal carver Sha Menghai, who hailed from Yinzhou, Zhejiang province, is acknowledged for his robust but controlled style, his dedication to calligraphy education, and his theoretical accomplishments in the studies of ancient Chinese writings and Chinese cultural traditions. 

He was also the fourth president of the renowned Xiling Seal Engraver's Society in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province. 

Zealous and Genuine, an exhibition now on at the National Art Museum of China until Sunday, reviews Sha's all-around achievements in memory of the 120th anniversary of his birth.

On show are his calligraphic works, seals he carved with ancient Chinese characters, manuscripts and documents, reflecting his passion as a committed scholar, artist and scholar.


A photo shows Sha Menghai demonstrated calligraphy in 1979. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A photo shows Sha Menghai demonstrated calligraphy in 1983. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A statue of Sha Menghai on show. [Photo by Yu Lingling/China Daily]


Sha Menghai is acknowledged for his robust and meanwhile controlled style of calligraphy. [Photo by Yu Lingling/China Daily] 


Sha Menghai is acknowledged for his robust and meanwhile controlled style of calligraphy. [Photo by Yu Lingling/China Daily]


Sha Menghai is acknowledged for his robust and meanwhile controlled style of calligraphy. [Photo by Yu Lingling/China Daily]

Sha Menghai is acknowledged for his robust and meanwhile controlled style of calligraphy. [Photo by Yu Lingling/China Daily]


Sha Menghai is acknowledged for his robust and meanwhile controlled style of calligraphy. [Photo by Yu Lingling/China Daily]


Sha Menghai is acknowledged for his robust and meanwhile controlled style of calligraphy. [Photo by Yu Lingling/China Daily]


Zealous and Genuine, an exhibition at the National Art Museum of China until Sunday, reviews Sha Menghai's all-rounded achievements in memory of the 120th anniversary of his birth. [Photo by Lin Yinhai/China Daily]


Zealous and Genuine, an exhibition at the National Art Museum of China until Sunday, reviews Sha Menghai's all-rounded achievements in memory of the 120th anniversary of his birth. [Photo by Lin Yinhai/China Daily]


Zealous and Genuine, an exhibition at the National Art Museum of China until Sunday, reviews Sha Menghai's all-rounded achievements in memory of the 120th anniversary of his birth. [Photo by Lin Yinhai/China Daily]


Zealous and Genuine, an exhibition at the National Art Museum of China until Sunday, reviews Sha Menghai's all-rounded achievements in memory of the 120th anniversary of his birth. [Photo by Lin Yinhai/China Daily]

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2020-12-03 10:21:23
<![CDATA[New stamps issued in memory of Engels]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/03/content_1487069.htm

China Post issues a set of two stamps marking the 200th anniversary of the birth of Engels (1820-95). The stamps are designed by Wu Weishan. [Photo provided to China Daily]

China Post issued a set of two stamps on Nov 28, marking the 200th anniversary of the birth of German socialist philosopher Friedrich Engels (1820-95).

The stamps each bear a face price of 1.2 yuan (18 cents). One shows drawings of a young Engels against the background of his family house, and the other depicts an older Engels, with thick beard, in the middle of writing, as well as Chinese covers of The Communist Manifesto and Das Kapital in the back.

The drawings were made by Wu Weishan, director of the National Art Museum of China and a sculptor who created statues of Marx and Engels.

China Post issues a set of two stamps marking the 200th anniversary of the birth of Engels (1820-95). The stamps are designed by Wu Weishan. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-03 10:12:32
<![CDATA[Speech honors scholar, generous art connoisseur]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/03/content_1487067.htm

A bronze bell of the Warring States Period (475-221 BC) from Rong Geng's fomer collection on show. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

Late esteemed scholar and collector Rong Geng once taught for years at the Sun Yat-Sen University in Guangzhou where his academic depth has nurtured generations of scholars of ancient Chinese writings including Chen Yingjie.

Chen, who graduated from Sun Yat-Sen and is now a professor of Capital Normal University in Beijing, recently gave a speech at the National Art Museum of China in Beijing, sharing details of the life and work of Rong.

The talk was held on the sidelines of Mr. Rong's Great World, an exhibition at the National Art Museum of China until Dec 7. It shows Rong's artworks and his former collections of antiquity, which are now housed at public museums, reflecting his academic achievements and generosity to share his love with the public.


A bronze gui food receptacle and lid of Zhou Dynasty (c.11th century-256 BC) from Rong Geng's fomer collection on show. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A bronze gui food receptacle and lid of Zhou Dynasty (c.11th century-256 BC) from Rong Geng's fomer collection on show. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A painting by Rong Geng on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A painting by Wang Xuetao from Rong Geng's fomer collection on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A rare bronze "fou" jar inlaid with gold and of more than 2,200 years old from Rong Geng's fomer collection on show. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Bronze cymbals of Shang Dynasty (c.16th century-11th century BC) from Rong Geng's fomer collection on show. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Bronze cymbals of Shang Dynasty (c.16th century-11th century BC) from Rong Geng's fomer collection on show. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Pine and Plum Trees, a painting by Guan Shanyue and from Rong Geng's fomer collection on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The manuscript of Rong Geng's Investigation of Inscriptions on Ancient Bronzes, first published in 1923, on show. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

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2020-12-03 10:09:42
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Retreat is the Best Option]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/03/content_1487061.htm

Zou wei shang ji, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes the act to avoid traps by simply walking way. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-12-03 09:05:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Lead Your Adversary to Chain Together Their Warships]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/03/content_1487060.htm

Lian huan ji, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes a set of interlocking strategies that ties the enemy to defeat. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-12-03 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Questions of identity amid digitally rendered realities]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/03/content_1487063.htm

Visitors donning headsets create countless hands in a virtual world. Using the hands, they can explore their superpowers, such as climbing high into the sky or diving into deep water. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Questions about personal identity are becoming more difficult to answer as people spend more time in the virtual world.

A recently launched show using extended reality, or XR, technologies in Beijing seeks to explore these issues.

Negotiable Matters: Identities presents six works employing virtual reality, augmented reality or mixed reality at the Goethe-Institut China in Beijing, allowing visitors to immerse themselves in an environment that blends virtual and physical realities.

Co-curator Che Lin says each work provides a perspective for audiences to reflect on identity.

"Technologies featured in these works open up a world of possibilities, free of any constraints," Che says.

The Real Thing is a VR film that brings visitors into Chinese cities that feature Western monuments, such as the Eiffel Tower and London Bridge.

The VR work transports audiences into an environment that blends local landscapes and replicas of iconic Western structures.

Work of VVVR is a voice-controlled tool that allows people to "see" their voices transformed into geometric patterns as they speak.

It enables two people sitting opposite to each other to interact in a virtual space through their voices-or to be more exact, through the voices translated into changing shapes and colors flowing from their mouths-by wearing VR headsets.

Another highlight is the interactive work, HANAHANA, by French artist Melodie Mousset, a pioneer in the field of art and new media.

Visitors can don headsets to create countless hands in different sizes and colors in a virtual world. They can walk around, exploring their superpowers, such as climbing high into the sky or diving into deep water, using the hands they design.

The works were created by artists from around the world, including those from such countries as Switzerland, Italy and France.

None of the artists were able to attend the show's opening on Nov 21 because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Also, visitor numbers are restricted to 13 every two hours due to limited space and equipment.

Feng Shuo, one of the show's organizers with the Goethe-Institut China, says it's a pity that only a few people interested in new technologies and art can enjoy the immersive experiences they provide. Only 400 viewers can make appointments per week.

She says they've prepared for the show for a long time, and it's a rare chance for Chinese art lovers to experience six XR works in one show.

The last VR exhibition she saw featured oil painter Yu Hong's VR work two years ago.

Che says VR and XR shows are relatively new to China, and it's expensive to organize such exhibits because of equipment and space.

But more artists from home and abroad are embracing new technologies.

Some artists in the show are tech-savvy. For instance, Bodyless' producer Hsin-Chien Huang is good at programming and algorithms. His work lets viewers experience an old man's life through his eyes.

Che says the tech used in Negotiable Matters provides a perfect chance for viewers to change their identities and see life from other perspectives.

"When they come back to the reality, maybe they can reflect more on themselves," she says.

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2020-12-03 08:10:00
<![CDATA[China meets Italy at fashion summit]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/02/content_1487057.htm

A fashion show featuring 30 leading Chinese brands and a number of Italian brands was staged in Qingdao, Shandong province, on Sunday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The 2020 China Stone (Qingdao) International Fashion Industry Summit and Sino-Italian Fashion Matchmaking Meeting were held in Qingdao, Shandong province, on Sunday.

An eye-catching fashion show was staged during the event, with 30 leading Chinese brands and a number of Italian brands all showing their sartorial splendor.

Meanwhile, the International Fashion Industry Internet Center was inaugurated and settled in the city's Shinan district.


A fashion show featuring 30 leading Chinese brands and a number of Italian brands was staged in Qingdao, Shandong province, on Sunday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A fashion show featuring 30 leading Chinese brands and a number of Italian brands was staged in Qingdao, Shandong province, on Sunday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A fashion show featuring 30 leading Chinese brands and a number of Italian brands was staged in Qingdao, Shandong province, on Sunday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A fashion show featuring 30 leading Chinese brands and a number of Italian brands was staged in Qingdao, Shandong province, on Sunday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A fashion show featuring 30 leading Chinese brands and a number of Italian brands was staged in Qingdao, Shandong province, on Sunday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A fashion show featuring 30 leading Chinese brands and a number of Italian brands was staged in Qingdao, Shandong province, on Sunday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A fashion show featuring 30 leading Chinese brands and a number of Italian brands was staged in Qingdao, Shandong province, on Sunday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A fashion show featuring 30 leading Chinese brands and a number of Italian brands was staged in Qingdao, Shandong province, on Sunday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A fashion show featuring 30 leading Chinese brands and a number of Italian brands was staged in Qingdao, Shandong province, on Sunday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A fashion show featuring 30 leading Chinese brands and a number of Italian brands was staged in Qingdao, Shandong province, on Sunday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-12-02 17:18:48
<![CDATA[Getting married? Pick a tradition]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/02/content_1487056.htm

Rituals of traditional Chinese weddings were presented during a show in Lanzhou, Gansu province, on Sunday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

A unique wedding show was staged at a hotel in Lanzhou, Gansu province, on Sunday, featuring traditional Chinese clothing and rituals.

Initiated by the Lanzhou culture and tourism department, the show presented a combination of cultures ‚Ä?modern and traditional ‚Ä?attracting about 100 couples.

The show allowed the audience to appreciate the unique charms of guochao, a style whose popularity is trending upward among young people in domestic brands and products that incorporate traditional Chinese elements, organizers said.

Besides the dresses, traditional rituals of Chinese weddings were also staged at the event.

Zhou Jiaxin contributed to the story.


A unique wedding show was staged at a hotel in Lanzhou, Gansu province, on Sunday, featuring traditional Chinese clothing and rituals. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A unique wedding show was staged at a hotel in Lanzhou, Gansu province, on Sunday, featuring traditional Chinese clothing and rituals. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A unique wedding show was staged at a hotel in Lanzhou, Gansu province, on Sunday, featuring traditional Chinese clothing and rituals. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A unique wedding show was staged at a hotel in Lanzhou, Gansu province, on Sunday, featuring traditional Chinese clothing and rituals. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-12-02 17:07:14
<![CDATA[American Pistachio Growers hosts online event for Chinese customers]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/02/content_1487052.htm

A dish using pistachios. [Phot provided to China Daily]

American Pistachio Growers, the trade association for the United States pistachio industry, host an online event to showcases this year's harvest and shared with Chinese customers on Thursday.

Pistachio grower Richard Kreps showcased his fields in California with the audience through cameras.

According to Judy Hirigoyen, vice-president at American Pistachio Growers, China has become the largest export market for American pistachios in the past few years and their pistachios can be found in many supermarkets and online retail platforms in China.

She said that as the holiday season is coming, pistachios can be a good present for families to share and she hoped the American pistachios can bring more nutrition and happiness to Chinese families and customers.

Chinese American chef Martin Yan shared two pistachio dish recipes during the online event.

Chef Martin Yen shared two pistachio dish recipes during the online event. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-12-02 13:54:35
<![CDATA[Double the art]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/02/content_1487051.htm

Hong Hao, Edged‚ÄďWorld No.29,2020, acrylic and molding material on canvas, 140 x 140cm [Photo/¬©Pace Gallery/¬©Hong Hao/provided to China Daily]

Seldom has the art scene in Hong Kong been so dynamic and proactive as it was in the last ten months, with pop-up and fast-fit solutions to counteract the dilemma of postponed and cancelled shows. Numerous highlights emerged, with the Ying Kwok-curated Unscheduled at Tai Kwun in June becoming a new franchise-in-the-making along the way.

Now comes the year's big-ticket entrant to the market, as Fine Art Asia 2020 will host Hong Kong Spotlight by Art Basel ‚Ä?a new platform showcasing the work of 22 galleries, all of which run spaces in the city and have exhibited at previous editions of Art Basel in Hong Kong. Held from November 27 to 30, it will be Art Basel's first and last physical presentation of the year, after cancelling shows in Hong Kong (March), Basel (May) and Miami (December). The fair is expected to resume normal service next year when it revisits the city in March for Art Basel in Hong Kong.


Lee Bul, Perdu XLV, 2020, mother-of-pearl, acrylic paint on wooden base panel, steel frame, 163.3 x 113.3 x 6.6cm [Photo/Courtesy Studio Lee Bul and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, Seoul and London]

Among the highlights are a first solo show in Hong Kong of paintings by Korean artist Lee Bul at Lehmann Maupin, in which the artist will show recent work from her Perdu series, exploring the binary between the artificial and the organic. 10 Chancery Lane Gallery will promote a sculpture-only booth via works in bronze and wood by Wang Keping, and gravity-defying bamboo creations that swing and draw curves through the air in calligraphic fashion by Laurent Martin "Lo". Perrotin's booth will be dominated by an eight-metre Eddie Martinez canvas as well as a number of works on cardboard that the artist is debuting with the gallery.


Stephen Wong Chun-hei, The Autumn Walk, 2020, acrylic on canvas, 40 x 50cm [Photo/Courtesy of Gallery Exit and the artist]

Gallery Exit will show new works by Stephen Wong Chun-hei, who invites gallery-goers to contemplate the complex relationship between humans, nature and virtual reality; Simon Lee Gallery will exhibit works from Jim Shaw's Man Machine series, which stems from the artist's interest in hair as a source of power; and Axel Vervoordt Gallery brings the circular-shaped patterns of renowned female Japanese artist Yuko Nasaka, one of the most prominent voices of Gutai's second generation.

"Our collaboration with Fine Art Asia will be a wonderful opportunity for the Hong Kong cultural community to come together and celebrate the creative spirit of the city," says Adeline Ooi, Art Basel's director for Asia. "Art Basel is dedicated to supporting the region, and we are therefore delighted that we are able to provide a physical platform for galleries and their artists in what has been a challenging year."


Jim Shaw , Blender Man,2020, acrylic on muslin, 83.8 x 71.1 x 4.4cm [Photo/Courtesy of the artist and Simon Lee Gallery]

Angelle Siyang-Le, Art Basel's project lead on Hong Kong Spotlight and the regional head of gallery relations for Asia, adds: "Hong Kong Spotlight is a special occasion for our Hong Kong exhibitors to present their premier programme and an opportunity for the art community to exchange ideas. I'm excited to see a great line-up of exhibitors for the project and look forward to seeing artists' works in person again."

Hong Kong Spotlight's line-up of 22 innovative galleries in the city includes 10 Chancery Lane Gallery, Ben Brown Fine Arts, Massimo De Carlo, Empty Gallery, Gallery Exit, Gagosian, Kwai Fung Hin Art Gallery, Pearl Lam Galleries, Simon Lee Gallery, Lehmann Maupin, Lévy Gorvy, Contemporary by Angela Li, Edouard Malingue Gallery, Galerie du Monde, Nanzuka, Anna Ning Fine Art, Galerie Ora-Ora, Pace Gallery, Perrotin, de Sarthe, Tang Contemporary Art and Axel Vervoordt Gallery.

Hong Kong Spotlight; November 27-30;Venue Hall 3F & 3G, Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, 1 Harbour Road, Wan Chai; artbasel.com/hkspotlight


 

Eddie Martinez, Untitled, 2020, acrylic paint, oil paint, spray paint, baby wipe collage and oil bar on canvas; suite of three canvases, 194 x 777cm (overall), 194 x 259cm (each) [Photo/©Eddie Martinez; courtesy of the artist and Perrotin]


Laurent Martin "Lo", Smoke, 2019, weather-beaten bamboo, fishing thread, copper and lead, ceramic ball, 210 x 90 x 80cm, rotation diameter 110cm [Photo/Courtesy of the artist and 10 Chancery Lane]


Yuko Nasaka, Untitled, 1966, synthetic paint, plaster and glue on cotton, mounted on wooden board, 23.5 x 23.5cm [Photo/Courtesy of the artist and Axel Vervoordt Gallery]

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2020-12-02 13:33:21
<![CDATA[Hangzhou steamed buns prove popular in Tibet]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/02/content_1487027.htm As Shang Wangli tied an apron on and got down to work, much of the city was still fast asleep.

Running a small restaurant named "Hangzhou Steamed Buns" in Lhasa, capital of Southwest China's Tibet autonomous region, Shang and her husband have found not only comfort in nostalgia, but also the promise of a prosperous future.

The couple came to Lhasa about two years ago from the city of Shengzhou in East China's Zhejiang province, bringing the famous Hangzhou snack -- steamed stuffed buns -- to people living on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

The popular east-coast snack remains a niche product in Lhasa, where Tibetan and Sichuan cuisines dominate the dining tables. The couple saw this as a potential business opportunity, albeit thousands of miles away from home.

"In my hometown, steamed buns are just breakfast food," Shang said. "But in Lhasa, they are also eaten for lunch and dinner, and our restaurant can stay open until late at night."

To keep costs under control, Shang did not hire any employees at her family-run restaurant. The couple did everything themselves, from purchasing ingredients and cooking to the dine-in service.

"Sometimes we would take shifts when one of us was tired out. It's no easy task to start a business, and we have to be hard-working," she said.

Steam buns are traditionally cooked in bamboo steamers, but the lower atmospheric pressure in Lhasa -- which lies at an elevation of 3,600 meters -- makes this difficult, because water boils at a lower temperature.

Therefore, the couple used a pressure cooker to steam the buns, which brought a special new taste to the Zhejiang cuisine.

"Buns made in a pressure cooker have soft and fluffy skins, as well as tender and tasty meat fillings," said a Sichuan customer who was visiting Lhasa.

The couple also provided free hot water, Wi-Fi coverage and a neat and tidy dining environment at their tiny restaurant, which has gradually attracted many regular customers from the neighborhood.

It took Shang some time to communicate properly with some of the older local inhabitants who could not understand Mandarin. Nonetheless, she was always patient in providing information on the menu, sometimes using pictures or even body language.

"To be frank, before we came to Lhasa, we used to have plenty to be anxious and uncertain about," Shang recalled.

However, she found life in Lhasa is just as convenient as in other places, and it is not hard for non-locals to get set up. "Now there are more people from my hometown who come here to do business."

Tibet has been improving its transportation infrastructure, logistics and business environment in recent years, providing more opportunities for new settlers like Shang in catering, retail and tourism businesses.

"Our business is quite good. We can earn up to 30,000 yuan (about $4,563) a month now," Shang said. "We're not actually dreaming big; our goal is just to put away some money to provide for ourselves and our kid."

Shang turned on the lights, opened the door and went back to her small kitchen. There, she busily prepared more steamed buns, in good time for her first customers of the morning.

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2020-12-02 10:37:47
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Inflict Pain on Oneself to Infiltrate the Enemy's Camp and Win the Enemy's Confidence]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/02/content_1486941.htm

Ku rou ji, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes the act to guilt trip others. 
Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-12-02 09:05:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Use Adversary's Spies to Sow Discord in the Enemy Camp]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/02/content_1486940.htm

Fan jian ji, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to spread misinformation through counter-espionage. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-12-02 09:00:17
<![CDATA[List of major Great Wall sections released]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/01/content_1486937.htm

The National Cultural Heritage Administration released its first list of major national-level sections of the Great Wall on Thursday, which included four ruins from the Tang Dynasty (618-907) in the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The National Cultural Heritage Administration released its first list of major national-level sections of the Great Wall on Thursday, which included four ruins from the Tang Dynasty (618-907) in the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region.


The National Cultural Heritage Administration released its first list of major national-level sections of the Great Wall on Thursday, which included four ruins from the Tang Dynasty (618-907) in the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The list covers sections that were erected during the Qin Dynasty (221-206 BC), the Han Dynasty (206 BC- AD220) and the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). They are closely related to historical events, including the War of Resistance Against Japanese Aggression (1931-45), and include major bastions and beacon towers. The list enrolled a total of 83 ruins.


The National Cultural Heritage Administration released its first list of major national-level sections of the Great Wall on Thursday, which included four ruins from the Tang Dynasty (618-907) in the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Four of the ruins are located in Xinjiang, which not only functioned as military garrisons but also transportation hubs. Paper documents, wooden structures and other excavations have been unearthed.


The National Cultural Heritage Administration released its first list of major national-level sections of the Great Wall on Thursday, which included four ruins from the Tang Dynasty (618-907) in the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

According to Xinjiang's cultural relics department, 212 sections of the Great Wall are distributed throughout Xinjiang.

Zhou Jiaxin contributed to the story.

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2020-12-01 08:19:53
<![CDATA[ 2020 Sharing China ]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020sharingchina/photos.html

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2020-12-02 10:09:26
<![CDATA[A Chinese Lens: Li Shaobai]]> http://www.labprosper.com/achineselens/lishaobai.html

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2020-12-02 10:06:29
<![CDATA[Beautiful China]]> http://www.labprosper.com/beautifulchina.html

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2020-12-02 10:03:07
<![CDATA[Festive China]]> http://www.labprosper.com/node_50013344.htm

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2020-12-02 09:54:15
<![CDATA[Culture Talk]]> http://www.labprosper.com/node_50013346.htm

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2020-12-02 09:51:50
<![CDATA[36 Strategies]]> http://www.labprosper.com/node_50013345.htm

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2020-12-02 09:47:11
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Open the Gate of an Undefended City]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/01/content_1486906.htm

Kong cheng ji, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to fool the enemy into doubting himself and overestimating you. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-12-01 09:05:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Use a Beauty to Ensnare a Man]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/01/content_1486905.htm

Mei ren ji, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to use seduction to achieve a goal. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-12-01 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Miyun sets sites on new visitor targets]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-12/01/content_1486907.htm

A travel route featuring the Great Wall's Simatai section in Miyun, an original section of the Great Wall dating back to the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). [Photo provided to China Daily]

Beijing's Miyun district has rolled out favorable policies and major projects to boost tourism and cultural development.

The district will support distinctive homestays, rural-tourism destinations, museums, libraries and bookstores to become a demonstration zone for culture, travel and leisure experiences in 2021, it said at a tourism-development conference on Nov 18.

The meeting aimed to boost quality tourism development and carry out the spirit of President Xi Jinping's call for continued efforts to preserve Miyun Reservoir, the major source of drinking water for Beijing, and fully advance the building of an ecological civilization.

Businesses that invest at least 50 million yuan ($7.6 million) in the above-mentioned sectors will be awarded 1 percent of the actual investment amount. Top-rated homestays and hotels will be granted prize money ranging from 100,000 to 500,000 yuan, based on the district's policy.

"We will tap into local culture and develop courses for family travelers," says Yin Wenhuan, who runs Shanli Lohas, a cluster of hotels in a village in Miyun, where the hotel exteriors have retained their old look. The village is nestled in a valley and has only one way in and out.

"They will live and experience farming here," Yin says.

Beijing Enterprises Group will invest in the construction of a boutique hotel next year, says Li Yongcheng, a senior official with the company.

"We've focused on developing rural tourism, based on Miyun's characteristics," Li says.

The Beijing company is already involved in some homestay construction in Miyun. Those projects will be completed at the end of this year, according to Li.

The company will continue working with Miyun's plan to contribute to the district's ecological and tourism development, Li says. "We have many good cooperation and investment opportunities here."

History and cultural elements will be the focus for eastern Miyun, while the western areas will offer more experiences reminiscent of the country's revolutionary history. Northern Miyun will abound in farming and camping tourism resources, while fashion, sports and pastoral charm will be found in the south.

A travel route featuring the district's Gubeikou Great Wall will be developed to cover study, leisure and sports elements for travelers.

In addition, local water and fishing culture will be integrated with tourism. Homestays and other tourism-service facilities will be arranged along the marathon tracks meandering through Miyun's forest.

The district is striving to increase the income of its major scenic spots by 40 percent year-on-year to 826 million yuan by the end of next year, according to Ge Jungai, head of Miyun's publicity department.

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2020-12-01 08:10:00
<![CDATA[Media tour of Beijing Municipal Administrative Center concludes]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/30/content_1486901.htm

Media professionals are introduced to the craft of traditional silk figurines in the shape of Peking opera characters in the Tongzhou district of Beijing on Nov 29, 2020.[Photo by Zhu Xingxin/China Daily]

A three-day media tour of the Beijing Municipal Administrative Center came to an end yesterday in the capital city's Tongzhou district. Organized by the Photojournalist Society of China, participants from over 100 media outlets fully experienced the city’s traditional culture and witnessed the achievements of the local economic and social sectors.


Media professionals are introduced to the craft of traditional silk figurines in the shape of Peking opera characters in the Tongzhou district of Beijing on Nov 29, 2020.[Photo by Zhu Xingxin/China Daily]


A three-day media tour of the Beijing Municipal Administrative Center came to an end yesterday in the capital city's Tongzhou district. Organized by the Photojournalist Society of China, participants from over 100 media outlets fully experienced the city’s traditional culture and witnessed the achievements of the local economic and social sectors.[Photo by Zhu Xingxin/China Daily]


A three-day media tour of the Beijing Municipal Administrative Center came to an end yesterday in the capital city's Tongzhou district. Organized by the Photojournalist Society of China, participants from over 100 media outlets fully experienced the city’s traditional culture and witnessed the achievements of the local economic and social sectors.[Photo by Zhu Xingxin/China Daily]


A three-day media tour of the Beijing Municipal Administrative Center came to an end yesterday in the capital city's Tongzhou district. Organized by the Photojournalist Society of China, participants from over 100 media outlets fully experienced the city’s traditional culture and witnessed the achievements of the local economic and social sectors.[Photo by Zhu Xingxin/China Daily]

 

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2020-11-30 15:13:50
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Turn Yourself into a Host from Being a Guest]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/30/content_1486869.htm

Fan ke wei zhu, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to reverse the situation by exchanging places. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-30 09:05:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Decorate the Tree with Fake Blossoms]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/30/content_1486868.htm

Shu shang kai hua, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes the act to fake it until one makes it. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-30 09:00:00
<![CDATA[The youthful travails of the follicly challenged]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/28/content_1486863.htm

CHINA DAILY

Losing up to 100 strands of hair a day is a natural phenomenon. However, if that number continues to increase and it appears the hair is not growing back you may be on the road to baldness.

According to the National Health Commission, more than 250 million people in China, or every sixth person, suffers hair loss, many of whom will be under the age of 30.

The Night-time Consultation Report issued on Oct 15 by AliHealth, a wholesale source for medical supplies, said 65 percent of the users who asked for consultation from 9 pm to 7 am were aged between 20 and 30. Those aged 30 and above accounted for 80 percent of those reporting symptoms such as acne, hair loss and depression.

Many of those reporting hair loss attributed their loss of hair to pressure of work and long-term irregular work patterns. In order to prevent hair loss, Wang Xiaohe, who graduated from a top university in Beijing within the past five years, said he had tried food supplements, medicinal supplements, anti-hair loss and hair growth products, but found that "his hairline is getting higher and higher, and the hair is becoming more sparse, almost to the point where the scalp is visible to the naked eye".

"Once the hair becomes thinner and the hairline retracts, the person's whole image is greatly reduced. Anyone who sees me who does not know me thinks I'm older than I really am. For us young people, this is simply unbearable."

So it is not unknown for people under 30 and suffering hair loss to begin wearing wigs. The owner of a wig shop in Beijing says the number of young people visiting the shop has risen from 10 percent a couple years ago to 30 percent now.

"In the beginning most of the customers were middle-aged and elderly," the owner said. "In recent years there have been more young people, especially men, with hair loss their main worry."


CHINA DAILY

The business information provider Tianyancha said that of the 33,000 wig companies in China, 8,400 were set up last year.

Staying up late, drinking alcohol, perming and dyeing are some of the causes of hair loss among young people, says the report. For those under 30 who suffer hair loss, buying ginger shampoo, wearing wigs, and transplanting hair are all options.

One of the big motivating factors among young wig buyers is the desire to project a good image as they seek work. In terms of product selection, wigs are generally more adaptable and comfortable. The prices range from 1,000 yuan to 1,500 yuan for a full wig, while the price for a hair piece is slightly lower, ranging from tens of yuan to hundreds of yuan.

Tmall, part of Taobao, China's number one online sales platform, says wigs were a top seller on Singles Day, Nov 11, last year. As of 8 am that day among the top 10 cities for wig transactions on the platform, Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen were the top four in the number of wig sets sold, Shanghai being the Chinese city apparently most afflicted by baldness. Those in their 30s accounted for 42.4 percent of the buyers, followed by those in their 40s, 25.9 percent, and those in their 50s, 14.3 percent.


One of the big motivating factors among young wig buyers is the desire to project a good image as they seek work. In terms of product selection, wigs are generally more adaptable and comfortable. At present, there are mainly three types of wig materials on the market, namely chemical fiber, the cheapest, real hair and chemical fiber mix more expensive, and human hair, the most expensive.

Most are professionals, Tmall says, dealing with customers, colleagues and subordinates at work, dressed immaculately and with fine hairstyles. However, in the evening they browse wig shops and hair improvement shops on online platforms buying all kinds of wigs or hair nutrient products.

At present, there are mainly three types of wig materials on the market, namely chemical fiber, the cheapest, real hair and chemical fiber mix more expensive, and human hair, the most expensive.

Chemical fiber wigs are the most common among cosersŚQćthose who indulge in cosplay-who wear colorful hair at various animation exhibitions. The tough texture makes it easy to knot after washing and is difficult to manage. You can buy a whole top set for a few dozen dollars.

Wigs made of a mixture of synthetic filaments and real human hair have a more natural look. Most of the wigs costing between 300 yuan and 1,000 yuan sold on Taobao are of this type, with the ratio of real hair to chemical fibers being 4:1.

Real-hair wigs are the most expensive, usually costing thousands of dollars, and more advanced wigs are even customized according to personal hair color and hairstyle needs. These wigs, of course, look the most natural, and as long as they are worn properly it can be difficult to distinguish them from a real head of hair. In addition, they stand out from the other two types of wigs, being more breathable and absorbing moisture.


One of the big motivating factors among young wig buyers is the desire to project a good image as they seek work. In terms of product selection, wigs are generally more adaptable and comfortable. At present, there are mainly three types of wig materials on the market, namely chemical fiber, the cheapest, real hair and chemical fiber mix more expensive, and human hair, the most expensive.

With the most expensive wigs, hair is sewn to a net strand by strand, which not only takes time and effort, but also tests the maker's skills. Most real hair sets or hair pieces start at 3,000 yuan, and the most expensive ones can cost as much as 18,000 yuan.

These wigs are popular among international celebrities, and their natural look and adaptability have helped them became the favorite among Hollywood actresses.

Rebecca, the Chinese wig brand that originated in Xuchang, Henan province, says almost of half of its sales revenues come from Africa and a quarter from the Americas.

The former US first lady Michelle Obama has often been praised in the media for her hairstyle, on many occasions when she wore a wig. When Barack Obama was first elected president, in 2008, wig companies in Xuchang launched the Michelle Same Style wig. As a result, it quickly sold out and was out of stock for several months.

In addition to wigs as a solution to baldness, hair transplantation has become an option for many, and in the current crop of those choosing it, those aged 20 to 30 account for 57.4 percent, a report by China Central Television said.

There are various ways of performing hair transplants, and in 2018, the CCTV report said, about 500,000 such operations were performed in China, the surgery fees exceeding 10 billion yuan. It estimated that the average cost of hair transplant surgery is more than 20,000 yuan.


One of the big motivating factors among young wig buyers is the desire to project a good image as they seek work. In terms of product selection, wigs are generally more adaptable and comfortable. At present, there are mainly three types of wig materials on the market, namely chemical fiber, the cheapest, real hair and chemical fiber mix more expensive, and human hair, the most expensive.

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2020-11-28 10:02:25
<![CDATA[ Hair, there & everywhere ]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/28/content_1486862.htm

Fashion influencer Liu Qiang sells wigs via livestreaming in her hometown, a city that bills itself as the wig capital of China, if not the world, Xuchang, in Henan province, Central China. CHINA DAILY

At 6:30 in the morning Liu Qiang stepped into a room next to a brightly lit broadcasting studio and began putting on makeup. As she did so she continued to familiarize herself with hair productsŚQćmostly wigsŚQćthat she would soon be trying to sell, as well as the scripts she would be reading from to help her do so.

At 8 am sharp, Liu, dressed in hip-hop attire, faced the camera and greeted a worldwide internet audience in well measured and articulated English. Just as importantly, her smooth body movements and the confidence they exuded suggested that this 27-year-old must have had years of sales experience under her belt.

With the deftness of a magician pulling rabbits from under a hat, she changed wigs 15 times in one 60-second spell, leaving many viewers convinced that they could not do without one or two of these hair replacements, in their multitude of styles, colors and sizes.

Two hours later, with the live broadcast done, an exhausted Liu drank a cup of water. When a colleague told her that the broadcast had raked in $3,300, her tired look seemed to evaporate and she smiled broadly.

Most livestreaming events such as these can be beamed from anywhere, with viewers having no idea about exactly where the event is being beamed from. In this case though, the venue was as critical as the content, for it came from a city that bills itself as the wig capital of China, if not the world, Xuchang, in Henan province, Central China.

Last November Liu had been working as a beauty assistant at a hair products counter in a New York department store, and it is unlikely that she would have imagined that a year later she would have been reincarnated as a livestreaming influencer in her homeland.

In turn, the great influencer behind that life change was the COVID-19 pandemic. Liu, born in Xuchang, who used to sell Chinese wig products to Americans in New York, returned home for the Spring Festival in January, and eventually found herself blocked by the pandemic from returning to the United States.

Staying with her parents in Xuchang, she had to decide on her work options and realized that she could turn the challenge to her advantage, given that she was very familiar with the town's most well-known product, she had overseas work experience and she was highly proficient in English.

"When selling at a physical counter, I may deal with 10 customers a day, but on the webcast, two hours of livestreaming allows me to reach nearly a 1,000 customers all over the world," she says. "They may be in the United States, Brazil, Spain, France or elsewhere."

Since she began working for the AliExpress Xuchang hair products cross-border e-commerce live broadcast center in Xuchang several months ago, she has built up a following of 100,000, she says, and each live broadcast can bring in orders worth a total of between $3,000 and $5,000. She does the broadcasts once or twice a week.

Feeding Liu's ambitions to make a big name for herself in the world of livestreaming sales, her broadcast has been chosen to be part of AliExpress' Global Internet Celebrity Incubation Program.

The countries whose men have the greatest prevalence of baldness are, according to the website Quora, the Czech Republic, 42.8 percent, followed by Spain at 42.6 percent, Germany, 41.2 percent, France, 39.2 percent, the United Kingdom 39.2 percent, and the United States, 39.9 percent, and it is predominantly to China, with its wig-making prowess, that they look to as a savior.

Chinese wig-makers and distributors serving the general public grew into what they are today starting from scratch in the 1990s.

However, according to Xuchang county chronicles, local people got into the hair business during the Jiajing reign of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), when human hair was mostly used to make opera props.

At the end of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), it was common for both men and women to have long hair, and German merchants sensing business opportunities often went to the hinterland of China to buy discarded hair, shipping it to Germany and having it processed into various hair products, and then selling them in Europe and in the United States.


Fashion influencer Liu Qiang sells wigs via livestreaming in her hometown, a city that bills itself as the wig capital of China, if not the world, Xuchang, in Henan province, Central China. CHINA DAILY

A Xuchang businessman named Bai Xihe is said to have met one of these German merchants, and the pair opened a joint venture named Dexingyi, equivalent to what today would be a foreign trade company. This small business laid the foundation for Xuchang's wig industry, and 100 years later the town, in the field of hair prosthetics, truly did rule the waves.

The early 20th century happened to be the time when the nationwide braid cutting movement prevailed in the late Qing Dynasty, when braids cut by Chinese men were extremely long, and the Germans used needles to exchange them for huge profits.

In the beginning, Xuchang people simply lopped off hair, but German merchants later provided tools such as wooden combs with which they could refine their activities and taught villagers skills related to processing and preserving hair. After hair was roughly processed, pulled apart, straightened out and tied, it was packed and exported.

In 1933 the local county annals mentioned the standing of the hair trade in the village of Quandian, where it was hugely lucrative.

"I remember that when I was young I would occasionally hear a hawker with a Henan accent yelling 'hair recycling'," says Zhang Jingyi of Beijing, in her early 40s, who had beautiful long hair in her school days that was the envy of her friends.

"When you wanted to sell your hair, you could take out the cut braids. The hawker would look at the length and weigh it. After assessing the hair quality, he would come to a price. Selling hair is similar to selling antiques, and it's a mystery to outsiders how its worth is calculated.

"Later, after living conditions improved, fewer and fewer people gave any thought to selling hair for money. Many young people have never even heard of such thing. In addition, there has been much less space for hawkers since 2000. They're not allowed to enter most communities, there's no way to walk around the streets doing business, and of course you can't collect much hair anyway."

As a result, Xuchang people began to look overseas to collect their raw material of their industry. In Cambodia, Vietnam, Pakistan and Bangladesh, where long hair is cheap, collectors from Xuchang would undoubtedly be active, says Shen Dacheng, a wig factory worker in Xuchang.

Foreign hair is generally 3-5 yuan cheaper per strip than domestic hair, he says.

TianYanCha, a business inquiry platform that is part of the National Small and Medium Enterprises Development Fund, says there are more than 5,000 wig-related companies in Xuchang, many of which export their wares to North America and Africa.

The industry supports more than 300,000 people and supplies half the world's wigs, on average 40,000 being sold every day, it says.

It is reckoned that every two seconds a wig from Xuchang is sold and donned. The cross-border e-commerce transaction volume of Xuchang's hair products was $1.05 billion in 2019, according to the inquiry platform.

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2020-11-28 09:47:27
<![CDATA[Tibetan youth becomes internet sensation]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/30/content_1486875.htm

A 20-year-old youth of the Tibetan ethnic group in SW China's Sichuan province has become an internet sensation for his good looks and innocent smile.

Tamdrin, whose name in Chinese is Ding Zhen, took the internet by storm after a photographer posted a video of him on Douyin, a domestic version of the TikTok short video platform. Many netizens, especially female ones, said Tamdrin had "stars in his eyes" and his smile was "angelic and comforting".

The youngster has been appointed to promote tourism in Sichuan's Litang county. A promotional short clip Ding Zhen's World, which he shot for his hometown of Garze Tibetan autonomous prefecture in Sichuan, was released online on Nov 25, attracting the attention of internet users across China.

Video provided by Bureau of culture, radio, television and tourism of Garze prefecture, Sichuan province, co-produced by Time Island and Bureau of culture, radio, television and tourism of Garze prefecture, Sichuan province.

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2020-11-30 10:15:30
<![CDATA[Exhibition showcases Shaanxi's intangible cultural heritage in Sydney]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/26/content_1486750.htm

Xiao Xiayong, director of the center and the China Tourism Office in Sydney, addresses the opening ceremony of the exhibition, Nov 19, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

An exhibition on intangible cultural heritage from Shaanxi province was launched by the China Cultural Center in Sydney on Nov 19.

About 50 Chinese and Australian officials and representatives attended the opening ceremony.

Xiao Xiayong, director of the center and the China Tourism Office in Sydney, addressed the event. He said the show, themed on oxen, was designed for the coming Chinese New Year, the Year of the Ox, and aims to let local people know more about traditional Chinese handcrafts.

The ceremony features around 100 works from intangible cultural heritage inheritors from Shaanxi province, including mud sculptures, Yaozhou porcelain and embroidery.

The exhibition lasts until Jan 8, 2021.


An exhibition on intangible cultural heritage from Shaanxi province was launched by the China Cultural Center in Sydney on Nov 19, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An exhibition on intangible cultural heritage from Shaanxi province was launched by the China Cultural Center in Sydney on Nov 19, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An exhibition on intangible cultural heritage from Shaanxi province was launched by the China Cultural Center in Sydney on Nov 19, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-11-26 15:21:12
<![CDATA[Candid camera: Palace romance]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/27/content_1486821.htm

[Photo by Song Weixing/China Daily]

A couple have a wedding photo taken in front of the Potala Palace in Lhasa, Tibet autonomous region, on Nov 18. Located on the Red Hill in central Lhasa, Potala is the highest ancient palace in the world, and the largest and most complete palace-style architectural complex in Tibet.

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2020-11-27 08:42:57
<![CDATA[City's ban on smoking in public places still lacks teeth]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/27/content_1486817.htm In the five years since Beijing's anti-smoking law took effect, winning praise from the World Health Organization, the law seems to have gone up in a puff (more like a cloud) of smoke.

Violators in indoor public places, particularly restaurants, have become increasingly brazen and insolent. They are confident, perhaps, that enforcement is not likely.

It's a pity that while dining in the capital city, you can still commonly be nauseated by someone at a nearby table puffing away without a care in the world for your health or theirs.

I have seen many violations, but three instances stand out, with just one of the encounters offering a ray of hope.

The first occurred when a friend and I stopped at a restaurant for a long-delayed chat and some good grub. I was famished.

I should mention at this point that my father was a chain-smoker who habitually puffed at the dinner table, as well as at restaurants, long before smoking in public places was outlawed in the United States. So I know all too well that nothing ruins the appetite or the taste buds' ability quite like wafting, unwelcome cigarette smoke.

Anyway, as my friend and I dined, I detected the strong odor of a cigarette. A man dining with his wife and child at the next booth was indeed smoking, albeit hiding the "cancer stick" under the table to remain undetected, flicking his ashes in a trash can.

Exasperated as I was over a ruined meal, I thought it more proper for the restaurant staff to tell the offender to extinguish his cigarette, so I called it to their attention. After all, a restaurant's failure to comply with the ban could result in a fine of up to 10,000 yuan ($1,520), versus the shrug-inducing 200 yuan an individual violator might face.

My politeness backfired, however. The offender lit up a second time, prompting restaurant staff to scold him anew, and even a third time in defiance, chiding and taunting me.

I had better results on a later evening when I was inside a tiny convenience store and a man waiting in line to scan his purchases was holding a smoldering cigarette.

I addressed him, but he just glanced at me perfunctorily and then looked away dismissively. I protested again and pointed to the no-smoking sign right in front of him. Again, he ignored me.

At that point I put him in the crosshairs of my phone camera, but just as I was about to snap a photo, he hastily opened the shop door and flicked his cigarette onto the sidewalk.

I assumed the man, who wore a restaurant uniform, did not want to risk a fine, since the penalty perhaps carries more weight with a wage earner than, say, a wealthy businessman who might scoff at a mere 200 yuan.

But therein lies the problem. The ban appears to be largely unenforced, and a mere 200 yuan fine is in many cases barely a deterrent anyway.

Beijing might need a multi-pronged solution.

First, enforce the law (or else you might as well rescind it). Smokers puffing away without a worry in restaurants and other public places is testament to the fact they don't expect punishment.

Second, increase the fine for individuals, and perhaps make the cost even higher for repeat offenders.

Third, hold the feet of restaurant and other proprietors to the figurative fire by making sure they aren't allowing customers to smoke. It is the establishments themselves that hold the key to the ban's effectiveness.

Beijing can only claim rights to China's toughest ban if and when the city shows it means business, and that defying the ban has real consequences.

But wait! Another episode I witnessed was encouraging. While I was dining one evening at an elegant hotel's restaurant/lounge in Beijing's Wangfujing shopping area, several businessmen gathered at a nearby table, and some of them promptly lit cigarettes.

A hotel worker passing the table noticed and alerted the manager, who briskly approached and reminded them that smoking was not permitted.

The cigarettes were snuffed, no defiance was displayed, and no resistance shown. You can see the difference a responsible restaurant manager can make.

The key to enforcement might be getting proprietors, who have the most at stake in terms of penalty, to ensure they protect all their customers, rather than acquiescing to an inconsiderate few.

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2020-11-27 08:21:27
<![CDATA[Chinese affiliation with nature inspires the world]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/27/content_1486824.htm

The human-nature bond has rooted profoundly in Chinese culture. In this interview, Eric Messerschmidt, director of Danish Cultural Center, shares his impression on Chinese people's love for natural landscape.

"I have never seen so many people [elsewhere] in the world enjoy nature. You all take a break with nature," he said. "In a world which tries to solve the climate change and solutions for sustainable development, I think the personal relation each of Chinese has with nature is an important cultural feature."

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2020-11-27 09:50:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Remove the Ladder after Your Ascent]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/27/content_1486823.htm

Shang wu chou ti, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes the act to lure someone into a trap by cutting them off from what they need. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-27 09:05:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Play Dumb]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/27/content_1486822.htm

Zhuang long zuo ya, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes the act to play dumb to let one's adversary underestimate one's capabilities. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-27 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Charming Qinghai in NW China]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/26/content_1486811.htm

Northwest China's Qinghai province is famous for its spectacular scenery, multiethnic culture and rich Buddhist heritage throughout the region.

Its most popular tourist destinations include Qinghai Lake, China's largest inland saltwater lake; Chaka Salt Lake, known as the "Mirror of the Sky"; and Kumbum Monastery, a Tibetan Buddhist monastery founded in 1379.

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2020-11-26 17:07:40
<![CDATA[Bird watching fuels tourism boom in Fujian village]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/26/content_1486748.htm

Sliver Pheasants are seen frolicking atop tree branches in Fengtian village in Yongan city, Fujian province, Nov 20, 2020. The village, which has a prime geographic location in terms of natural landscape of mountains and thick forests, boasts a wide range of bird species, which makes the place an ideal destination for bird watching. Twelve bird watching sites have been set up in recent years, facilitating a boom in local tourism. [Photo/Xinhua]


Sliver Pheasants are seen frolicking atop tree branches in Fengtian village in Yongan city, Fujian province, Nov 20, 2020. The village, which has a prime geographic location in terms of natural landscape of mountains and thick forests, boasts a wide range of bird species, which makes the place an ideal destination for bird watching. Twelve bird watching sites have been set up in recent years, facilitating a boom in local tourism. [Photo/Xinhua]


Fengtian village in Yongan city, Fujian province, boasts a prime geographic location in terms of natural landscape, surrounded by mountains and thick forests, a wide range of bird species can be found here, which makes the place an ideal destination for bird watching. 12 bird watching sites have been set up in recent years, facilitating a boom in local tourism.[Photo/Xinhua]


Fengtian village in Yongan city, Fujian province, boasts a prime geographic location in terms of natural landscape, surrounded by mountains and thick forests, a wide range of bird species can be found here, which makes the place an ideal destination for bird watching. 12 bird watching sites have been set up in recent years, facilitating a boom in local tourism.[Photo/Xinhua]


Fengtian village in Yongan city, Fujian province, boasts a prime geographic location in terms of natural landscape, surrounded by mountains and thick forests, a wide range of bird species can be found here, which makes the place an ideal destination for bird watching. 12 bird watching sites have been set up in recent years, facilitating a boom in local tourism.[Photo/Xinhua]


Fengtian village in Yongan city, Fujian province, boasts a prime geographic location in terms of natural landscape, surrounded by mountains and thick forests, a wide range of bird species can be found here, which makes the place an ideal destination for bird watching. 12 bird watching sites have been set up in recent years, facilitating a boom in local tourism.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-11-26 14:34:53
<![CDATA[Passing the baton of Great Wall protection]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/26/content_1486745.htm

Night view of the Shanhai Pass, which is located at the eastern terminal of the Great Wall, in the city of Qinhuangdao, North China's Hebei province, October 11, 2009.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The Great Wall, a symbol of China, has for thousands of years protected residents from invasion. Its defensive role has long ended, but those living nearby are still working hard to safeguard this ancient landmark.

Meandering along mountain ridges across northern China, the Great Wall was built between the 3rd century BC and the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). The existing sections mostly date from the Ming Dynasty, with the Ming Wall measuring over 8,800 km.

Shanhai Pass is located at the eastern terminal of the Great Wall, in the city of Qinhuangdao, in Hebei province. Here, local resident Zhang Peng, 33, can be found climbing the mountainside, a drone in his hands.

Zhang lives in Xiaozhuang village at the foot of the Great Wall. He is one of nearly 100 government-subsidized guardians of the world heritage site in Qinhuangdao.

The guardians, usually farmers, will conduct safety inspections of the key wall sections, stop and report harmful behaviors, and offer advice on the protection work.

Zhang obtained a drone license in 2017. Since then, he started shooting aerial pictures of the Wall, uploading them to a database.

"By comparing pictures of the same place taken at different times, changes can be seen clearly," Zhang said, adding that photos of cracks in the Great Wall have become important reference points for experts restoring the structure.

One time, Zhang found several men using metal detectors to search for "treasure" on the Great Wall, unearthing some ancient firearms. He reported this to law-enforcement officers who rushed to the site, confiscating the relics and punishing the "treasure hunters."

On the Jinshanling section of the Great Wall, watchtowers and walls used to be struck by lightning. On the advice of guardians, authorities have installed lightning rods on certain relics.

The Great Wall is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, consisting of many interconnected walls, traversing several provinces and cities in China.

Due to human destruction and natural weathering, some parts of the Great Wall have collapsed or been damaged, and they are in urgent need of renovation.

Over the years, China has put ever greater effort into protecting the Great Wall, including measures like establishing the Great Wall protection and renovation base and blacklisting visitors who cause damage.

In 2003, Qinhuangdao started employing local farmers to serve as Great Wall guardians, who now cover almost all the important sections.

Zhang Heshan, in his 60s, is one of them. He became a voluntary ranger 42 years ago. Unlike the younger generation of Great Wall rangers who employ modern technology during their work, Zhang has his own "weapons" -- a scythe, a garbage bag and a pair of rubber shoes.

Over the years, he has covered a huge distance during his patrols, amounting to twice the Earth's circumference, and he had worn through over 200 pairs of shoes. The various challenges, such as blizzards, rainstorms, wild bees and snakes, have not held him back.

Human activity once posed the greatest threat to the Great Wall, and it was hard to stop.

"Decades ago, people lacked any awareness of protecting it," he said. "Some villagers stole bricks to build pigpens, herded sheep onto the Wall and dumped rubbish on it."

Since then, he has persuaded the herdsmen to leave, scared away the brick-stealers, stopped tourists from making carvings on the Wall, and picked up the rubbish that was scattered around.

Zhang Heshan is happy to see that public awareness of Great Wall protection has improved. He has collected many historical stories relating to each watchtower and wall section within his area of responsibility.

Now he shoots videos about the Wall and shares the stories on short-video platforms. "In this way, I can make more people become aware of this historic relic and fall in love with it."

"People along the Great Wall have always been the main force protecting this ancient landmark. The protection work is getting better and the Great Wall spirit is also being carried forward," said Hou Kuiran, head of the publicity department of Qinhuangdao's Haigang District.

"The Great Wall is a treasure left by our ancestors. If we don't do something, I think one day it might disappear completely," said Sun Zhenyuan, a Great Wall ranger.

In 2007, Sun got sick and asked his nephew Sun Zhiwei to take his turn on duty. Sun Zhiwei, who runs a rural inn, accepted the invitation without hesitation.

"Great Wall rangers have a modest income, but I don't care about the money. Anyway, someone needs to accept the relay baton of Great Wall protection," he said.

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2020-11-26 10:59:01
<![CDATA[Candid camera: Stars of tomorrow]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/26/content_1486736.htm

[Photo by Xu Jinbai/China Daily]

Young performers wait to audition for a children's Peking Opera competition in Hai'an, Jiangsu province, on Sunday. More than 100 children aged 611 attended the event, which was open to applicants nationwide.

 

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2020-11-26 09:00:15
<![CDATA[Distance from US doesn't stop this determined Florida voter]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/26/content_1486735.htm Every four years, the entire world pays close attention to the presidential elections in the United States, a period that is generally much more eagerly anticipated by US citizens who have the right to vote in such elections. I am one of these citizens, and I was very excited about voting this year.

Before this year, I had only voted from overseas once before, from Malaysia in 2016. At that time, I did it simply because I, like many other US citizens, felt a duty to contribute to the process. The right to vote is very important to us, even for those of us who are living outside of the country - especially when it comes to choosing the president of the US. In fact, if for some reason the US would not have allowed me to vote from here, I would have strongly considered traveling back to the US for the sole purpose of voting, even if it meant quarantining when I returned to China.

Exercising this right is fairly easy inside the US, but a bit more difficult outside of it.

If you're in the US and eligible to vote (to be eligible, the general requirement is that you have to be a citizen and at least 18 years old), you can cast your ballot in person on Election Day (the first Tuesday of November) at your assigned precinct, or you can vote even earlier at some designated local government sites. US citizens are also allowed to mail their ballots in to designated sites.

If you're a US citizen living abroad, mailing your ballot in is the general option offered, but because the US has no uniform election system, the rules to cast your ballot may differ depending on the state and the county you are registered in.

For example, I'm registered to vote in the state of Florida in Palm Beach county. I contacted the supervisor of elections office in my county in July to let them know I wanted to vote. They arranged to have my ballot emailed to me during the first week of October, and then I had the option of either sending it by post or by fax.

I considered mailing in my ballot, especially since the US Embassy in Beijing was planning to hold an event for US citizens to mail their ballots from there. But the embassy event was set to occur before I received the email, so I could not participate that way. Further, I figured that sending it securely by mail involved expenses and risks that I did not want to take. So I decided to fax my ballot instead, deciding that it would be faster and far more convenient.

I found a shop across the street from my home in Beijing that offers faxing service, and a friend who speaks Chinese went with me to ensure there were no translation problems when I was ready to send the ballot.

The voting process is not created equal. Some counties in other states only allow overseas votes to be mailed in, while others are less restrictive and even accept emailed ballots. For me, though, the process was successful. I was able to confirm with Palm Beach county officials that my ballot was received and my vote was counted on Election Day.

Though I enjoy living in Beijing, I am very happy that I had the chance to participate in this year's pivotal US presidential election. No matter what country I live in, I will always exercise my right to vote for the president. In fact, I'm already looking forward to 2024!

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2020-11-26 08:55:28
<![CDATA[EU ambassador: Cross-cultural exchange can be extremely powerful]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/26/content_1486742.htm

Cross-cultural communication can transcend borders and connect people. In this interview, Nicolas Chapuis, ambassador of the European Union to China, talks about the presence of Chinese culture in Europe.

"China has many stories to tell, about the human condition. Experience shows that when you mix culture, it is always extremely powerful," he said. "Today Chinese music, pop music, is selling not only in Asia but also in Europe."

A sinologist, translator, as well as a diplomat, Chapuis graduated in Paris with a MA and DEA in Chinese studies. he has introduced many Chinese literati to France, including Qian Zhongshu, Yang Jiang and Ba Jin. The ambassador is also the first to translate a full poetry collection by Du Fu into French.

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2020-11-26 10:00:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Point at the Mulberry but Curse the Locust]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/26/content_1486738.htm

Zhi sang ma huai, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how insinuation is an eloquent way to reveal the truth. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-26 09:05:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Steal the Beams and Pillars and Replace Them with Rotten Timber]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/26/content_1486737.htm

Tou liang huan zhu, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to sabotage one's adversary by removing his key support. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-26 09:00:00
<![CDATA[EU ambassador: Chinese language taught at European high schools]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/25/content_1486720.htm

"Europe is the first cultural market for Chinese goods," he said. "Maybe the Chinese do not know, but the Chinese language is taught in Europe at high school level. More and more [European students] choose Chinese, much more than Russian or Arabic."

A sinologist, translator, as well as a diplomat, Chapuis graduated in Paris with a MA and DEA in Chinese studies. he has introduced many Chinese literati to France, including Qian Zhongshu, Yang Jiang and Ba Jin. The ambassador is also the first to translate a full poetry collection by Du Fu into French.

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2020-11-25 10:00:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Borrow a Safe Passage to Conquer the Kingdom of Guo]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/25/content_1486719.htm

Jia tu mie guo, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to get one to lower their guard to annihilate both when facing two opponents. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-25 09:05:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Befriend a Distant State While Attacking a Neighboring State]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/25/content_1486717.htm

Yuan jiao jin gong, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes the need to take care of immediate danger first. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-25 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Video star gets job promoting tourism]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/23/content_1486725.htm

Tamdrin

A Tibetan man who recently became famous on Douyin for his good looks and innocent smile has been given a job promoting tourism in Sichuan province's Litang county.

Tamdrin, 20, became famous unexpectedly after a photographer posted a video of him on Douyin, the domestic version of the TikTok short-video platform, in which he wore a traditional Tibetan costume and smiled in front of the camera.

Many netizens, especially female ones, said Tamdrin had "stars in his eyes" and his smile was "angelic and comforting". Many also said that they wanted to be his girlfriend.

The photographer who posted the video also filmed Tamdrin's father and little brother. Neither of them was noticed by netizens.

On Thursday, Tamdrin posted his first video on his own Douyin account in which he introduced his white horse in stumbling Mandarin. The video has been viewed by more than 14 million people and attracted more than 1.8 million followers in one day.

"Tamdrin has been hired by our company to promote the tourism of Litang county and Garze Tibetan autonomous prefecture," said Gao Xiaoping, deputy manager of the county's culture, tourism and sports investment development company.

"He'll get a monthly salary of 3,500 yuan ($530) as well as insurance and subsidies. We'll check the qualifications of the companies that want to cooperate with him to prevent him from being cheated. We'll take no bite of the income or the presents he receives," he said.

Sangyeshung, a Tibetan man who works as a physician for the Ganlu Tibetan Medicine Group in the Tibet autonomous region, said he was glad to see that Tibetans are increasingly becoming internet celebrities.

"They can introduce Tibetan culture, food and places of interests to the world," he said. "The internet provides a very convenient way for the world to learn and appreciate Tibet's charm."

Dorje Tash, a teacher at the No 3 Middle School in Nagchu, Tibet, said most of the Tibetan internet celebrities have simple personalities and unique costumes that catch netizens' attention easily.

"Though Tamdrin is not as handsome as many movie stars, his eyes and smile are really impressive," Dorje Tash said. "The new media platforms provide chances for people like him to show their talent."

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2020-11-23 08:58:54
<![CDATA[Oxford English Dictionary names 'words of the year']]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/24/content_1486709.htm

Use of the word "pandemic" has increased by more than 57,000 percent this year.[Photo/Xinhua]

Oxford English Dictionary (OED) announced Monday for the first time that it has chosen not to name one single word of the year, but many words for the "unprecedented" year 2020.

Describing 2020 as "a year which cannot be neatly accommodated in one single word", OED said Monday that there were too many words to sum up the events of 2020.

Tracking its vast corpus of more than 11 billion words found in web-based news, blogs and other text sources, its lexicographers revealed what the dictionary described as "seismic shifts in language data and precipitous frequency rises in new coinage" over the past 12 months.

Most words of the year are coronavirus-related, including coronavirus, lockdown, circuit-breaker, support bubbles, keyworkers, furlough and face masks.

The report said the word "coronavirus" dates back to the 1960s and was previously "mainly used by scientific and medical specialists". But by April this year it had become "one of the most frequently used nouns in the English language, exceeding even the usage of the word time".

It said use of the word "pandemic" has increased by more than 57,000 percent this year.

The revolution in working habits during the pandemic has also affected language, with both "remote" and "remotely" seeing more than 300 percent growth in use since March. "On mute" and "unmute" have seen 500 percent rises since March, while the portmanteaus "workation" and "staycation" also increased drastically.

Casper Grathwohl, the president of Oxford Dictionaries, said: "I've never witnessed a year in language like the one we've just had. The Oxford team was identifying hundreds of significant new words and usages as the year unfolded, dozens of which would have been a slam dunk for Word of the Year at any other time."

"It's both unprecedented and a little ironic -- in a year that left us speechless, 2020 has been filled with new words unlike any other," Grathwohl added.

The OED's announcement mirrored the huge impact of the COVID-19 on the people from all walks of life. To bring life back to normal, countries such as Britain, China, Germany, Russia and the United States are racing against time to develop coronavirus vaccines.

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2020-11-24 14:48:11
<![CDATA[Autumn visit to Beijing Stone Carving Art Museum]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/24/content_1486703.htm

The Beijing Stone Carving Art Museum, a museum dedicated to locally-discovered historical stone carvings, was built on the site of the Zhenjue Temple, which was itself completed in the late 15th-century.

Among its distinctive collections, we especially recommend the Vajrasana Pagoda and the assemblage of the French Jesuits' gravestones as illustrations of the fascinating stories and history behind this kind of art. Watch the video and plan your visit!

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2020-11-24 14:33:38
<![CDATA[Candid camera: Rain dance]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/24/content_1486676.htm

[Photo by Wang Zeming/China Daily]

With spectators pouring water on participants, a "water dragon" dance is performed in Zhouzi in Peng'an county, Sichuan province, on Wednesday. Wearing a willow-twig crown on their heads, dancers maneuver the "dragon" made of branches. Stretching back more than 1,000 years, the dance was originally held as an offering for a good harvest, but is a spectacular show for tourists today.

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2020-11-24 09:04:30
<![CDATA[EU ambassador: tea culture originates in China]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/24/content_1486678.htm

Tea is a quintessential part of Chinese people's life. In this video, Nicolas Chapuis, ambassador of the European Union to China, talks about the etymology of the word "tea", its very root in Chinese culture, and how it's been adopted into other languages.

A sinologist, translator, as well as a diplomat, Chapuis graduated in Paris with a MA and DEA in Chinese studies. He has introduced many Chinese literati to France, including Qian Zhongshu, Yang Jiang and Ba Jin. The ambassador is also the first to translate a full poetry collection by Du Fu into French.

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2020-11-24 10:00:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Fasten the Door to Catch a Thief]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/24/content_1486675.htm

Guan men zhuo zei, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to isolate the enemy's key person or resource to make everything fall apart. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategiesto find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategiesis a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-24 09:05:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Escape Like a Cicada Casting Off Its Skin]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/24/content_1486674.htm

Jin chan tuo qiao, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to use a cover to assure one's escape. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-24 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Seller to cellar, a glass of wine still has a lot of fizz and sparkle]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/24/content_1486671.htm Wine may be fine, but it has never been my favorite tipple or topic of discussion unlike several of my peers. Over the years I have attended several functions, but by and large stayed away from wines. A lot of it had to do with my limited exposure to the beverage and the hype attached to it, be it the right way of drinking it or the pairings it had with each type of food.

But one thing that I have realized is wine is a multimillion dollar industry globally and nowhere is it growing as strongly as in countries like China and India. My friend K. V.Ashok, a hospitality industry veteran from the southern Indian city of Chennai and an avid wine lover, tells me that the overall wine market in India is roughly about 1 million cases or about $31.6 million a year and growing by about 25 percent annually. There are already Indian companies, which have come out with brands that are gaining consumer acceptance, he said.

Aside of the advantage of drinking it when you can, wine is also seen as an excellent investment. Owning a collection of vintage wine is equivalent to owning a Rolls-Royce, a Picasso or Van Gogh collection, said Ashok. But what really turned my eyes was when he said that China is emerging as a force to reckon with in the global wine market.

Confirmation to that claim came soon in the form of a report from Daxue Consulting, a Beijing-based market research company, which indicates that there has been a sea change in the way wine is being perceived in China. Wine played the role of a social indicator in the olden days and was considered as "expensive and prestigious", says the report. It was more of a masculine drink and consumed largely in the north of the country. But all of that has changed and wine is now available throughout the country and has a new clientele: women and young adults. Throw the emerging middle class into the mix and with a consumption growth rate of 18.5 percent, you have a constantly growing segment which is riding the higher purchasing power wave.

Wine is becoming popular among young Chinese people as they think it is cool, sophisticated, and quite unlike the beverages that their parents used to drink. Wine is finding acceptance with female drinkers as it is not as filling as beer and not as harsh as other spirits, said Tommy Keeling, research director for Asia-Pacific at International Wines and Spirits Record, a market research firm that focuses on the liquor industry, during a recent webinar.

The Chinese drink 1.46 billion liters of wine every year or a little more than one liter per capita, according to a study by Vinexpo, an organizer of international trade fairs. China is ranked fifth in the world, behind the United States, France, Italy and Germany in terms of consumption. The country imported 690 million liters of foreign wines in 2018 and is on track to be the second largest wine consumer by 2021, says the Vinexpo study.

So which segment is fueling this growth, one may tend to ask, especially as fruity, flavored white and sparkling wines are among the preferred choices in China. Red wine is undoubtedly the market leader in China and the best-selling due to cultural traditions and the "health benefits associated with it", said Keeling.

"High-end wine products have not been faring well due to the COVID-19 epidemic as people are keeping away from luxury items due to the diminishing role of social gatherings during lockdowns," he said. In addition, Chinese consumers have started becoming more health conscious and they prefer to drink less and more mindfully. Red wine in particular has long been seen as a "healthier" drink than hard spirits in China, despite the latter being more popular, said Keeling.

According to experts, the Chinese thirst for white wines could increase in the coming years as it steps up its globalization efforts. Viticulture, or the growing of wine grapes, is another sector that has seen considerable growth in China in recent years, especially in the Ningxia Hui autonomous region. Investors such as LVHM(Moet and Chandon) and Domaines Barons Rothschild Lafite have invested heavily in China and are developing their own vineyards in the country, they said.

Despite the market enjoying a positive run in the past few years, this year has been harsh and challenging for the industry. Though there were logistics issues due to the epidemic, online sales channels were able to cover most of the volume losses in the on-trade, said Keeling.

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2020-11-24 08:09:24
<![CDATA[People in New Zealand enjoy Chinese calligraphy]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/23/content_1486661.htm

Trainees work on drawing characters in a Chinese calligraphy and painting class opened by the China Cultural Center in Wellington, New Zealand. On Nov 15, the class saw its 2020 session end. Since 2018, the center has held four calligraphy instruction sessions, which were taught by Huo Jingbo, a professional teacher who graduated from China's Central Academy of Fine Arts. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/ provided to Chinaculture.org]


A trainee works on drawing characters in a Chinese calligraphy and painting class opened by the China Cultural Center in Wellington, New Zealand. On Nov 15, the class saw its 2020 session end. Since 2018, the center has held four calligraphy instruction sessions, which were taught by Huo Jingbo, a professional teacher who graduated from China's Central Academy of Fine Arts. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/ provided to Chinaculture.org]


Since 2018, the center has held four calligraphy instruction sessions, which were taught by Huo Jingbo, a professional teacher who graduated from China's Central Academy of Fine Arts. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/ provided to Chinaculture.org]


Since 2018, the center has held four calligraphy instruction sessions, which were taught by Huo Jingbo, a professional teacher who graduated from China's Central Academy of Fine Arts. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/ provided to Chinaculture.org]


Since 2018, the center has held four calligraphy instruction sessions, which were taught by Huo Jingbo, a professional teacher who graduated from China's Central Academy of Fine Arts. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/ provided to Chinaculture.org]


Since 2018, the center has held four calligraphy instruction sessions, which were taught by Huo Jingbo, a professional teacher who graduated from China's Central Academy of Fine Arts. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/ provided to Chinaculture.org]


Since 2018, the center has held four calligraphy instruction sessions, which were taught by Huo Jingbo, a professional teacher who graduated from China's Central Academy of Fine Arts. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/ provided to Chinaculture.org]


Since 2018, the center has held four calligraphy instruction sessions, which were taught by Huo Jingbo, a professional teacher who graduated from China's Central Academy of Fine Arts. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/ provided to Chinaculture.org]


Since 2018, the center has held four calligraphy instruction sessions, which were taught by Huo Jingbo, a professional teacher who graduated from China's Central Academy of Fine Arts. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/ provided to Chinaculture.org]


Since 2018, the center has held four calligraphy instruction sessions, which were taught by Huo Jingbo, a professional teacher who graduated from China's Central Academy of Fine Arts. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/ provided to Chinaculture.org]


Since 2018, the center has held four calligraphy instruction sessions, which were taught by Huo Jingbo, a professional teacher who graduated from China's Central Academy of Fine Arts. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/ provided to Chinaculture.org]


Since 2018, the center has held four calligraphy instruction sessions, which were taught by Huo Jingbo, a professional teacher who graduated from China's Central Academy of Fine Arts. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/ provided to Chinaculture.org]

 

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2020-11-23 16:09:55
<![CDATA[EU ambassador visits historical site of Red Cliffs]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/23/content_1486657.htm

"East flows the mighty river, the huge waves sweeping away the brilliant figures of thousands of years past," as ancient Chinese literati Su Shi once wrote about the Battle of Red Cliffs (Chibi) ‚Ä?a decisive war in AD 208 that prevented the powerful warlord, Cao Cao, from conquering the Yangtze River's southern bank.

This epic battle still captures the imagination of contemporary intellectuals. In this interview, Nicolas Chapuis, ambassador of the European Union to China, recalls his trip to the historical site in today's city of Wuhan last December.

"Lots of 'beautiful sites' (scenic spots and historical sites) are not the original sites. But they have always been rebuilt. That shows how much the Chinese people are attached to cultural heritage," Chapuis said.

A Sinologist and translator, as well as a diplomat, he graduated in Paris with a doctoral degree in Chinese studies. Chapuis has introduced many Chinese writers to France, including Qian Zhongshu, Yang Jiang and Ba Jin. The ambassador is also the first to translate a full poetry collection by Du Fu into French.

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2020-11-23 15:13:45
<![CDATA[Ode to China: Chilean poet’s works debut in Spanish]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/23/content_1486641.htm

China Roja ( Red China) by contemporary Chilean poet Pablo de Rokha (1894-1968) was recently published in Spanish. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

A collection of poems titled China Roja (Red China) by contemporary Chilean poet Pablo de Rokha (1894-1968) was recently published in Spanish. On Nov 19, an online book launch was held in Chile.

The collection highlights 20 poems which were all created during the poet's six-month visit to China in 1964.

The Chinese version, named Ode to Beijing, was previously published by The Writers' Publishing House in 1965.

It's the first time that the poems have been published in Spanish language in Chile.


China Roja( Red China) by contemporary Chilean poet Pablo de Rokha (1894-1968) was recently published in Spanish. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Chilean poet Pablo de Rokha (1894-1968). [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-11-23 13:43:14
<![CDATA[Fans showcase timeless charm of hanfu]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/23/content_1486643.htm

Lovers of hanfu, the traditional clothing of the Han ethnic group, walk across the Wenshufang cultural block in Chengdu, Sichuan province, Nov 22, 2020. A culture festival featuring hanfu attire was held in Chengdu, aiming to display the charm of traditional Chinese costume culture. [Photo/Xinhua]


Lovers of hanfu, the traditional clothing of the Han ethnic group, walk across the Wenshufang cultural block in Chengdu, Sichuan province, Nov 22, 2020. A culture festival featuring hanfu attire was held in Chengdu, aiming to display the charm of traditional Chinese costume culture. [Photo/Xinhua]


Lovers of hanfu, the traditional clothing of the Han ethnic group, walk across the Wenshufang cultural block in Chengdu, Sichuan province, Nov 22, 2020. A culture festival featuring hanfu attire was held in Chengdu, aiming to display the charm of traditional Chinese costume culture. [Photo/Xinhua]


Lovers of hanfu, the traditional clothing of the Han ethnic group, walk across the Wenshufang cultural block in Chengdu, Sichuan province, Nov 22, 2020. A culture festival featuring hanfu attire was held in Chengdu, aiming to display the charm of traditional Chinese costume culture. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

 

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2020-11-23 13:58:46
<![CDATA[Two for one]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/23/content_1486583.htm

Izzue Market in Island Beverley [Photo provided to China Daily]

With a series of new collaborations, lifestyle and gastronomy make a perfect pair at Izzue Market and Izzue Coffee. 

From a local label to a global presence, Izzue has been a force to reckon with since its launch in 1999. True to its maxim, "Live it Real", the brand has gone on to pursue and promote a tasteful lifestyle that incorporates fashion, art, and food and beverage.

Izzue Market ‚Ä?in the basement of Island Beverley in Causeway Bay and Cityplaza in Taikoo Shing ‚Ä?retails a curated selection of wine and gourmet labels endorsed by Michelin-starred chefs, from foie gras to truffle balsamic vinegar. Just in time for Christmas and Chinese New Year, Izzue Market and Izzue Coffee have launched a series of seasonal collaborations designed to tease the palate.

Izzue market x Nicole‚Äôs Kitchen Sichuan-style devil chilli oil (extra-hot) [Photo provided to China Daily]

Witness the new venture with much-loved Nicole's Kitchen, featuring a collaborative quartet of exclusive products made from premium, healthy ingredients without any colour additives, flavouring agents or preservatives. There's Sichuan-style devil chilli oil (extra-hot), apple peach osmanthus tea, and two artisanal jams: lychee apple rose and pineapple mango strawberry.Osmanthus replenishes the yang and nourishes the yin, making for the perfect drink during the dry and cold season, while the lychee apple rose jam is made with delicate French edible rose petals, producing a wonderfully floral confection.

Two varieties of Izzue Market x Wakka International rice [Photo provided to China Daily]

And while talk doesn't cook the rice, that shouldn't stop a rice being talked about, especially when it's two of Wakka International's brands of premium Japanese rice: Yumepirika (Ś§ĘÁĺéšļ? from Hokkaido and Kounotori (ô¬ĽťÉĒ) from Hyogo. The former, in development for more than a decade, has the appearance of shiny snow and showcases a soft, springy texture with some sweetness and rice aroma. The latter has been cultivated in an organic ecosystem free of pesticides and chemical fertilisers; it's full of shiny grains, and remains sticky with a good amount of umami after cooking.

Ruinart Blanc de Blancs [Photo provided to China Daily]

To complement the cuisine, the libations will have you drinking the stars. Try a Dom P√©rignon duo: the P2 Vintage 2002 and Vintage 2008. They exhibit both restraint and power along with super-fresh, intense aromas of lemons, grapefruit and blood-orange peel. Sup on Mo√ęt & Chandon's Grand Vintage 2012 and savour the bouquet of peaches, toasted nuts, warm bread and honeycomb. Ruinart Blanc de Blancs, from the refined 291-year-old Champagne-based brand, delivers clean, linear minerality with floral accents, spice, and candied ginger, as well as hints of pastry and honey.

Sparkling cold brew coffee [Photo provided to China Daily]

Meanwhile, for the coffeeholics, Izzue Coffee's minimalist pop-up spaces in Cityplaza in Taikoo Shing and Langham Place in Mong Kok have collaborated with New Zealand caffeine specialist Allpress Espresso to offer home-roasted beans with an enticing aroma. There's a trendy array of coffee options to choose from: hipster three-in-one frothy and creamy Korean dalgona whipped coffee, Japanese cold brew coffee (a sparkling option comes blended with iced tonic water), and German hand-drip coffee in nutty and fruity iterations. Light desserts and fresh fruit are served to complement the speciality coffees along with savoury lobster rolls, flaky croissant waffles and more.

A stylish lifestyle combining fashion, art and gastronomic pleasure has never looked or tasted quite so appealing. Embrace it at Izzue Market.

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2020-11-23 10:39:43
<![CDATA[A traditional Tibetan dance makes moves through the ages]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/23/content_1486576.htm

A large crowd of TibetansŚQćmen and women, young and oldŚQćgather to give a Xianzi performance on a large tract of grassland in Markham county in the Tibet autonomous region's Chamdo. [Photo by Sun Fei/Xinhua]

LHASA-Despite being a veteran performer of the traditional Xianzi dance, 58-year-old Tashi Wangdu had never until recently staged a performance in front of a big audience.

Xianzi is a kind of folk art that combines song, dance and string music in the Tibet autonomous region that originated in the Tang Dynasty (618-907).

As the first stop in Tibet along the ancient Tea Horse Road, Markham county in the city of Chamdo boasts rich and colorful folk culture due to its unique geographical features and profound cultural heritage.

It was here where Tashi Wangdu joined some 3,000 other Xianzi dancers-men and women, young and old.


A large crowd of TibetansŚQćmen and women, young and oldŚQćgather to give a Xianzi performance on a large tract of grassland in Markham county in the Tibet autonomous region's Chamdo. [Photo by Sun Fei/Xinhua]

Dressed in traditional Tibetan attire, they performed with sheer delight on the "stage"-a large tract of grassland. They change formations from time to time, sometimes gathering in the center, sometimes spreading out and sometimes holding hands in circles.

"In the Tibetan language, Markham refers to a place of goodness and kindness," says Tashi Wangdu, adding that, since childhood, he and his family would find an open space to light a campfire and dance when celebrating holidays.


A large crowd of TibetansŚQćmen and women, young and oldŚQćgather to give a Xianzi performance on a large tract of grassland in Markham county in the Tibet autonomous region's Chamdo. [Photo by Sun Fei/Xinhua]

Tashi Wangdu learned Xianzi from his father and brother when he was 5 and now teaches his grandson when he has time.

The veteran dancer arrived at the grassland stage a day early to prepare. On performance day, he wore a brand-new Tibetan costume and put his long hair in a ponytail.

Their performance lasted more than half an hour. Beads of sweat dotted Tashi Wangdu's forehead, and he wiped them away with smile lines appearing in the outer corners of his eyes.


A large crowd of TibetansŚQćmen and women, young and oldŚQćgather to give a Xianzi performance on a large tract of grassland in Markham county in the Tibet autonomous region's Chamdo. [Photo by Sun Fei/Xinhua]

"I've been doing Xianzi for decades, but this is the first time I've ever danced with so many people," he says.

"Our traditional culture has made a comeback."

Changdren, deputy director of the county's cultural bureau, says Xianzi is the pearl in the resplendent crown of art in Markham.

"There is a folk belief that Xianzi brings happiness that never ends," says Changdren, noting that it can be performed anywhere and the number of dancers does not matter.


A large crowd of TibetansŚQćmen and women, young and oldŚQćgather to give a Xianzi performance on a large tract of grassland in Markham county in the Tibet autonomous region's Chamdo. [Photo by Sun Fei/Xinhua]

"Sometimes, people in Markham would dance all day, passing the folk art on to younger generations."

The State Council listed Xianzi as a form of national-level intangible cultural heritage in 2006.


A large crowd of TibetansŚQćmen and women, young and oldŚQćgather to give a Xianzi performance on a large tract of grassland in Markham county in the Tibet autonomous region's Chamdo. [Photo by Sun Fei/Xinhua]

To preserve the precious tradition, folk artists in Markham have been teaching and performing it in schools. The dance has also been adapted to gymnastic exercises in 30 primary and secondary schools in the county.

Several competitions have been held over the past few years, Changdren says.

"We're expecting more talented dance producers and performers to improve the creativity and performing skills of Xianzi, thus promoting tourism and our excellent Tibetan culture," he says.

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2020-11-23 08:19:13
<![CDATA[Chen Ailian reinvigorated traditional Chinese dance]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/23/content_1486574.htm

Chen plays Lin Daiyu, the leading role in the dance drama Dream of the Red Chamber, last year in Beijing, when she was 80. JIANG DONG/CHINA DAILY

Legendary performer dies at her home in Beijing at 81

Prominent dancer-choreographer Chen Ailian, whose career spanned seven decades, died from cancer at her home in Beijing on Saturday. She was 81.

Known for her dedication and professionalism, she was among the first group of students in New China to train as traditional Chinese dancers.

As one of the art form's leading figures, Chen was also a devoted dance educator. She served as vice-president of the Chinese Dancers Association and headed the Chen Ailian Arts Troupe, which she founded in 1989, and the Chen Ailian Dance School, which she formed six years later.

One of her daughters, Chen Jie, who is also a dancer, said: "She was not only a mother, but also a great role model to me. She has left a huge dance legacy, and we will always miss her."

Chen Jie said that before she died, her mother donned the costume she wore for the leading role of the Chinese dance drama A Moonlit Night on the Spring River, which premiered in 1962.

Chen Ailian's performance in the production, which is based on Tang Dynasty (618-907) poet Zhang Ruoxu's work of the same title, won her four top prizes that year at the Eighth World Festival of Youth and Students in Helsinki, the Finnish capital.

Born in Shanghai in 1939, Chen Ailian loved to watch movies as a child and dreamed of becoming a film actress. When she was 10, her parents died and she grew up in an orphanage.

One of her early memories of dancing came in 1949 after the founding of the People's Republic of China.

In an interview last year, she said, "There were many art troupes celebrating on the streets and I was drawn to a group of dancers who were performing the moves of the Oroqen ethnic group (from Northeast China).

"One of the dancers bent her body while waving her arms. The way she moved was so beautiful and I imitated her actions. One of my teachers said I had the talent to become a dancer.

"At the time, I knew nothing about dancing. I just felt happy and had fun when I danced."

In 1952, Chen Ailian received training in traditional Chinese dance. The same year, she watched the movie Stars of the Russian Ballet, directed by Gerbert Rappaport, which features scenes from three ballets based on Russian classics.

One of the performances featured in the movie is The Fountain of Bakhchisarai, in which Russian ballerina Galina Ulanova plays the role of Maria, a beautiful Polish princess who is kidnapped and becomes an unwilling love interest for a merciless invader of her homeland who murders her family.

Chen Ailian described this portrayal as "a life-changing experience".

"When Maria met her death, the ballerina played the role by drooping against a wall on both pointes and sliding, turning her feet so that they sank against the floor," she said.

"She danced like a withering flower, transcending any words. From that moment, I wanted to be a great dancer like Ulanova."


Chen teaches students at her dance school, which she set up in Beijing in 1995. CHEN XIAOGEN/FOR CHINA DAILY

Move to Beijing

In 1954, after the founding of the Beijing Dance Academy, China's first dance institute, Chen Ailian moved to Beijing to study. In addition to traditional Chinese dance, she trained in other forms, including ballet.

One of her biggest breaks came when she was 20 and still a student at the academy. She played the leading role in Yu Mei Ren (The Mermaid), a dance drama that premiered in Beijing in 1959.

It was the first Chinese dance drama to combine Western ballet with traditional Chinese dance moves.

After graduating, Chen Ailian became a teacher at the academy and worked with the China National Opera & Dance Drama Theater.

She also played leading roles in many other dance dramas, including The White-Haired Girl and The Peony Pavilion.

Recalling her early studies as a dancer, she said she was influenced by Chinese Opera.

"The academy invited many veteran Chinese Opera artists, which enabled me to master different skills, including those needed for Peking Opera and Kunqu Opera. These art forms influenced me and helped me to dance in my own style," she said.

Feng Shuangbai, president of the Chinese Dancers Association, said: "She didn't want people to see her in a hospital bed. She always wanted to be her best.

"She was a pioneer. When the country started to build up its own dance scene, she made a great contribution by playing many classic roles, gaining attention from international audiences."

Feng said that when a dancer passed the age of 40, this used to mean it was time to quit. However, Chen Ailian showed no signs of slowing down.

"She never stopped dancing. She showed the world that creativity never stops. I used to visit her during Spring Festival every year, when she continued to train for two hours a day," Feng said.

In 1980, Chen Ailian staged a solo dance show in Beijing, the first of its kind in China, in which she showcased her techniques in traditional Chinese dance and ballet.

A year later, she played the role of Lin Daiyu, a teenage heroine in the dance drama Dream of the Red Chamber, based on a novel of the same name written by Cao Xueqin during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911).

Chen Ailian, who was 41 at the time, said: "Some people doubted I could successfully play the role, because of my age. But for me, age is just a number and never a barrier to being a dancer."

In many stage adaptations, Lin Daiyu is depicted as a fragile and tearful character, but Chen Ailian portrayed her as a dynamic, clever and beautiful girl.

Her performance won her widespread acclaim and the part became one of the classic roles of her career.

In 2017, when she was 78, Chen Ailian staged three performances in Beijing with her 42 students to celebrate 65 years in dance, again playing Lin Daiyu.

She said before the first night's performance: "It is exciting for meŚQća new start to an old love. I am proud that we have performed the dance drama more than 700 times since 1981. We have toured the world and we are still doing it."

In her dressing room before she took to the stage in 2017, Chen Ailian did her own makeup and pressed her legs continually to warm up.

"I tell my students that dancing is eternal and you can do anything as long as you have the passion for it," she said.

"Many people have asked me how to stay young and energetic on stage. You can dance as long as you can move. You never get old when your dream lives on."

Her other daughter, Chen Yu, who like Chen Jie is in her 40s, is also a dancer.

During her mother's shows in 2017, Chen Jie worked as her assistant.

"She tried to take care of everything before the show started, such as the lights, the costumes and the music. She cared about the role and the audience," said Chen Jie, who also helped manage her mother's dance school.

"We grew up in theater and watched her performances from a very young age. She inspired us to dance and she was a strict teacher," she added. "She didn't consider dance as an art form only for talented people, but believed it was for everyone."

In 1995, Chen Ailian founded the Chen Ailian Dance School. Chen Jie said thousands of students have graduated from the school and her mother not only served as its president but also taught there.


Chen Ailian plays the leading role in the dance drama Sword in 1981, which was produced by the China National Opera& Dance Drama Theater. PENG ZHANGQING/FOR CHINA DAILY

TV appearance

Last year, Chen Ailian performed as a guest on the reality show Dance Smash, produced by Hunan Satellite TV. Paired with 28-year-old dancer Liu Jia, she impressed the audience, especially the younger members, with her professional technique at age 80.

On Saturday, Liu posted on his Sina Weibo account: "Her performance just took everyone's breath away. She showed me that a dancer can transcend the age barrier.

"I was impressed by her passion for dancing when I worked with her on Dance Smash. She had badly injured her waist, but she still danced hard during the rehearsal."

Liu also posted a photo of himself and Chen Ailian sitting on the floor of the rehearsal room.

Dancer Li Xiang said: "I worked with Chen Ailian a couple of times and she always encouraged me with her positive comments and was keen to share her experience. I could feel her love for young dancers."

Chen Ailian said in an interview in 2017 that Cuban ballerina Alicia Alonso, who died last year at age 98, was her idol.

In 2002, Alonso led her company, Ballet Nacional de Cuba, to perform in Beijing.

Chen Ailian said: "I admire those who pursue their passion despite their age. I still have many ideas about choreographing new dance dramas and for my school. Even if one day I am unable to stand, I can still dance in my mind."

In 2018, to mark her lifetime achievement, Chen Ailian featured in the fashion magazine Marie Claire China, along with seven other senior celebrities, including singer-actress Rebecca Pan, conductor Zheng Xiaoying and actress Lisa Lu.

Each of them, dressed in luxury fashion brands, made rare appearances to share their stories.

Asked in an interview with the magazine what she would tell her younger self, Chen Ailian said: "I've worked hard and I can say that I've realized my career dream. It's nice to be young and it's good to be mature."

In an article published by Guangming Daily on Sept 2, in which she looked ahead to 2022, which would have marked the 70th anniversary of her career, she said, "I look forward to the year 2022 and I want to perform the leading role in the dance drama Princess Wencheng again."

Princess Wencheng was premiered by the China National Opera& Dance Drama Theater in 1979 to mark the 30th anniversary of the People's Republic of China.

It is based on the legendary story of a Tang Dynasty princess who traveled a vast distance to marry Tibetan patriarch Songtsen Gampo to strengthen ties between Tibetans and Han Chinese in the year 640.

Chen Ailian played the leading role of Princess Wencheng, with the production winning national awards after it premiered.

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2020-11-23 07:53:32
<![CDATA[City dreamers]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/21/content_1486555.htm

Tower crane standard section lifting on Suhewan Center (204 meters high, 43 floors), Jing'an district, Shanghai. [Photo by Hu Zhimin/For China Daily]

Documentary photography underlines the ever-changing city of tomorrow.

I am an enterprise manager at the Shanghai Construction Engineering Group, and photography is my biggest hobby, taking up most of my spare time. It has been dozens of years since I bought the Seagull DF-1, the first camera in my life, with the six months of income I saved in 1984.

By chance, I participated in a photography activity on the theme of "Finding the Most Beautiful People". During my exploration, I suddenly realized and discovered around me a group of such beautiful peopleŚQćthe construction builders in the city. As a member of the construction industry, it gives him an inbuilt advantage than outsiders, and I also have the responsibility and obligation to the public by record the worthwhile endeavor of these builders.


The BRICS New Development Bank Headquarters Building (150 meters high, 30 floors) in Shanghai Pudong Free Trade Zone. The tower crane driver controls the boom over the Expo Park site. [Photo by Hu Zhimin/For China Daily]

From then on, I began to focus on photographing urban construction and the builders, especially now that China's development has attracted world attention and admiration. The era of great development has created space and potential for the art of photography, and it has also nurtured the public with lots of wonderful and touching moments.

In recent years, I have been mainly focused on photographing urban high-rise construction, as skyscrapers are the representatives of urban elements. In these buildings the spirit and wisdom of the modern builders are on full display, and all such fresh faces reveal the trajectory of urban development.

This group of photos is a selection of tens of thousands of photos I have taken over a period of more than four years taking advantage of various opportunities. It is also a representative work of my Architect series of documentary photography. In pursuit of the authenticity of the photos, I often get up earlier and return home later than the builders, greet the first ray of light in the city in the morning, and feel the splendor of urban neon in the night.


Outer steel frame installation on Gao Shang Domain (51 storeys, 280 meters high), Tongchuan Road, Putuo district, Shanghai. [Photo by Hu Zhimin/For China Daily]

Of course, concentration alone is not the guarantee of quality photos, but sincerity and perseverance are needed to capture the simplicity and sincerity of these city builders. Among the selected photos, the photographing experience at the construction site of the Qiantan Center Building in Shanghai Pudong Free Trade Zone touched me very much deep.

At the beginning of the filming, the workers often asked me to leave for reasons such as affecting their work. I used my professional knowledge as a national registered supervision engineer with more than 20 years of experience to discuss with them the various issues encountered in construction and installation operations. They also provided reasonable suggestions many times to help solve some small problems on the spot.


Workers coordinate steel components in place on Raffles City. [Photo by Hu Zhimin/For China Daily]

Gradually, their attitude changed. Coupled with the habit of going to the construction site for many years, I always rushed to the construction site to take pictures for everyone during holiday, so that the builders can share it with their families. In this way, everyone began to accept me and I thus became the "director photographer" of the workers. Moreover, as time goes by, they all know my focus, and they would even take the initiative to call me at every key construction period and invite me to take photos.

Another time I was particularly moved was during the filming of Elevated Neon. I kept photographing from noon to evening. I always felt that the light was not in place, and I hadn't caught the scene of the neon flow in the picture. After knowing my thoughts, they took the initiative to work overtime to accompany me to complete the shooting. Looking back on those days, I believe what I harvest most is not the work itself, but the friendship of thousands of builders.


Hu Zhimin takes advantage of the work break to take pictures for the workers.on Gao Shang Domain. [Photo by Hu Zhimin/For China Daily]

Today, Shanghai has become one of the most dazzling cities on the west coast of the Pacific Ocean. Modernization has made the city more attractive than ever, and the city has made people's lives more and more exciting. For me, a person who witnesses and records the changes of the times is fortunate. As long as there is a spirit of perseverance and innovation, all efforts will be full of vitality. With the cloud as my company, I am looking for new landmarks in the city between the sky and the earth; together with the focus, I am seeking new memories of the times in every inch.

The photographer's narrative is translated by Zhang Lei.


Workers have lunch on top of Qiantan Center. [Photo by Hu Zhimin/For China Daily]


Raffles City on the North Bund, Tilan Bridge area, Hongkou district, Shanghai (263 meters high, 50 floors). Structure installation workers hoist steel components. [Photo by Hu Zhimin/For China Daily]


Steel structure hoisting on Qiantan Center (280 meters, 56 floors). [Photo by Hu Zhimin/For China Daily]


[Photo by Hu Zhimin/For China Daily]

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2020-11-21 11:16:09
<![CDATA[Growing overseas readership of Chinese online literature]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/20/content_1486552.htm

Reading on an ebook reader [Photo/Unsplash]

China Literature Corporate released a White Book of 2020 Chinese Online Literature Going Global during the First Shanghai International Online Literature Week.

Part of the following data comes from 2019 Report of China Online Literature Development by China Audio-video and Digital Publishing Association.

By 2019, 10,000 titles of online literature were "made by China, read by the world", with readers coming from more than 40 countries and regions.

3,000 original Chinese titles have been translated into foreign languages, forming a business worth 460 million yuan ($70 million) and enjoyed by a total of 32 million readers overseas.

Most of the readers are people aged 19-30 from North America and Southeast Asia, with slightly more male in North America and more female in Southeast Asia.

Webnovel.com is home to 1,700 titles of such works in English, of which up to 100 gained more than 10 million times of overall visits online, with average of 50,000 new comments appearing on the online forum on daily basis.

700 titles in multiple languages have been published in print or digital format worldwide.

There're 100,000 overseas authors writing Chinese-style online literature, and they have produced 160,000 titles (in multiple languages) already.

A typical author comes from Southeast Asia or North America, is aged under 25, and he/she writes about fantasy, romance and marvel.

Like author known as "The Blips", one of the popular authors. She's from the Philippines, and has turned from a housewife into one writing to support her family. Her work is The Villain's Wife.


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Now hot list:

Release that Witch

Full Marks Hidden Marriage

Super Gene

Once Upon a Time, There Was a Spirit Swormountain

Ancient Godly Monarch

Lord of the Mysteries


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Popular titles:

The Magus Era

The King's Avatar

Library of Heaven's Path

Gourmet of Another World

My Youth Began with Him

Great Doctor Ling Ran


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Published sensation:

The City of Sand, in English

The King's Avatar, in Japanese

Martial Universe, in Korean

Nightfall, in Thai

By foreign authors:

My Vampire System, by British JKSManga

Hellbound With You, by Philippine KazzenlX

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2020-11-20 18:05:28
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Catching Fishes from Troubled Waters]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/23/content_1486582.htm

Hun shui mo yu, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes the act to seize an opportunity in chaotic or unclear situations. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-23 09:05:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Remove the Firewood from Under the Cauldron]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/23/content_1486581.htm

Fu di chou xin, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to eliminate the key strength of the adversary before attacking them. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-23 09:00:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: To Catch Bandits, Nab Their Ringleader First]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/20/content_1486547.htm

Qin zei xian qin wang, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to hide behind the power of another to possess more power. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

]]>
2020-11-20 09:05:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Cast a Brick to Attract a Jade]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/20/content_1486546.htm

Pao zhuan yin yu, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to give away something small to take something big. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

]]>
2020-11-20 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Candid camera: Parental care]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/20/content_1486543.htm

[Photo by Cai Daizheng/China Daily]

A father buttons up his child's raincoat as the mother shields them with an umbrella amid heavy traffic in front of a primary school on Yile Zhongjie Street in Tongzhou district, Beijing, on Wednesday.

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2020-11-20 07:58:53
<![CDATA[Trying to translate terms like <EM>chabuduo</EM>, more or less]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/20/content_1486541.htm Sort of. Kind of. More or less. Roughly speaking.

Basically. Essentially. Approximately.

Almost. Nearly. Good enough.

All these words and phrases can be translated as the meaning of the Chinese phrase, chabuduo-literally, word for word, "difference not much".

However, none of them accurately convey the meanings of chabuduo, an extremely useful phrase that simply doesn't translate well into English much if not most of the time.

It often only kind of means "kind of", sort of means "sort of" and more or less means "more or less". Indeed, the precision with which chabuduo can be translated into English is itself chabuduo.

I constantly sprinkle it into otherwise English-language conversations I have in China, where even foreigners who don't speak much Chinese are likely familiar with the phrase.

That's because, despite the fact English has more words than any other language and possesses a unique propensity to absorb from other tongues, it simply doesn't contain a comparably useful word or phrase with that meaning.

It's one of several such Chinese words that just can't really translate well into English and I'd presume likely many other languages.

That can be said of the fuzziness of many words and phrases translated across many languages. But it seems especially pertinent to chabuduo and English.

It's a similar situation with jiu, which is perhaps most often translated as "exactly". Sometimes, jiu exactly means "exactly". Most often, it doesn't.

It often serves more as an emphasizer. For instance, wo zai san lou would translate as,"I'm on the third floor."

But wo jiu zai san lou would emphasize the location, although it would literally translate as, "I'm exactly on the third floor"-something a native English speaker would never say.

That said, it can translate directly sometimes, such as when answering the question,"Is it this one?" In this case, jiu shi zhe ge would precisely translate as "precisely that one", or, simply, "precisely".

This brings us to a word that can actually work across languages but only maybe about half of the time-rang.

It's typically translated as "to permit", "to allow" or "to let".

It would directly translate as such in the case of,"My boss let me take the day off" (wode laoban rang wo xiuxi yitian).

But it also can mean "compel", "request" or "demand".

That is, as in, "My boss made me work overtime" (wode laoban rang wo jia ban le). No native English speaker would say, "My boss let me work overtime", unless they'd requested extra hours.

However, soon after I first arrived in China 14 years ago, I often noticed Chinese friends saying this exact phrase in English.

After I started learning Chinese, I later came to understand they were literally translating from Chinese in their heads before speaking to me in English.

I do the inverse when speaking Chinese.

A phrase that threw me off during my first few years in China is zuijin, which is typically translated as "recently".

However, it actually refers to the recent past, present and near future.

It initially mostly confused me when Chinese friends would use "recently" in English, since I thought they only meant in the recent past as opposed to also in the next few days or so.

Now, even if they ask in English, I answer as if they'd formulated the question in Chinese, since they likely did so in their mind before interpreting it out loud.

Even if it's not exactly what they meant, it still answers their question-at least chabuduo.

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2020-11-20 07:44:55
<![CDATA[Sculpture exhibition connects China and world]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/19/content_1486538.htm

Walking Men, an exhibition now on at the Guan Shanyue Art Museum, is dedicated to Wu Weishan's efforts to hail historical figures. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Luminaries such as scientists, artists, writers and thinkers tell the hardships and glories of a nation and, all together, they shape the history. For this reason, sculptor Wu Weishan has centered his work around depicting prominent figures in Chinese history, especially the intellectuals, for several decades.

Walking Men, an exhibition now on at the Guan Shanyue Art Museum in Shenzhen, is dedicated to Wu's long-standing efforts. It shows 101 sculptures and 35 paintings by Wu to navigate through those people of cultural importance not only to China but also to the world.

The exhibition through Nov 26 is part of the celebrations of 40th anniversary of Shenzhen Special Economic Zone this year.


Walking Men, an exhibition now on at the Guan Shanyue Art Museum, is dedicated to Wu Weishan's efforts to hail historical figures. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Walking Men, an exhibition now on at the Guan Shanyue Art Museum, is dedicated to Wu Weishan's efforts to hail historical figures. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Walking Men, an exhibition now on at the Guan Shanyue Art Museum, is dedicated to Wu Weishan's efforts to hail historical figures. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Walking Men, an exhibition now on at the Guan Shanyue Art Museum, is dedicated to Wu Weishan's efforts to hail historical figures. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Walking Men, an exhibition now on at the Guan Shanyue Art Museum, is dedicated to Wu Weishan's efforts to hail historical figures. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Walking Men, an exhibition now on at the Guan Shanyue Art Museum, is dedicated to Wu Weishan's efforts to hail historical figures. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-11-19 14:12:25
<![CDATA[Illustration show at Tsinghua hails masters of imagination]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/19/content_1486537.htm

A work by André Francois as the cover of the magazine Haute société. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

Illustrations for different reading materials, such as books and magazines, help readers of many ages better understand the content. Meanwhile they also stand alone as quality works of art for fine techniques and colors.

Image of the West, an illustration exhibition at Tsinghua University Art Museum, gathers such works by acclaimed artists in Europe and the United States.

It is a celebration of imagination. The paintings on show reinterpret fairy tales and literary works, many of which are also quite familiar to Chinese audiences. Some were for original stories created by the illustrators themselves.

The bulk of works on show until Feb 28 are from the collection of Fondation Les Maitres de l'Imaginaire, an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, with an aim to collect works by renowned children's books illustrators around the world. The rest are works by Etienne Delessert, the foundation's founder and a graphic artist in his own right.


A work by Etienne Delessert, from the book Dance! by Etienne Delessert. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A work by Frédéric Clément, from the book Monsieur Ravel by Frédéric Clément. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A work by Ivan Chermayeff, from the book The Three Languages by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A work by Jean Claverie, from the book Little Lou in Paris by Jean Claverie. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A work by Marshall Arisman, from the book Fitcher's Bird by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A work by Monique Felix, from the book Hansel and Gretel by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Image of the West, an illustration exhibition at Tsinghua University Art Museum, gathers works by acclaimed artists in Europe and the United States. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Image of the West, an illustration exhibition at Tsinghua University Art Museum, gathers works by acclaimed artists in Europe and the United States. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Image of the West, an illustration exhibition at Tsinghua University Art Museum, gathers works by acclaimed artists in Europe and the United States. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Image of the West, an illustration exhibition at Tsinghua University Art Museum, gathers works by acclaimed artists in Europe and the United States. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

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2020-11-19 14:07:58
<![CDATA[Landscapes on show remember a late reformer]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/19/content_1486536.htm

Autumn by Sun Bowen [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

The works of late landscape painter Sun Bowen show two major directions of reimagining the face of classic shanshui mountain-and-water paintings in the 20th-century China, employing bold, carefree brushes to present the grandeur of nature and highly-saturated colors to bring the genre of ink paintings more accessible to the general public.

Impassioned Poem, an exhibition at the National Art Museum of China until Sunday, marks the lifelong effort of Sun, a low-profile reformer of art. It also shows his literary accumulations in composing poems, practicing calligraphy and carving seals, through which one can feel his scholarly spirit.


Landscape by Sun Bowen [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


River by Sun Bowen [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Spring by Sun Bowen [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Village by Sun Bowen [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

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2020-11-19 14:01:48
<![CDATA[Exhibition marks master and his friends]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/19/content_1486535.htm

In 1933, ink artist Qi Baishi carved out four characters on a seal, "zhi ji you en", which means remembering the kindness from best friends. [Photo provided to China Daily]

In 1933, ink artist Qi Baishi achieved a major breakthrough in art and began to gain fame in the cultural circles of Beijing. Also a noted seal-making artist, he carved out four characters on a seal, "zhiji you'en", which means "remembering the kindness from best friends".

This anecdote inspired curators of the Art Museum of Beijing Fine Art Academy, an institution famous for a rich collection of Qi's works, to mount an exhibition marking Qi and those in his close personal circle, Kindness from Bosom Friends.

The ongoing exhibition through Jan 31 shows artworks which are a testament to the support Qi received from six people, who helped the master artist progress and innovate, or introduced his art to wider audiences.


A Portrait of Hu Qinyuan, by Qi Baishi and in the collection of Liaoning Provincial Museum, on show. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Remembrance, by Qi Baishi and in the collection of Beijing Fine Art Academy on show. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Studio, by Qi Baishi and in the collection of Xu Beihong Memorial Museum, on show. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

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2020-11-19 13:57:07
<![CDATA[Donated works of 93-year-old artist capture rural life]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/19/content_1486534.htm

Ages, by Gao Chao and in the collection of National Art Museum of China. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

Gao Cheng, 93, is dedicated to depicting the livelihood of the ordinary people, especially those living in rural areas, by documenting the transformation of a country in the second half of the 20th century.

Gao recently donated around 30 oil paintings, drawings and sketches representing the evolution in his work since the 1950s to the National Art Museum of China in Beijing.

These works are now part of his solo exhibition, Frankly Sincere, at the museum through Sunday, reflecting Gao's deep concerns with his people and nation.

Gao's paintings of countryside landscape and scenes deliver vibrancy and sincerity, reminding one the works of Bruegel Pieter, the 16th-century Dutch painter known for portraying peasant life.


Crossroads, by Gao Chao and in the collection of National Art Museum of China. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Date Trees, by Gao Chao and in the collection of National Art Museum of China. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Gossip, by Gao Chao and in the collection of National Art Museum of China. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Harvest, by Gao Chao and in the collection of National Art Museum of China. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Home, by Gao Chao and in the collection of National Art Museum of China. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Ironworks, by Gao Chao and in the collection of National Art Museum of China. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Moon, by Gao Chao and in the collection of National Art Museum of China. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Wangfujing, by Gao Chao and in the collection of National Art Museum of China. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Wheat Field, by Gao Chao and in the collection of National Art Museum of China. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

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2020-11-19 13:53:02
<![CDATA[Snow descends on Gubei Water Town in Beijing]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/20/content_1486559.htm

The Gubei Water Town in Miyun district in Beijing sees the first snow of the winter this year on the morning of Nov 19. [Photo by Chen Yongli/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


The Gubei Water Town in Miyun district in Beijing sees the first snow of the winter this year on the morning of Nov 19. [Photo by Chen Yongli/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


The Gubei Water Town in Miyun district in Beijing sees the first snow of the winter this year on the morning of Nov 19. [Photo by Chen Yongli/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


The Gubei Water Town in Miyun district in Beijing sees the first snow of the winter this year on the morning of Nov 19. [Photo by Chen Yongli/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


The Gubei Water Town in Miyun district in Beijing sees the first snow of the winter this year on the morning of Nov 19. [Photo by Chen Yongli/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


The Gubei Water Town in Miyun district in Beijing sees the first snow of the winter this year on the morning of Nov 19. [Photo by Li Kaili/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


The Gubei Water Town in Miyun district in Beijing sees the first snow of the winter this year on the morning of Nov 19. [Photo by Zhou Dinghao/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


The Gubei Water Town in Miyun district in Beijing sees the first snow of the winter this year on the morning of Nov 19. [Photo by Zhou Dinghao/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


The Gubei Water Town in Miyun district in Beijing sees the first snow of the winter this year on the morning of Nov 19. [Photo by Zhou Dinghao/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

 

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2020-11-20 15:12:38
<![CDATA[Chile prepares to welcome international tourists]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/18/content_1486470.htm As one of the countries that was severely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, the Chilean government decided to open its borders again to welcome foreign tourists on Nov 23.

To ensure safety, tourists arriving at Chile must provide negative COVID-19 nucleic-acid test results taken within 72 hours, signed travel commitments and health insurance. Meanwhile, travelers are required to keep in touch with the Chile Health Department and report travel routes and health conditions.

The country, the best place to watch the total solar eclipse on Dec 14, is striving to welcome tourists from abroad.

Chile will receive about an estimated 300,000 international tourists at the end of 2020 on the condition that epidemic prevention measures go smoothly.

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2020-11-18 15:38:13
<![CDATA[NCPA sets tone of optimism in upcoming musical calendar]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/19/content_1486488.htm

Music director Lyu Jia (right) works with the orchestra to play Egmont. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

On Nov 12, the China NCPA Orchestra announced its 2020-21 season at the National Center for the Performing Arts in Beijing, which features programs presenting music by Ludwig van Beethoven, Gustav Mahler, among others, as well as the world premiere of works by Chinese composers.

The season kicked off with two concerts held at the NCPA on Nov 12 and Nov 14, featuring the orchestra performing Beethoven's epic piece, Incidental Music to Goethe's Egmont, Op 84 under the baton of conductor Lyu Jia.

Beethoven started to write the piece in the autumn of 1809 and, in 1810, it premiered with a sequence of 10 incidental pieces composed for full symphony orchestra, soprano soloists and a male narrator. During the version performed by the orchestra, the musicians were joined by Sun Qiang, an actor of the National Theater of China and soprano Song Yuanming.

"The 2020-21 season marks the 10th season for the China NCPA Orchestra. The original plan was to have an 18-month-long session from this March," says the orchestra's director Ren Xiaolong, adding that they planned to have world-renowned conductors, including Daniel Gatti, Marin Alsop, Chung Myung-whun and Zhang Xian, collaborate with the orchestra during the season. "We have to make changes to the programs due to COVID-19."


The China NCPA Orchestra holds a ceremony to mark its 10th anniversary after an open rehearsal at the National Center for the Performing Arts in Beijing on Nov 12. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

The 2020-2021 season that will be delivered by the orchestra is quite different, as Ren says, "it pays tribute to the continuously innovative human spirit".

Paraphrasing a line from the Confucian classic The Book of Rites, which translates roughly as, "If you can improve yourself in a day, do so each day, forever building on that improvement and you will evolve", the orchestra has adopted it as the 2020-21 season's theme: ri xin in Chinese, "evolution" in English.

"For all the musicians of the orchestra, who didn't perform together onstage for months, the season means a new beginning. For the audiences, who were not able to enjoy live concerts at the NCPA, it's also a reunion with classical music," says Ren, adding that the orchestra has performed 38 online concerts since April, which received warm feedback from audiences.

Marking the 250th anniversary of Beethoven's birth, the orchestra will present the Beethoven 250 series, performing the German composer's nine symphonies and his 11 overtures under the baton of music director Lyu Jia.

On Feb 25 and Feb 26, the NCPA Quartet, featuring violinists Li Zhe, Liu Xian, violist Zhuang Ran and cellist Liang Xiao, will perform Beethoven's string quartets, String Quartet No 4 in C minor Op 18 and String Quartet No 6 in B flat major Op 18. They will also premiere a new piece that pays tribute to the great composer, About Beethoven, written by Chinese-Australian composer Julian Yu.


Musicians with the orchestra rehearse Beethoven's work. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

Yu, 63, who was born in Beijing and graduated from the Central Conservatory of Music in 1977, moved to Australia in 1985 and teaches at the University of Melbourne. Commissioned by the orchestra, the composer's piece, Evolution, will premiere on Dec 20. Echoing the theme of the orchestra's 2020-21 season, the piece also celebrates the 13th anniversary of the NCPA.

The year 2020 also marks the 160th anniversary of Mahler's birth. In the Mahlermania series, conductor Lyu leads the orchestra in performances of Mahler's The Song of the Earth, Song of a Wayfarer, and the unfinished Symphony No 10.

On March 12, the orchestra will premiere Chinese-American composer Bright Sheng's new piece, titled Roosters of Dawn, co-commissioned by the orchestra, Carnegie Hall and the National Arts Center of Canada. The piece embodies a cultural integration of the East and the West.

Veteran Chinese composer Zhao Jiping will be featured as the 2020-21 season's composer-in-focus, with the orchestra, performing his works, including Pipa Concerto No 2 and Violin Concerto No 1.

"I've worked with the China NCPA Orchestra many times and they've premiered some of my compositions. Those young musicians fill me with the passion and desire for creation," says Zhao, 75, who is known for his film scores for Chinese director Zhang Yimou's Raise the Red Lantern (1991) and To Live (1993), as well as director Chen Kaige's Farewell My Concubine (1993). He has been commissioned by the orchestra to write a new symphonic choral work, titled The Story of Flowers.


Wang Ning (right), director of the NCPA, speaks at the anniversary ceremony. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

As the NCPA's resident orchestra, it has grown to be a mainstay of its home theater since its founding in 2010.

In 2014, the orchestra undertook its first North American tour and returned there in 2017, when it performed at Carnegie Hall, Chicago Symphony Center, Davies Symphony Hall and other major venues in the US and Canada, under the baton of Lyu.

"When we perform together as a symphony orchestra onstage, we speak with our musical language, which speaks to the imagination of the audience. That's the most beautiful part about enjoying a classical music concert," says Lyu. "We feel proud of what we've achieved. As a symphony orchestra, we are still very young."

Violinist Li Zhe joined in the orchestra a year after it was founded.

"Like many of my colleagues, we started to play with the orchestra in our early 20s and now we are in our 30s. We've married and had children since. Being a member of the orchestra for 10 years is a great part of our lives," says Li.

After starting to learn the instrument at 5 years old, Li studied with the late music educator Lin Yaoji at the primary school affiliated to the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing. Later, after graduating from the Central Conservatory of Music, Li studied at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in Britain.

"One of my teachers told me that the major function of music is to comfort people. I totally agree with that. Especially when we are going through the pandemic, we need music," says Li.

Soprano Song Yuanming (right) at the rehearsal. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

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2020-11-19 08:08:46
<![CDATA[Candid camera: High ambition]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/19/content_1486496.htm

Workers, who both have a head for heights, hang a giant poster advertising a photo exhibition highlighting rural life at the Xie Zilong Photography Museum in Changsha, Hunan province, on Nov 12. [Photo by Tian Weitao/China Daily]

 

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2020-11-19 09:50:18
<![CDATA[Visiting China Online: Ningxia]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/19/content_1486495.htm

[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

As a treasure in the western part of China, Ningxia is a popular tourist destination that has scenic spots such as Liupan Mountain, the Western Xia Imperial Tombs and Shapotou, among others.


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-11-19 09:32:43
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Cast a Brick to Attract a Jade]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/19/content_1486498.htm

Pao zhuan yin yu, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to give away something small to take something big. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-19 10:10:14
<![CDATA[EU ambassador: Confucius exemplifies how travel educates the mind]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/19/content_1486497.htm

In this episode, Nicolas Chapuis, ambassador of the European Union to China, discusses the connection between education and travel, a notion shared in both European and Chinese cultures.

"Confucius left his hometown, the country of Lu, and traveled from state to state to propagate his ideas," he said. "There is no personal growth without traveling. And in a globalized world, it is even more important."

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2020-11-19 10:00:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Let the Adversary Off in Order to Snare Him]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/19/content_1486494.htm

Yu qin gu zong, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to give away something so the enemy lowers his guard in order to catch him. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-19 09:05:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Lure the Tiger Out of the Mountain]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/19/content_1486493.htm

Diao hu li shan, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to lure one's adversaries away from their home base or resources. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-19 09:00:00
<![CDATA[True wealth accumulated over a lifetime isn't tangible]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/19/content_1486490.htm We all change with time. Those clothes we wore as teenagers may not fit anymore, or may seem wildly inappropriate.

In the 1970s, I actually bought a pair of platform shoes, which for some unknown reason were fashionable at the time for young men. I didn't wear them much, and I don't even remember getting rid of them. (Man, I hope I still don't have them stored in a box somewhere!)

Other things I have from the past I have kept and still prize. I still love the pair of sweaters I got in South America some 30 years ago.

While people certainly are not articles of clothing or shoes, friends can in some way reflect these same points. I am in touch with relatively few friends from my youth. Sometimes that seems sad, but then I realize that I was actually a different person, as were they. That has happened even with some of my best friends from years ago.

I have deep bonds with a few friends that have stood the test of time. We both may have changed, but our values are still similar. In many cases, I'm better friends with them than I was years ago. I consider them friends for life. They are like family-and, to tell the truth, I'm closer to them than I am with much of my family.

We run into people over our lifetimes with whom we are close for a while. Then time and distance wear at the bonds and sometimes dissolve them. That is a little sad, but I try to appreciate the friendship we had. After all, not even life is permanent.

Social media, for all its ills, and other forms of communication via computer do help us stay in touch with friends and acquaintances. It is especially helpful for those of us who have moved a lot, even to the point of changing the continent where we live. After moving to China over eight years ago, I discovered a wonderful new world and made new friends, but I haven't totally lost touch with people in other places.

Still, it takes effort to maintain a friendship-the proverbial twoway street. That means more than an annual birthday greeting. Not all the friends you've made may be willing to participate. But for those who are, it's a chance to build on the friendship you formed-adding layers, exchanging new experiences and, if you're lucky, getting to see them in person again. (Though, in most of the world, this last thing may have to wait on more success against COVID-19.)

Here's a few of the tips on maintaining your relationships found online at getthefriendsyouwant.com.

1. Keep taking an interest in what they do. Share your own interests. If they pick up a new interest or hobby, get excited and be happy for them.

2. Stay in touch. This is 80 percent of the game in maintaining friendships.

3. Reciprocate a friend's interest. If they reach out or share information with you, do the same.

4. Manage conflicts; it's the best of friendships that are likely to hit a bump in the road. If you don't, you might lose a dear friend.

5. Remember that your friends will change, as will you. The most interesting of your friends are those who seek out new things.

Other bits of advice: Be more open, go easy on criticisms and keep secrets.

Good friends are like gold. Over time, I've learned that it's worth the effort to keep them.

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2020-11-19 08:42:55
<![CDATA[Chinese relics return home from UK]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/19/content_1486484.htm

68 Chinese cultural relics lost to the United Kingdom have recently returned to China thanks to the joint efforts of the two countries, according to China’s National Cultural Heritage Administration on Wednesday. (Video by Yilin Yang)

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2020-11-19 05:01:50
<![CDATA[Film week honors online movies, youth power]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/18/content_1486478.htm

The second China Online Movie Week was held in the southwestern Chinese city of Chengdu, Nov 11 to 13, 2020. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The second China Online Movie Week, recently concluded in Chengdu, capital of Southwest China's Sichuan province, crowned seven movies as the most influential online movies of the year, including fantasy adventure Double directed by Ding Ziyang, fantasy movie The Enchanting Phantom and adventure movie Snake 2, both directed by Lin Zhenzhao.

The three-day event, held from Nov 11 to 13 in Anren ancient town on the outskirts of Chengdu, capital of Southwest China's Sichuan province, also featured a forum centered around new opportunities for online movies, integration of big-screen movies and online ones, as well as a search for young talent to inject new vitality into the development of China's online film industry.

Statistics show the number of internet audio-and-video users in China reached 901 million as of June, covering 95.8 percent of all internet users in the country.

"It's a very large market," said Yang Xianghua, president of membership and overseas business group of iQiyi. "The reality film Spring Tide, which was first broadcast on iQiyi (instead of cinemas), won the nominations of Best Picture and Best Director in this year's Golden Rooster Awards. It means good movies are not limited to distribution models - whether on big or small screens. This gives us full confidence in the future."


Poster of Spring Tide. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The idea of "online movies", widely referring to those screened on the internet instead of cinemas, first emerged in China in 2014, with works broadcasting on China's Netflix-like services iQiyi, Tencent Video and Alibaba's Youku.

For a long time, Chinese online movies were mostly cheaply made comedies, eye-catching monk zombie movies and fantasy dramas, until more realistic themes emerged in 2018.

Talking about the rise of youth power in China's online movie industry, Wang Rui, head of the Directing School of Beijing Film Academy - a leading Chinese film school, said, "After graduating from a film school, it often takes a long time for our studens to find opportunities to make cinema-line movies. There are relatively fewer opportunities for young directors. Online movies come as good opportunities for them to start with."

But he added many of his students were hesitant to join the industry because of low investments. "I was told before that the investment for an online movie was only some 2 million yuan ($305,000). If the investment could rise, I believe it will draw a lot of talented young directors to join in."

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2020-11-18 16:01:00
<![CDATA[EU ambassador: Young Europeans want to learn everything about China]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/18/content_1486469.htm

"What the young Europeans want to learn about [China] is about everything," Nicolas Chapuis, ambassador of the European Union to China, said. "Why is China a great civilization? I think China needs to do more, in cross-cultural dialogues, to show the unity of its civilization."

A Sinologist and translator, as well as a diplomat, he graduated in Paris with a doctoral degree in Chinese studies. Chapuis has introduced many Chinese writers to France, including Qian Zhongshu, Yang Jiang and Ba Jin. The ambassador is also the first to translate a full poetry collection by Du Fu into French.

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2020-11-18 15:15:26
<![CDATA[Preview exhibition held ahead of Christie's Autumn Auctions in Hong Kong]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/18/content_1486460.htm

Visitors look at modern and contemporary artworks displayed on a preview exhibition ahead of Christie's Autumn Auctions Hong Kong in Hong Kong, South China, Nov 16, 2020. The 2020 Christie's Autumn Auctions Hong Kong will be held between Nov 27 and Dec 5.[Photo/Xinhua]


Visitors look at modern and contemporary artworks displayed on a preview exhibition ahead of Christie's Autumn Auctions Hong Kong in Hong Kong, South China, Nov 16, 2020. The 2020 Christie's Autumn Auctions Hong Kong will be held between Nov 27 and Dec 5.[Photo/Xinhua]


Visitors look at modern and contemporary artworks displayed on a preview exhibition ahead of Christie's Autumn Auctions Hong Kong in Hong Kong, South China, Nov 16, 2020. The 2020 Christie's Autumn Auctions Hong Kong will be held between Nov 27 and Dec 5.[Photo/Xinhua]


Visitors look at modern and contemporary artworks displayed on a preview exhibition ahead of Christie's Autumn Auctions Hong Kong in Hong Kong, South China, Nov 16, 2020. The 2020 Christie's Autumn Auctions Hong Kong will be held between Nov 27 and Dec 5.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-11-18 11:04:10
<![CDATA[Major travel expo kicks off in Shanghai]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/18/content_1486432.htm

Spanish tourism authority sets up a booth at the ongoing China International Travel Mart to showcase their cultural and tourism specialities in Shanghai. [Photo by Gao Erqiang/China Daily]

A total of 1,500 exhibitors from 50 countries and regions are participating in the China International Travel Mart (CITM) 2020, which is taking place in Shanghai from Monday to Wednesday.

Held in the Shanghai New International Expo Center, the event consists of three areas -- one for Chinese regions, provinces and cities to showcase their cultural and tourism specialities, one for Chinese cultural and tourism companies, and one for international exhibitors to connect with customers.

As one of the hosts, the Chinese Ministry of Culture and Tourism has set up several booths to celebrate China's cultural and tourism collaboration with global partners, including the "Culture City of East Asia" by its bureau for international exchanges and cooperation, and the "Key Projects of Belt and Road Cultural and Tourism Cooperation" booth by its cultural and tourism industries department.

Cultural institutions such as the Palace Museum, the National Museum of China, the National Library of China, and the National Art Museum of China have also set up booths to showcase a wide range of creative products.

Due to the travel restrictions because of COVID-19, the expo has held online business talks for those who are unable to attend the event.

A promotional event by the China Tourism Promotion Alliance, the first Health Tourism Development Forum, the China-Afro-Asia Tourism and Aviation Forum, and the Seminar on Cultural and Tourism Integration in the Yangtze River Delta were also held on the sidelines of the expo.

Founded in 1998, CITM has grown into one of the major travel expos in the Asia-Pacific region. This year's event aims to inject vitality into the post-pandemic inbound tourism market in China and promote international cultural and tourism exchange and cooperation.

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2020-11-18 10:30:48
<![CDATA[Michelin Guide for Beijing unveiled]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/18/content_1486431.htm

A view of Cai Yi Xuan [Photo provided to China Daily]

The second edition of the Michelin Guide Beijing was issued in the capital on Monday with several new star entries and the launch of the Michelin Green Star selection.

The 2021 edition of the guide features 98 restaurants including two three-star restaurants, two two-star restaurants and 26 one-star restaurants. Also noted are 17 restaurants dubbed Bib Gourmands and 51 with Michelin Plate designations.

Vegetarian restaurant King's Joy, located in Wudaoying Hutong, was promoted to three-star status after earning two stars last year. Xin Rong Ji, on Xinyuan South Road, received three stars for the second year in a row.

On the two-star list, there is one new name - Jingji, which features imperial cuisine and regional cooking. Meanwhile, Shanghai Cuisine has retained its two-star designation from last year.

Seven new restaurants made their debut in the one-star category. Three of these were added to the guide for the first time, while four others were promoted from Michelin Plate.

Gwendal Poullennec, international director of Michelin Guides, said through a video message that despite the hard times in 2020, "Beijing restaurateurs have demonstrated an incredible commitment in overcoming the crisis and recovering their activity with an unchanged passion and talent.

"Indeed, Beijing, as the historic capital city and a cultural center of China, sets the table for culinary habits, recipes and know-how from both all over China and the world. All these shape a culinary scene whose diversity, dynamism and richness have really impressed our inspectors," he commented.

Besides the star entries, three new restaurants - Niujie Halal Man Heng Ji, Pang Mei Noodles and Tong He Ju (Yuetan South Street) - were added to the Bib Gourmand's list, which highlights restaurants offering quality food for a fair price.

The Michelin Guide also launched its Michelin Green Star designation.

According to Kamran Vossoughi, president and CEO of Michelin China, the green star aims to highlight role model establishments at the forefront of sustainable gastronomy with their virtuous initiatives.

King's Joy was this year's Green Star recipient.

"Here, in Beijing, restaurants and chefs never cease to improve and to show their growing commitment to sustainable gastronomy as evidenced by the introduction of the Michelin Green Star for the first time in China," Poullennec said.

Beijing-based food critic Dong Keping said he thinks environmental protection, organic food and sustainable development have become the trend in the catering industry over the past few years, and as a vegetarian restaurant, King's Joy's Green Star award is reasonable.

He said that he hopes restaurants can reduce kitchen waste to help better protect the environment.

Besides the Green Star, the guide added two other new awards - the Young Chef Award, which went to Julien Cadiou, the French chef of Jing, which just received its first star, and the Service Award, which was granted to Liu Shiling, who works at three-starred Xin Rong Ji (Xinyuan South Road).

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2020-11-18 10:18:28
<![CDATA[Ningxia: An oasis in the hinterland]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/18/content_1486429.htm

The Ningxia Hui autonomous region in Northwest China is one of the birthplaces of Chinese civilization and an important link on the ancient Silk Road.

Boasting diverse topography and physiognomy, it gained the reputation of "the miniature garden of Chinese tourism". It is also an ideal place for observing stars due to its clear skies, dry climate and good environment.

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2020-11-18 09:49:39
<![CDATA[An aerial view of Sand Lake scenic spot]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/18/content_1486430.htm

Take an aerial view of the Sand Lake Scenic Spot in Ningxia Hui autonomous region, which has vast waters, sandy scenes, graceful reeds and numerous migratory birds.

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2020-11-18 09:48:15
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Raise a Corpse from the Dead]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/18/content_1486426.htm

Jie shi huan hun, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to revive something outdated for future purposes. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-18 09:05:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Beat the Grass to Startle the Snake]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/18/content_1486425.htm

Da cao jing she, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to send a subtle warning to one's adversary. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-18 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Palace Museum, orchestra join hands for concerts on Chinese festivals]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/17/content_1486411.htm

The Palace Museum and China National Traditional Orchestra joined hands to present concert  Tiandi Yongle (Everlasting Joy of Heaven and Earth) on Nov 14 and 15 in Tianqiao Performing Arts Center in Beijing. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The Palace Museum in Beijing, also known as the Forbidden City, and China National Traditional Orchestra joined hands to present concerts highlighting Chinese festivals on Nov 14 and 15 in Tianqiao Performing Arts Center in Beijing.

Eight representative Chinese festivals -- the Spring Festival, the Lantern Festival, the Qingming Festival, the Dragon Boat Festival, the Qixi Festival, the Mid-Autumn Festival, the Double Ninth Festival and The Winter Solstice -- were chosen for the concerts titled Tiandi Yongle (Everlasting Joy of Heaven and Earth).

This year marks the 600th anniversary of the constructional completion of the Forbidden City, China's imperial palace from 1420 to 1911, and the 60th anniversary marking the founding of the orchestra. Yongle is also the name of the reign of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) emperor who ordered the construction of the Forbidden City.

Various traditional musical instruments, dancing and chanting of poetry, along with high-tech multimedia elements such as motion capture equipment, were combined for the show, borrowing cultural elements from the Palace Museum.

The show will later tour around the country and will launch cross-border collaboration with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and Detroit Symphony Orchestra.


The Palace Museum and China National Traditional Orchestra joined hands to present concert  Tiandi Yongle (Everlasting Joy of Heaven and Earth) on Nov 14 and 15 in Tianqiao Performing Arts Center in Beijing. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The Palace Museum and China National Traditional Orchestra joined hands to present concert  Tiandi Yongle (Everlasting Joy of Heaven and Earth) on Nov 14 and 15 in Tianqiao Performing Arts Center in Beijing. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The Palace Museum and China National Traditional Orchestra joined hands to present concert  Tiandi Yongle (Everlasting Joy of Heaven and Earth) on Nov 14 and 15 in Tianqiao Performing Arts Center in Beijing. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The Palace Museum and China National Traditional Orchestra joined hands to present concert  Tiandi Yongle (Everlasting Joy of Heaven and Earth) on Nov 14 and 15 in Tianqiao Performing Arts Center in Beijing. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The Palace Museum and China National Traditional Orchestra joined hands to present concert  Tiandi Yongle (Everlasting Joy of Heaven and Earth) on Nov 14 and 15 in Tianqiao Performing Arts Center in Beijing. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-11-17 13:17:02
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Take Away a Goat in Passing]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/17/content_1486387.htm

Shun shou qian yang, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how one exploits an opportunity to achieve one's own goal. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-17 09:05:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Sacrifice the Plum for the Peach]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/17/content_1486385.htm

Li dai tao jiang, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how one sacrifices the less important to protect the vital. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-17 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Thai association proposes China travel-bubble plan]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/17/content_1486379.htm

Visitors pose for pictures at a flower farm in Chiangmai, Thailand. Most tourists in the country are currently Thais because of international-travel restrictions. [Photo by Zhang Keren/Xinhua]

BANGKOK-The Association of Thai Travel Agents on Thursday submitted an open letter to Thailand's Tourism and Sports Ministry requesting Chinese tourists be allowed to enter the country by January under the travel-bubble program.

The program allows the entry of tourists without the need for them to undergo 14-day mandatory quarantine.

Speaking on Thursday, ATTA President Vichit Prakobgosol said that Thailand has the potential to create travel bubbles with parts of China thanks to China's success in containing the novel coronavirus.

He said there are currently some low-risk provinces in China that have reported no new local cases for more than 150 days.

"However, as a precaution, all tourists should continue to wear facemasks during trips, download a tracking application and use services from operators that meet the tourism-safety standard of the Safety and Health Administration."

If Thailand can successfully establish a travel-bubble plan with China, the association estimates that the country will receive at least 300,000 travelers per month and generate tourism income of more than 15 billion baht ($495.7 million), Vichit says.

But if Thailand's borders remain closed with no new international arrivals by the first quarter of next year, around 2 million workers in the tourism supply chain will lose their jobs, Vichit warns.

"The COVID-19 vaccine is likely to take until the middle of next year at the earliest to be successful," Vichit says. "Thai tourism-related businesses cannot wait too long as they are already reeling from the financial pain."

Vichit says the ATTA and other Thai tourism associations have made an appointment with Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha in November to discuss the travel-bubble plan.

Tourism and Sports Minister Phiphat Ratchakitprakarn says he does not have a problem with the ATTA's proposal.

"The first few groups of Chinese tourist arrivals posed no threat whatsoever," Phiphat says.

All of them tested negative for COVID-19 and have completed their 14-day quarantine and are now enjoying their visits, says the minister.

According to the tourism authority of Thailand, the number of foreign tourist arrivals hit almost 40 million in Thailand last year. The majority of the revenue came from short-haul markets in Asia, with almost 10 million visitors arriving from China.

However, with some international-travel restrictions still in place, 93 percent of the tourists are currently Thais.

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2020-11-17 07:54:18
<![CDATA[China adds 752 ancient manuscripts to state protection catalog]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/16/content_1486371.htm

China has added a total of 13,026 ancient manuscripts to the catalog for state protection since the program was initiated in 2007.[Photo/Xinhua]

A total of 752 valuable ancient manuscripts and books have been added to the catalog for state protection, according to the Ministry of Culture and Tourism.

The manuscripts and books contain Buddhist scriptures, literary collections, and masterpieces written in ethnic minority languages, according to the ministry.

The ministry has called for more efforts from culture and tourism authorities at all levels to protect and benefit from the precious ancient manuscripts.

China has added a total of 13,026 ancient manuscripts to the catalog for state protection since the program was initiated in 2007.

The ministry has also listed 23 more institutions as major guardians of rare ancient manuscripts, bringing the total to 203.

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2020-11-16 15:41:35
<![CDATA[Students learn the art of Ru porcelain in Henan]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/16/content_1486345.htm

Students in Baofeng county, Henan province, learn about the making process of Ru porcelain tea sets in the workshop of RuCI enterprise on November 15.[Photo/Xinhua]

More than 90 students of Xichengmen Primary School went to local Ru porcelain enterprises to experience the production skills of Ru porcelain in Baofeng county in Henan province, the site of Ru Guan kiln in the Song Dynasty (AD 420-479) and famous for Ru porcelain, on Nov 15. They visited Ru porcelain works and felt the charm of Ru porcelain culture with the guidance of Ru porcelain artists under the theme "feeling the culture of Ru porcelain from intangible cultural heritage".


Students of Xichengmen Primary School in Baofeng county, Henan province, watch Ru porcelain products in the exhibition hall of Ru porcelain enterprises.[Photo/Xinhua]


The workers explain the production process of Ru porcelain products to primary school students in the workshop of Huiru kiln company in Baofeng county, Henan province.[Photo/Xinhua]


A primary school student watches the casting in the workshop of Huiru kiln company in Baofeng county, Henan province, on November 15.[Photo/Xinhua]


The students of Xichengmen Primary School in Baofeng county, Henan province, experience the production of clay body in the workshop of Ru porcelain enterprise on Nov 15.[Photo/Xinhua]


Students of Xichengmen Primary School in Baofeng county, Henan province, experience casting in the workshop of Ru porcelain enterprise on November 15.[Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-11-16 14:42:44
<![CDATA[How to make a Chinese-style notebook | Girl City]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/16/content_1486343.htm

Girl City invites an ancient book repairer in China to show us how to make a Chinese-style notebook by yourself at home.

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2020-11-16 11:17:30
<![CDATA[Exhibition remembers three modern master artists]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/16/content_1486342.htm

A visitor looks at works of China's painting master Zhang Daqian at an exhibition in Chongqing, Nov 15, 2020. An exhibition featuring three of modern China's painting masters Qi Baishi, Xu Beihong and Zhang Daqian was unveiled on Nov 7 at Xu's former residence Peon Art Museum in Chongqing, with over 40 selected painting works, documents and letters of the three artists on display. Xu Beihong, Zhang Daqian and Qi Baishi are three pioneers in the reform of classical Chinese ink art in the 20th century. [Photo/Xinhua]


A visitor looks at works of China's painting master Qi Baishi at an exhibition in Chongqing, Nov 15, 2020. An exhibition featuring three of modern China's painting masters Qi Baishi, Xu Beihong and Zhang Daqian was unveiled on Nov 7 at Xu's former residence Peon Art Museum in Chongqing, with over 40 selected painting works, documents and letters of the three artists on display. Xu Beihong, Zhang Daqian and Qi Baishi are three pioneers in the reform of classical Chinese ink art in the 20th century. [Photo/Xinhua]


An exhibition featuring three of modern China's painting masters Qi Baishi, Xu Beihong and Zhang Daqian was unveiled on Nov 7 at Xu's former residence Peon Art Museum in Chongqing, with over 40 selected painting works, documents and letters of the three artists on display. Xu Beihong, Zhang Daqian and Qi Baishi are three pioneers in the reform of classical Chinese ink art in the 20th century. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-11-16 10:59:38
<![CDATA[A cloud in the desert]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/16/content_1486339.htm

People in Zhongwei, Ningxia Hui autonomous region, use wheat straw to pave checkerboard sand barriers that stabilize the encroaching desert. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Like many, the first thing Ji Xuexin does every working day is look at her phone. Not, however, to check the latest updates and notifications on social media. As a sanitation inspector in Zhongwei, Northwest China's Ningxia Hui autonomous region, she will open the sanitation cloud app to check the status of the sanitation workers in her jurisdiction and upload the most recent sanitation data.

Since 2016, Zhongwei has been running an intelligent sanitation cloud management system that combines technologies including geographic information systems, the Internet of Things and mobile internet.

The city has set a standard that, on its streets, fly ash per square meter should be less than 5 grams and that rubbish and litter should be removed within five minutes. The sanitation cloud app is helping to achieve that goal by distributing resources more effectively.

Located to the south of China's fourth-largest desert, the Tengger, Zhongwei strives to develop its cloud computing industry together with desertification control and has seen initial success.

According to Li Bin, deputy director of Zhongwei cloud computing and big data development bureau, the development of the cloud computing industry in Zhongwei started in 2013 and it has been taking active measures to build its Western Cloud Base into one of the country's major agglomeration areas for a data center.

"We have attracted over 140 companies from home and abroad to settle in our cloud base, including Amazon Web Services, Qihoo 360, Meituan and Meili Cloud," Li says. "In the first three quarters, we have accomplished fixed asset investment of 780 billion yuan ($117.8 million) and the accumulated fixed asset investment has reached 7.42 billion yuan."

Li recalls that when AWS were looking for a location to build its data center in China, they visited 83 cities and listed 282 conditions. "In the end, they concluded that Zhongwei is the best location."

Li thinks there are several advantages that Zhongwei has when looking to develop a cloud base. "First, Zhongwei is within 2,000 kilometers of most of the major cities in China, which is an optimal distance for building a fiber-optic network," he says.

Second, the geological structure of the region is stable, so that it's incredibly rare for there to be an earthquake exceeding a magnitude of 7.0. The abundant land resources and the climate are also advantages-the annual average temperature is 8.8 C and there are over 280 days in a year that the atmospheric environment is excellent.

"Last but not least, clean energy creates over half the generated electricity in Zhongwei and the price of water and natural gas is low," Li says.


People in Zhongwei, Ningxia Hui autonomous region, use wheat straw to pave checkerboard sand barriers that stabilize the encroaching desert. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The electricity price is at 0.36 yuan per kilowatt-hour, which is quite low in China.

"The weather here can help the cloud base utilize technology that enables the wind to cool the servers, which makes the power usage effectiveness 1.1-much lower than the national average of around 1.8," he says.

In the first three quarters in 2020,100,000 more servers have been added to the cloud base in Zhongwei and there are almost half a million servers in total.

"In the first three quarters, the total output value of information transmission and information technology service industries has occupied one third of the gross domestic product in Zhongwei," Li says.

Local companies have also been eliminating industries that involve high energy consumption and high pollution and embracing cloud technology.

The Meili Cloud Computing Industry Investment Co has transferred its focus from a papermaking company which was once the only listed company in Zhongwei. It's now building a data center and photovoltaic power station.

For local people, cloud technology has changed from a strange concept to something that they all relate to-the city has developed many cloud services including government administration, sanitation, education and tourism, bringing more convenience to their daily lives.

According to Zhu Wenjun, deputy general manager of Zhongwei Shapotou scenic spot, cloud technology has been used to better serve tourists.

"For example, before utilizing the new technology, a ticket could only be used once. Now, with facial recognition technology and data storage, tourists can enter our scenic area the following day," Zhu says.

He adds that the data can also analyze the tourists' background information, which helps them to design future tourism products and advertisement targeting.


The Baotou-Lanzhou railway, which runs near the Yellow River, has not experienced problems with sand along its Zhongwei section since 1992. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Chinese magic cube

In the 1950s, the western side and northern half of Zhongwei was covered by the Tengger Desert, which once reached just 6 kilometers away from its urban areas-even a gentle breeze would blow dust and sand into homes.

In 1955, construction started on the Baotou-Lanzhou Railway-in Zhongwei, the railway needed to cross the Tengger Desert six times, especially in Shapotou area, as the shifting sand was a big threat to the tracks.

According to Zhang Kezhi, 74, the former head of Zhongwei sand stabilization tree farm, experts from the former Soviet Union predicted that within 30 years, the railway would be buried by sand, and the reason was obvious: the vegetation coverage around the railway was less than 5 percent and the dry sand layer could be as thick as 10 to 15 centimeters.

Initially, Zhang and his team's main task was to clean the sand away from the railway as soon as it was found to be covered over. In 1968, the team changed their task-they used wheat straw to pave 1-meter-long checkerboard sand barriers onto the sand to stabilize it, before sowing grass seeds and planting shrubs.

"If you place the square too small, the sand will bury the straw square; and if it is too loose, it won't stabilize the sand and will be easily broken by the wind. The 1 x 1 meter square proved to be the most suitable for halting the movement of the shifting sand dunes," Zhang says.

The straw is put on top of the sand before being partially buried into the sand by shoveling so that around 15 centimeters is above the sand and 10 centimeters is below the surface.


The development of the cloud computing industry in Zhongwei started in 2013 and it has been taking measures to build its Western Cloud Base into one of the country's major agglomeration areas for a data center. [Photo by Hu Dongmei/China Daily]

Tang Ximing, deputy head of Zhongwei sand stabilization tree farm, invented a tool to place plants deep into the sand, which has since been used by many other provinces and saved funds of over 60 million yuan.

Since 1992, the straw squares have not only protected the railway but also stopped the sand from flowing into the city.

Zhongwei sand stabilization tree farm was enlisted in the Global 500 Roll of Honor for Environmental Achievement established by United Nations Environment Programme in 1994.

The straw square method to stabilize sand is called the Chinese magic cube, and it has attracted experts and officials from over 60 countries to come and learn about it.

Zhongwei has finished building the straw square and growing shrub wood, which now covers 28,000 hectares, and has built a 60-kilometer long tree belt for wind management and sand stabilization.

The distance between the desert and Zhongwei has now been pushed back to over 20 kilometers.

Hu Dongmei contributed to this story.

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2020-11-16 07:59:48
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Conceal a Dagger in a Smile]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/16/content_1486341.htm

Xiao li cang dao, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to hide hostility behind fake friendliness. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-16 09:05:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Watch the Fire Burning from Across the River]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/16/content_1486340.htm

Ge an guan huo, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to observe the enemies' internal feuds and enter the fight when they are exhausted. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-16 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Xinjiang, a bright wonderland in winter]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/13/content_1486317.htm

The spectacular Tianchi scenic area in winter at Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Diverse geographical features, rich culture and unique cuisine have made Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region one of the most popular destinations in China in recent years, and tourism has become a pillar industry there.

As winter arrives, Xinjiang has both stunning scenery and a wide variety of winter activities on offer - whether it's the wonderland of the river valley in Ili Kazak autonomous prefecture, or the ski resorts in Urumchi and Altay, hailed by many as the "Snow Capital of China".

The snow season in Altay lasts as long as seven months, or eight months in its mountain areas, and average snow thickness along the Altay Mountains is more than one meter. The snow there is known as "powder snow", which is believed to be the most suitable for sports.


A snow resort in Urumqi, capital of the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Currently, 13 scenic spots in Xinjiang have gained a national 5A-level rating, the highest in the country. In 2019, Xinjiang received 213 million tourists from China and abroad, which helped the region rake in tourism revenue of 363.3 billion yuan ($55 billion).

"The tourism income of Xinjiang have been rising increasingly in recent years, up 30 percent year-on-year for four consecutive years," said Ma Xuguo, deputy director of Xinjiang's culture and tourism department, at a tourism promotion conference in Beijing on Wednesday.

To lure more travelers, local tourism administrations unveiled a series of preferential policies at the promotion conference, including free admission for A-level attractions in Ili Kazak autonomous prefecture and Altay.


Dancers perform at a tourism promotion event in Beijing on Nov 11, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Traditional baked flatbread and staple foods in Xinjiang. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-11-13 16:19:17
<![CDATA[Contest aims to bring Chinese and Australian people closer]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/13/content_1486310.htm

Representatives from the China Tourism Office and the China Cultural Center in Sydney, and Australian New Express Media Group pose for a photo at the launch ceremony of the contest, Nov 12, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

A contest focusing on Chinese culture and tourism was launched in Sydney on Thursday. The organizers, the China Tourism Office and the China Cultural Center in Sydney, and Australian New Express Media Group, held a launch ceremony on the same day.

The contest admits entries in three categories- calligraphy and paintings, photos, and short videos. Each category is divided into three groups: children, teenagers and adults, based on participants' age. The prizes include the Grand and the First, Second and Third. Winners will have the chance to show their works at the center in March 2021.

Xiao Xiayong, director of the cultural center and the tourism office, said the contest is set to enhance the two nations' cultural exchange, as the tourism in Australia was severely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Xiao Xiayong, director of the cultural center and the tourism office gives a speech at the launch ceremony of the contest, Nov 12, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-11-13 13:54:25
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Pretend to Advance Down the Path While Taking Another Hidden Path]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/13/content_1486296.htm

An du chen cang, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to distract with a sleight of hand. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-13 09:05:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Create Something Out of Nothing]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/13/content_1486295.htm

Wu zhong sheng you, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes creating momentum out of nothing in order to create something real. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

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2020-11-13 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Rental scheme brings relief in more ways than one]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/13/content_1486288.htm

The community rental display area that allows people to rent rehabilitation assistive devices makes its debut at the 2020 Shanghai International Exhibition of Senior Care, Rehabilitation Medicine, and Healthcare at the Shanghai New International Expo Center on Oct 28.[Photo by He Qi/China Daily]

Rehabilitation assistive devices for the elderly and disabled often come with hefty price tags. Thankfully, Shanghai residents who cannot afford to spare the cash have been presented with another option since last year-rental.

In June 2019, the city was designated as a national pilot area for the community rental of rehabilitation equipment, with some 70 neighborhoods in 16 districts across the city listed as the first batch of pilot units.

The move to make these assistive devices available for rental has been well received by users, as evidenced by the reception to the recent 2020 Shanghai International Exhibition of Senior Care, Rehabilitation Medicine, and Healthcare that was held at the Shanghai New International Expo Center.

The exhibition, which took place from Oct 28 to 30, drew large crowds of the elderly, among whom was 68-year-old Li Donghai, who was in search of an auxiliary brace for his knee.

"I used to buy assistive equipment to relieve joint pain, but the cheap one I had was hardly effective. On the other hand, I don't think the more expensive ones in the market are worth the money. Being able to rent a device instead is much more convenient," says Li, who suffers from arthritis.

One of the products that Li was viewing was Unloader One, a brace designed by US brand Ossur. According to Liu Fujun, the product manager of Ossur, the retail price of Unloader One is about 13,000 yuan ($1,970). The company is now leasing these units for 400 yuan per month.

"Compared with the traditional brace, which usually costs between 2,000 and 4,000 yuan, the price of Unloader One is very high, but it is much more effective. Considering the spending power of the elderly, leasing may be a better option for them," says Liu.

"Leasing also provides a chance for the elderly to try the product for some time and decide if they should buy it."

Liu adds that Ossur has made its assistive devices available for rent since the start of November. To date, nearly 200 devices have already been rented.

As the city with the fastest-aging population in China, Shanghai has a high demand for rehabilitation equipment. To address this issue, the municipal government had in 2017 planned to accelerate the development of the rehabilitation assistive devices industry and promote the development of the rental market of such devices.

Following the introduction of 70 rental sites in the city in 2019, another 80 rental sites have been added this year. According to the city's civil affairs bureau, the rental service network of rehabilitation equipment will cover the entire city by 2021.

During the pilot period, those who qualify for the rental scheme-those aged 60 and above, people with some disabilities and low-income individuals-can apply for a maximum subsidy of 50 percent of the rental price. The maximum subsidy per person cannot exceed 3,000 yuan per year.

"Most people still don't know about the rental scheme. I think only three out of 10 people attending the exhibition or a related event know about it," says Zhu Yanjing, manager of Yinchuang Life, a global platform that specializes in the innovation and exchange of products suited for the elderly.

"Since the rental prices are relatively attractive and users can also enjoy government subsidies, the cost of leasing is ultimately much lower than purchasing."

To date, more than 300 people have rented assistive devices through Yinchuang Life, which is cooperating with more than 10 communities in the city and five pension institutions to provide the rental service.

"In the future, our main goal will be to promote the leasing service, because our goal is to better the lives of the elderly. We will have more assistive equipment available for rental soon," says Zhu.

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2020-11-13 08:10:23
<![CDATA[Exhibition on Grand Canal marks a nation's wisdom]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/12/content_1486271.htm

A section of Tianhou Palace in Tianjinon show. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The Grand Canal, dating back to the fifth century BC, was the longest artificial waterway in the world. It consisted of three sections built in different periods to connect Beijing and Hangzhou, in East China's Zhejiang province, unifying the powerful northern and the fertile southern regions in ancient China.

Paddling for A Thousand Miles, an exhibition now underway at the National Museum of China in Beijing, navigates the excavation and development of the Grand Canal, which stretches some 2,700 kilometers.

The exhibition running until March 1 shows paintings, documents, artifacts and models, and reviews how construction of the Grand Canal facilitated technological advancements in water conservancy and transportation management. The waterway helped boost the economy in regions it ran through and cultural communications between North and East China, through which viewers can get a glimpse of the creativity and wisdom of ancient Chinese.


A section of Qing Emperor Qianlong Inspecting the South on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A section of Tianhou Palace in Tianjin on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A section of Tianhou Palace in Tianjin on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A section of Tianhou Palace in Tianjin on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A painting showing water conservancy project on display. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A Qing Dynasty painting shows riverside landscape along a section of the Grand Canal. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-11-12 14:43:53
<![CDATA[Online exhibition showcases beauty of Guizhou]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/12/content_1486273.htm

An online exhibition featuring Guizhou province was launched by the China Cultural Center in Sydney on Nov 11, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

A virtual photo exhibition, featuring Southwest China's Guizhou province, was launched by the China Cultural Center in Sydney on its website and social media platforms on Wednesday.

Forty pictures on show capture the natural wonders and cultural heritage of Guizhou.

As the only province without plains, 90 percent of Guizhou is covered with mountains and hills.

The province also is famous for its ethnic diversity, resulting in a more colorful local culture.


An online exhibition featuring Guizhou province was launched by the China Cultural Center in Sydney on Nov 11, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Guizhou province was launched by the China Cultural Center in Sydney on Nov 11, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Guizhou province was launched by the China Cultural Center in Sydney on Nov 11, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Guizhou province was launched by the China Cultural Center in Sydney on Nov 11, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Guizhou province was launched by the China Cultural Center in Sydney on Nov 11, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Guizhou province was launched by the China Cultural Center in Sydney on Nov 11, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-11-12 15:56:31
<![CDATA[Traditional Chinese instruments tuned for Africa Day in Wellington]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/10/content_1486188.htm

Wellington's annual Africa Day is held on Nov 7, 2020, New Zealand. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]

The annual Africa Day in Wellington, New Zealand, opened on Nov 7. More than 3,000 locals attended the event.

Andy Foster, mayor of Wellington, delivered a speech at the opening ceremony. He said the 2020 Africa Day was originally scheduled to be held in May, but was postponed due to COVID-19.

African music and dances were the theme of the ceremony, with the atmosphere enhanced by the performances given by people from Latin America, Asia and Pacific islands. Many local bands participated in the Africa Day, including Ras Judah & Culture Embassy, Lala Simpson and Choir.


Wellington's annual Africa Day is held on Nov 7, 2020, New Zealand. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]

The China Cultural Center in Wellington also joined the event. A trio performance of erhu, African drum and drum kit, Li Caiyi, an erhu teacher from the center, Sam Manzanza, an artist called ‚ÄúKing of Afro Beat‚Ä?in Wellington, and Wendell Cooke, head of External Liaison Affairs of the center, all took part in the event.

Cooke said he and the other two performers got to know each other during an event of the cultural center. In March, they planned to perform together. However, the show had to be delayed because of the pandemic.

Members of Parliament Paul Eagle and Greg O'Connor and many government officials attended the activity.


Wellington's annual Africa Day is held on Nov 7, 2020, New Zealand. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington's annual Africa Day is held on Nov 7, 2020, New Zealand. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington's annual Africa Day is held on Nov 7, 2020, New Zealand. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington's annual Africa Day is held on Nov 7, 2020, New Zealand. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington's annual Africa Day is held on Nov 7, 2020, New Zealand. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington's annual Africa Day is held on Nov 7, 2020, New Zealand. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington's annual Africa Day is held on Nov 7, 2020, New Zealand. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington's annual Africa Day is held on Nov 7, 2020, New Zealand. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington's annual Africa Day is held on Nov 7, 2020, New Zealand. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington's annual Africa Day is held on Nov 7, 2020, New Zealand. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington's annual Africa Day is held on Nov 7, 2020, New Zealand. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington's annual Africa Day is held on Nov 7, 2020, New Zealand. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington's annual Africa Day is held on Nov 7, 2020, New Zealand. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington's annual Africa Day is held on Nov 7, 2020, New Zealand. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Wellington's annual Africa Day is held on Nov 7, 2020, New Zealand. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]

 

 

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2020-11-10 14:57:16
<![CDATA[Hong Kong chef teaches you to cook three cup ducks]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/12/content_1486245.htm

Ingredients

half duck (carved into pieces) :

6 slices ginger

3 cloves garlic (crushed)

3 pcs shallot (crushed)

1 bunch Taiwan basil (rinsed and teared up)

7 to 8 sections scallion (rinsed)

3 Tbsps cooking oil

Three cup ducks. [Photo by Grace Choy/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Sauce:

160ml Shaoxing wine

2 Tbsps light soy sauce

2 Tbsps oyster sauce

2 pcs rock sugar

1 tsp salt

400ml Hot Water (200 ml + 200ml)

Instructions:

1. Rinse the duck pieces and set aside.

2. Heat up a wok on high heat without adding oil or water. Add 2 slices of ginger and the duck meat. Saute for 3 to 4 mins. Take out and drain.

3. In the same wok, heat up 3 Tbsps of oil on high heat. Add ginger, shallot diced and duck pieces into the wok. Add light soy sauce and oyster sauce Saute for 1 min.

Three cup ducks. [Photo by Grace Choy/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

4. Pour in 200ml of hot water and stir well. Cook uncovered for 8 mins, stirring intermittently.

5. When time is up, add the remaining 200ml of hot water. Add rock sugar and stir well. Put on the lid and braise on high heat for 20 mins.

6. When time is up, add the Shaoxing wine, Taiwan basil and scallion. Stir well. Put the lid back and braise for another 10 mins. Turn off heat and salt to taste. Enjoy!

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2020-11-12 11:16:56
<![CDATA['Lockdown' word of the year for Collins Dictionary]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/12/content_1486244.htm

A screenshot of the Collins Dictionary webpage announcing "lockdown" as the word of the year for 2020. [Photo/Collinsdictionary.com]

"Lockdown" was chosen as Collins Dictionary's word of the year for 2020 due to the dramatic increase in usage during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Collins defines lockdown as "the imposition of stringent restrictions on travel, social interaction, and access to public spaces."

"The government imposed a national lockdown to prevent the spread of the virus," one of its sample usage sentences reads.

A total of 250,000 usages of "lockdown" have been registered during 2020. Last year, the number was just 4,000.

The word "pandemic" was also shortlisted. According to Collins, usage of the word "coronavirus‚ÄĚincreased 35,000-fold year-on-year. Other COVID-19 related words include "furlough," "self-isolate," "social distancing" and "key workers."

Other terms that made the list reflect big social events, such as "BLM," which stands for "Black Lives Matter," according to Collins. The term saw a 581 percent increase in usage.

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2020-11-12 10:41:06
<![CDATA[Visiting China Online: Xinjiang]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/12/content_1486242.htm

[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

For those planning a trip to NW China's Xinjiang, the must-sees include: Xinjiang Tianshan - a UNESCO World Heritage Site - Taklimakan Desert, Tianchi Lake and the Grand Bazaar. 


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-11-12 09:44:46
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Make a Feint to the East While Attacking in the West]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/12/content_1486241.htm

Sheng dong ji xi, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes the act to confuse or mislead the adversary by saying one thing while doing another. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategiesto find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

]]>
2020-11-12 09:05:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Loot a Burning House]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/12/content_1486240.htm

Chen huo da jie, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to capitalize on the enemy's chaos. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategiesto find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

]]>
2020-11-12 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Chinese brands: Seal your look with lipstick]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/11/content_1486232.htm

Traditional Chinese lip balm. [Photo/tmall.com]

If you ever watched Chinese costume drama, it is difficult not to notice the way the women do makeup. They often put a small piece of red paper between their lips, an ancient version of lipstick.

As today's Chinese young people have a stronger attachment to traditional culture, many women choose to use this paper again .

Compared to common lip sticks, which are often mass produced chemically, the ancient-style lipstick paper is naturally made from flowers.

In that field ‚Ä?using flowers in cosmetics ‚Ä?Nanjing Agriculture University is making new strides.


Lipstick paper. [Photo/tmall.com]

In October, the college launched a new creation, chrysanthemum lipstick. Since the dried flowers often appear in Chinese people's tea and food, the product soon became a hot search topic on social media.

These days, the Chinese lipstick market is no longer the sole territory of international brands.

A lipstick scarved with the poem by great poet Li Bai from the Tang Dynasty. [Photo/tmall.com]

More domestic brands are being created, often with fancier looks and traditional backgrounds.

In recent years, the Palace Museum designed a series of creative culture products, including lipsticks. The colors, with poetic names, are inspired by the colors of cultural relics in the museum. And the patterns of the dresses worn by ancient concubines who once lived in the Forbidden City were printed on the packages.


Florasis' lipstick. [Photo/tmall.com]

Ethnic minority groups have joined in, too, with more creative styles.

Florasis, or Hua Xi Zi, a Hangzhou-based brand established in 2017, brought a series of lipsticks to market inspired by the Miao people's intangible cultural heritage. Both the package and the lipstick are designed with exquisite patterns.

Wayne Goss, a popular British makeup artist on YouTube, claimed Florasis was one of the best products he ever used.

A screen shot from Wayne Goss's video. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

"‚Ķflower essence or Chinese herbs‚Ä?which is just a very unique way of making products,‚Ä?the influencer said in a video.


Limited edition of lipsticks by the Palace Museum. [Photo/tmall.com]


Lipsticks by the Palace Museum.[Photo/tmall.com]


A box of lip balm by Qingpingdiao. [Photo/tmall.com]


By Florasis. [Photo/tmall.com]


[Photo/tmall.com]


[Photo/tmall.com]

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2020-11-11 16:00:56
<![CDATA[Shandong and Seoul hold cultural exchange events]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/09/content_1486109.htm

Art exchanges between Shandong and Seoul were launched in Seoul on Nov 6, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

A series of art exchanges between Shandong and Seoul were launched in Seoul on Nov 6.

The events were a contemporary art exhibition, a symposium and a concert. The exhibition featured 38 artists from East China's Shandong province and 40 South Korean painters. The art pieces included Chinese ink work, oil painting and traditional South Korean works. Some works were from five South Korean artists who were invited to visit Shandong in 2019.

Wang Yanjun, cultural counselor of the Chinese embassy to South Korea and director of the China Cultural Center, attended the opening ceremony.

In his speech, Wang extended congratulations to the launch of the event. He said 2020 marks the 28th year of the establishment of diplomatic relations between China and South Korea. The cultural exchanges between the two nations have had fruitful achievements in the past years.

Both delegates and representatives from the two countries presented the ceremony.




]]>
2020-11-09 14:15:36
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Relax and Wait for the Adversary to Tire Himself Out]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/11/content_1486207.htm

Yi yi dai lao, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to outsmart one's opponent with patience until there is a suitable opportunity to attack. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

]]>
2020-11-11 09:05:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Kill with a Borrowed Knife]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/11/content_1486206.htm

Jie dao sha ren, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to make use of someone else's resources to do the job expediently. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

]]>
2020-11-11 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Toying around]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/11/content_1486199.htm

A stop-motion animator works behind the scenes at an office of SteamArts, a stop-motion animation studio in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Stop-motion animation works provide a creative outlet for those who bring objects 'to life' on screen, Xing Wen reports.

Children and the young at heart often imagine their toys coming to life. At least, that's what animator Xu Ning believes. Part of it may be replicating the joy of childhood in later life. Part of it may also be maintaining a youthful outlook. But part of it is definitely redeeming a sense of creativity and wonder in adulthood.

As the son of a radio technician, Xu, 34, showed his manual dexterity from a very young age as he used screwdrivers, pincers, electric soldering irons and other tools to assemble or make mechanical toys and knead clay into the shape of animals.

He loved building toys out of metal, wood or other hardware, hoping that one day these "playmates "would come alive.

In 2006, Xu, a high school student, watched celebrated American filmmaker Tim Burton's stop-motion animated musical fantasy film, Corpse Bride. He was hooked. The old-school art of animating objects by moving them in small increments between individual photographic frames gave him a sense of creativity and allowed his toys to move.

"That's how it's going to work, to bring my toys to life," he realized and decided to further study the art form. The next year, he enrolled in the Animation School of Beijing Film Academy, where he had hands-on experience in puppet building for stop-motion animation. Later, in 2012, he applied for a master's program in the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California.

Three years later, after graduation, Xu was hired by Laika Entertainment, an animation studio in the United States with a reputation for making hit stop-motion feature films and, fittingly, the producer of Corpse Bride. He was soon recognized as the renowned studio's first Chinese animator and was involved in the production of Kubo and the Two Strings, Missing Link and other widely-known stop-motion feature films.

"Frankly, before I actually got to know about the medium, I kind of worried about my career prospects," says Xu. "However, after I had more insight into it, I saw its unique charms."

He says the real materials, people's hands-on involvement and the change of natural light and shade mean that stop-motion animation constantly requires an artistic touch-something that might explain why it is frequently showcased at art or film festivals.

Wang Xiyi, 30, also started his career in the stop-motion animation industry as he loves handcrafting.

The graduate from Jiangnan University is now working as the leader for the prop-making team at Steam-Arts, a stop-motion animation studio in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province.

"It gives us a great sense of achievement, setting up miniature scenes and making figurines with our hands," says Wang.


Contributors on board

Wang's team members, most of whom are in their 20s, are from varied educational backgrounds, such as environmental or industrial art and computer science, but they all share an identical passion for handcrafting. "It's a young team. We are all on a journey to explore unknown fields and improve ourselves," says Wang.

The domestic industry does have a lack of experienced and talented figures who can help young practitioners progress efficiently, according to Wang.

In this aspect, Xu believes he can lend a hand. He left the US animation studio in 2018 and came back to China, aiming to share his knowledge and experience.

Xu has opened his own channel on the video-sharing platform Bilibili, where he uses short videos to offer a behind-the-scenes look at stop-motion animation techniques and plans to release tutorials that he hopes will attract newcomers to the art.

"I want to cultivate more domestic stop-motion animators. I believe stop-motion will have a stronger presence," he says.

He is confident in the future development of Chinese stop-motion animation, as the country boasts such traditional art forms as shadow play and puppetry, similar to the animation form. Moreover, the Shanghai Animation Film Studio had produced The Magic Brush, Tale of the Effendi and many other classic, well-made animated works, using the cinematographic technique decades ago.

"Anyone who owns a phone or a digital camera can start working with the technique. You can have lots of fun here," says Xu. He adds that in China's fledgling stop-motion film industry, practitioners are willing to help one another to move forward and be seen by investors and a larger audience.

Liu Di, a stop-motion animation director, points out that, currently, the industrial chain that supports the craft is not mature enough.

He adds that few universities in China have set a major for the medium to cultivate more professional talent.

"However, once the animation type becomes widely received by the audience, all these problems will be readily solved," he says.


Industry on the rise

Cheng Weifang, who co-founded SteamArts in 2015 with her husband, mainly covers preliminary planning, market analysis and business development for the studio, which has 60 employees. She believes that to achieve a sustainable development of the industry, it requires a clear business plan.

For instance, before the studio decided to produce Mini Town, an animated series that tells the stories of bear families that live in a utopian town, Cheng and her colleagues had already thought about the prospects of derivative products.

"The target audience of the series are children aged from 2 to 6. In China, the cartoon market for that age group is far from saturated," she says.

What is actually being manipulated in the animated work are plush puppets, which makes it easier to manufacture such derivative products as plush dolls, Cheng says, adding that high-quality plush toys can help the studio capture a largely uncontested market space in China.

"We hope to expand its range of application-the animation could be used in commercial advertising, art exhibitions and other fields," she adds.

The studio has also collaborated with primary schools to encourage students to create stories using objects around them.

Guided by the animators, children can bring their favorite fruits or toys to school, then make up a story based on the objects and create short stop-motion videos. This kind of training not only improves their photography and storytelling skills, but also helps to fire their imagination, says Cheng.

To reach out to global viewers, Cheng also took their animation work to international audiences at the Busan International Film Festival in South Korea and the Annecy International Animation Film Festival in France.

"The content of child-targeted animation knows no boundaries. I hope our original work fits in with universal values and gains popularity among foreign kids," she says.

For that goal, the animators are on their way to upgrading photographic equipment, as well as improving puppet-building techniques, precision parts processing and 3D printing. They are also honing the ability to combine stop-motion with both 2D and 3D animation as well as live-action film.

The animators are trying to evolve one of the earliest forms of 20th century animation by implementing 21st century technology into its production process, according to Cheng.

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2020-11-11 07:50:21
<![CDATA[<EM>Bridge</EM> film spurs interest in animation]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/10/content_1486191.htm
A scene from animed film Bridge. [Photo provided to China Daily]

This past summer, the 22-minute animated film Bridge led to a surge of interest in the format. The black-and-white film has obtained a rating of 8.8 points out of 10 on China's major review platform Douban. And it has notched up more than 1.2 million views on video-sharing platforms Bilibili and AcFun (Anime Comic Fun), since it premiere in June.









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2020-11-10 15:07:17
<![CDATA[Crocs steps forward in fight against poverty]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/10/content_1486182.htm
Crocs has donated more than 49,000 pairs of clogs to the Red Cross Society of the poverty-stricken district Yunnan in Guiyang, Guizhou province, at CIIE in Shanghai on Nov 6. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Footwear brand Crocs donated more than 49,000 pairs of clogs to the Red Cross Society of the poverty-stricken district Yunyan in Guiyang, Guizhou province, at China International Import Expo in Shanghai on Nov 6.

Besides shoes, supplies including clothing and stationery were also donated to the district by Crocs during the event.

Wang Qian, deputy secretary of the Yunyan district Party committee and mayor of Guiyang city, said the donations to the poverty-stricken counties in Yunyan showed a strong sense of social responsibility and care for medical staff workers and children in poverty-stricken areas.


As one of the characteristics of Crocs, it designs professional and suitable shoes for workers, including medical workers and cooks. According to Frankie Taylor, vice-president and general manager at Crocs China, the donation is made for people who need to spend a lot of their time walking, as clogs are easy to take off and clean and sanitize.

When the epidemic began in January, Crocs donated to front line medical workers in Wuhan, Hubei province. And during the pandemic period, it donated more than 860,000 pairs of medical shoes worldwide with a total value of 315.6 million yuan ($48 million).

To commemorate the brand's first time participation in the CIIE, Crocs also specially designed CIIE commemorative pairs of hand-painted Classic Clogs for the CIIE, the Yunyan district government of Guiyang city, and the Red Cross as a souvenir.


As a world-leading American footwear brand established in 2002, Crocs decided to participate in the CIIE for the first time since entering the Chinese market in 2006.

"Crocs team is happy to see what's happening with China's development overall, including the way consumers are boosting consumption, the industries that continue to open up, and the elevation of the expertise of its exports," said Taylor.

"We've been following CIIE since 2018, but this is the first year that we feel that China business is at a point that it's ready to showcase our brand mantra, products, and a lot of our point of views around what we can bring to Chinese consumers," Taylor added.


During the CIIE, Crocs presented diversified products in the exhibition booth on the theme Come As You Are, and encouraged Chinese consumers to stimulate stronger inner strength by being comfortable in their shoes. Four product areas were on display including cross-over collaborations, JibbitzTM charms, the Crocs Classic Clog, sandals, and products from Crocs At WorkTM collection.

"In the past three years, our strategy has been around bringing the global strategy around the products, brand, stores, and e-commerce channel back together and ensuring that we are able to localize to the Chinese consumer and into the market," said Taylor, who believes that their next step begins with the consumer.

"We want to get it right with a consumer first, right with a market first, to then really grow. We're thinking long-term China investment," he said.




 

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2020-11-10 14:07:07
<![CDATA[Chinese and British libraries look forward to new development]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/06/content_1486071.htm

An online forum between Chinese and British libraries is held on Oct 27, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

An online forum between Chinese and British libraries was held on Oct 27. Representatives from 11 libraries in China, including the National Library, Shanghai Library and Wuhan Library, attended the meeting. Their counterparts from the UK are the British Library, Living Knowledge Network and a dozen public libraries.

The theme centered on the new measures in public services to meet the challenge from the COVID-19 pandemic.

An online forum between Chinese and British libraries is held on Oct 27, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Jamie Andrews, head of Culture and Learning at the British Library said the present time is very special to the UK, China and each country in the world. The British Library is thinking about how digital technology enables it to work in a different and more "expansive" way.

Chen Ying, deputy-director of the National Library, delivered a speech at the forum. She said libraries in China and the UK have adopted efficient measures since the pandemic’s outbreak, a positive contribution to the control of the epidemic. The present difficulty eventually will be conquered and the libraries will see new development.


An online forum between Chinese and British libraries is held on Oct 27, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

 

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2020-11-06 16:40:50
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Cross the Sea by Deceiving the Sky]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/10/content_1486130.htm

Man tian guo hai, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how one hides one's intention in the obvious to avoid detection. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

]]>
2020-11-10 09:00:00
<![CDATA[36 Strategies: Besiege Wei to Rescue Zhao]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/10/content_1486129.htm

Wei wei jiu zhao, one of the Thirty-Six Strategies, describes how to avoid direct fighting by attacking the enemy's unguarded vital spot first. Watch this episode of Thirty-Six Strategies to find out more.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business, sports as well as their daily life, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

]]>
2020-11-10 09:00:00
<![CDATA[My COVID-19 quarantine experience in Beijing]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/10/content_1486128.htm
Zafar Uddin Mahmood, former consul general of Pakistan in Shanghai.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Since my first visit to China in 1976, this was the first time that I was away from China for almost eight months.

I had been fortunate enough to be present in China at every important moment since 1976. I was feeling uncomfortable not being able to visit China and experience the situation after the eruption of COVID-19.

I was in China last year but left on Jan 24, just before the Chinese New Year, with plans to return in March but could not travel as planned due to travel restrictions imposed by the Chinese authorities.

The moment the restrictions were relaxed, I applied for a fresh visa and made a flight booking to travel on Sept 24.

Knowing well that I will have to spend 14 days in very strict quarantine and having absolutely no idea about what kind of facilities and situation will be waiting for me, I decided to undertake this journey.

I boarded Air China flight CA 946 from Islamabad, which took off at its scheduled time.

To my surprise, I was the only Pakistani (foreigner) in the flight. The flight was uneventful and we landed around 7 am on the morning of Sept 25 at terminal 3 of the Beijing Capital International Airport.

For smooth handling of the incoming passengers, disembarkation was organized in batches of 50 passengers. I disembarked with the third group of passengers. It was a totally "new" airport with very few open areas and everyone wearing COVID-19 protected costumes.

After going through very smooth but long procedures of quarantine, immigration and customs, finally we reached the place to collect checked-in luggage, before boarding the buses to an unknown destination.

After a drive of almost 100 minutes we reached at our destination where, again, a procedure of disembarkation in groups took place. It took another hour till I was able to complete my registration with the medical team and hotel check in and reach my room.

After settling down in the small but clean room (where I had to spend next 14 days), I looked at the facilities and was quite satisfied.

Soon we got our first lunch, I called the hotel reception to check if Muslim or vegetarian food could be made available as I have some dietary restrictions. It was an unexpected "demand" for the receptionist and she promised to call back. After a short while, she called back and assured that Muslim food will be provided throughout the stay and I may eat without any worries. This response was indeed a pleasant surprise for me.

Next day, we were given a packet with some nice gifts and bilingual information kit with answers to some of the possible questions I had in my mind regarding my stay at the facility.

A hotel-based medical team used to call twice a day to check temperatures and ask if any help is needed.

Hot and delicious food was delivered three times a day. Everyday a different variety along with fruit, yogurt or juice was served.

The hotel staff were very helpful, always prompt in delivering items needed.

I had brought quite a few books with me. Beside watching my favorite TV programs, reading the books, chatting with family and friends on phone and having light exercise within the room, there was nothing else one could really do.

The final COVID-19 test was conducted on the 13th day and we were allowed to leave the facility the following day. A quarantine completion certificate was given to everyone including me, but mine was in English.

This lifetime experience was unique and I had absolutely no regrets in undergoing through this exercise.

China's capability, capacity and determination to meet any kind of challenges was proved once again. All concerned organizations from embassy, airline, immigration, health, customs, transport and hotel were working in close coordination and harmony. There was absolutely no panic and emergency like situation and everything was being handled very smoothly in a professional manner.

Through this note I wish to place on record my recognition and deepest appreciation for all the concerned departments and individuals who had been working with complete dedication and commitment under these abnormal circumstances.

From a foreigner's point of view, I wish to make the following suggestions for consideration.

1. Every incoming passenger must be handed over an information kit (about what is going to happen) before disembarking the plane. This will enable them to mentally prepare for the upcoming activities and estimated time required before reaching the quarantine facility.

2. At least one English language TV channel or newspaper may be made available at the facility.

3. Copies of the COVID-19 test reports and quarantine completion certificate must be provided in Chinese language to avoid problems at the time of check-in at hotels, buying plane and train tickets.

Thank you, China, for leading the world in the fight against COVID-19 and handling the situation in a very responsible manner without creating any panic for the public at large.

The author is the founder of Understanding China, former special envoy (with the status of an ambassador) for the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), and former consul general of Pakistan in Shanghai.

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2020-11-10 07:51:43
<![CDATA[Oil paintings on show reflect restrained sensibility]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/09/content_1486121.htm
Face No.4 [Photo provided to China Daily]

Noted oil painter Zhao Peizhi, born in Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, was exposed to the rich history and cultures of various ethnic groups living in the area during childhood. The experience helped define the themes of his work for a long time.

But Zhao, instead of depicting the usual, well-received joyful scenes of dancing and singing, employs a calm, nostalgic perspective to zoom in on the mentality of people of the Tajik group living in Xinjiang.

Restrained Sensibility, Zhao's solo exhibition at the China National Academy of Painting's gallery in Beijing until Tuesday, shows these paintings, in which the fine composition and palette bring out the depth of an ethnic group's past and the spiritual power of its people.










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2020-11-09 16:36:19
<![CDATA[Shenzhen, a young metropolis in South China]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/09/content_1486118.htm

Shenzhen city in Guangdong province is located on the southern tip of the Chinese mainland and neighboring Hong Kong.

China's first special economic zone was established here in 1980, and Shenzhen, once a humble fishing village, has grown into a modern metropolis.

As a green city, it was the first in China to win the Nations in Bloom Award. The weather here in Shenzhen is like spring and flowers bloom all year round.

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2020-11-09 15:31:18
<![CDATA[Visiting China online: Shenzhen]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/09/content_1486117.htm

[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

A picturesque coastal city, Shenzhen is a popular tourist destination in South China, where you can view Hakka-style houses, play on the beach and enjoy gourmet food.





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2020-11-09 15:28:52
<![CDATA[China's 'ice city' to offer subsidies to boost winter tourism]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/09/content_1486107.htm

Contestants work on a snow sculpture at the Sun Island International Snow Sculpture Art Expo park in Harbin, Northeast China's Heilongjiang province, Jan 3, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]

More than 400 cultural and recreational activities will be held in Harbin, capital of China's northernmost Heilongjiang province, with 48 million yuan (about $7.26 million) in subsidies granted to boost tourism during its upcoming ice and snow season.

The winter tourism season, scheduled to last from November to April 2021, will see various activities involving tourism, culture, arts, fashion, sports and economic cooperation in Harbin, dubbed China's "ice city."

The local government will distribute 48 million yuan in subsidies on online tourism platforms to attract more tourists to the city. Some tourism hot spots such as Harbin Ice and Snow World will offer discounted tickets.

To promote tourism amid the COVID-19 epidemic, Harbin will create diversified winter tourism products for tourists.

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2020-11-09 11:15:33
<![CDATA[Video series exploring kung fu strategies to premiere on Nov 10]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/09/content_1486106.htm

In every kung fu move, lies wisdom and strategy. A Chinese volume contains the insights of ancient monarchs, generals and advisers. Watch Searching for Kung Fu --Thirty-Six Strategies Short Video Series, to explore this fascinating aspect of Chinese culture.

The video series, produced by China Daily Website, is to premiere on China Daily APP starting Tuesday, with two episodes every day at 9 am. You can also follow the series on the official Facebook page and YouTube channel of China Culture.

The Thirty-Six Strategies is originally a collection of ancient Chinese strategies applied to military engagement. But today, many people use this ancient wisdom in business and sports, as well as their daily lives, often through unconventional means.

Searching for Kung Fu -- Thirty-Six Strategies is a short video series produced by China Daily Website and directed by Laurence Brahm from the United States.

Weaving together the 36 strategies and Chinese kung fu techniques, the short video series gives viewers a glimpse into the hidden secrets of the traditional martial art. It also reveals how ancient wisdom can be used to handle strategic challenges people face today, with both interesting examples in Chinese history and folklore, and refreshing case studies from contemporary life.

Shot in English, the short video series consists of 36 one-minute episodes and carries Chinese and English subtitles.

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2020-11-09 10:53:58
<![CDATA[EU-China literary festival set to launch online]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/06/content_1486074.htm The fifth EU-China International Literary Festival will start on Nov 12 and run through Dec 6, says Nicolas Chapuis, ambassador of the European Union to China, via an online launch ceremony on Nov 6.

In the light of global COVID-19 pandemic, the annual literary festival will be moved online. A total of 54 writers from China and the 27 member states of the EU will communicate with their counterparts and audiences through 27 online events that people can join in on Zoom.

This year, with the theme "Recovery/Reflection", the literary festival will examine how the world responds to the current global issues and the role of literature and thoughtful debates through the eyes of writers.

European writers that will be present in online events include David Wagner (Lives) from Germany, Colm Toibin (Brooklyn and The Master) from Ireland, Andres Barba (A Luminous Republic and Such Small Hands) from Spain, Stina Jackson (The Silver Road) from Sweden, Christophe Ono-Dit-Biot (Plonger) from France, Dorthe Nors (Mirror, Shoulder, Signal and Karate Chop) from Denmark, and Daan Heerma van Voss (The Last War) from The Netherlands.

On the China side are Liu Zhenyun (Cell Phone: A Novel and The Cook, the Crook, and the Real Estate Tycoon: A Novel of Contemporary China), Bi Feiyu (The Moon Opera and Massage), Liang Hong (China in One Village: The History of One Town and the Future of the World), and A Yi (A Perfect Crime).

"The distinguished writers represent different literary traditions," said Chapius.

"They will promote cross-border intellectual interactions and nurture new artistic visions."

Speaking of the theme of the festival this year, "Recovery/Reflection", Chapuis said that literature can indeed help us to better understand the world around us.

"Books can remind us not to forget our values when times are getting rough. Reading can enable us to reflect how to turn a crisis into an opportunity, to steer the ship safely through stormy weathers into a brighter future," he said.

Due to the global pandemic, this is the first online EU-China International Literary Festival.

"We all have to live through these extraordinary times. We have had to leave our comfort zones and find creative and innovative ways to keep connected with each other," Chapuis said.

"This has also been the case of the EU-China International Literary Festival. Moving this annual festival online does not only allow us to reach to listeners and readers all over China, it also demonstrates how highly we believe that culture can help to strengthen resilience during a crisis," he said.

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2020-11-06 08:15:30
<![CDATA[Designers bring their wares to the city of canals]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/07/content_1486081.htm

Suzhou Design Week, which aims to promote the city's new cultural economy that reflects the Yangtze River Delta integration strategy, was held between Oct 30 and Nov 6. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Suzhou event focuses on integration and interaction, and there's talk about the pandemic and beds as well.

Suzhou Design Week, which aims to promote the city's new cultural economy that reflects the Yangtze River Delta integration strategy, was held between Oct 30 and Nov 6 and, perhaps not surprisingly, COVID-19 managed to snatch a co-starring role.

The event, sponsored by Suzhou municipal government, emphasized exploring the path of creative design for urban renewal, community building and the digital transformation of the creative design industry in the 5G era. This would be done by increasing international collaboration to help Suzhou create a new urban business for creative design culture.

Under the theme "Industry Empowerment, Urban Interconnection", the exhibition area was placed in the streets of Suzhou, a reflection of how the new cultural economy would work.

Suzhou Design Week, which aims to promote the city's new cultural economy that reflects the Yangtze River Delta integration strategy, was held between Oct 30 and Nov 6. [Photo provided to China Daily]

A city block was transformed for the week, and more than 27 exhibitions, 25 events, three live broadcasts and 16 sub-venues were staged throughout the city.

Vittorio Sun Qun, deputy director of the Executive Committee of Suzhou Design Week, said: "We aim to have people participate and interact. In a place with history, you can both see culture and the dynamism of young people."

At the opening ceremony, the Yangtze River Delta Cultural Tourism Internet Partner Action Plan was officially launched.

This year's event paid closer attention to in-depth integration of content planning with Suzhou than was the case last year, striving to more closely mirror local characteristics and promote Suzhou's innovative creativity and urban culture.

The main forum of the week drew public attention to the increased awareness of healthy consumption awakened by COVID-19 and the increasing importance of digitalization prompted by people working from home.

On Oct 31 in the Suzhou Culture and New Economy Lecture Hall a forum organized by the Curatorial Laboratory of the School of Design and Creativity of Tongji University in Shanghai explored the effects of design on human interaction at different levels.


Suzhou Design Week, which aims to promote the city's new cultural economy that reflects the Yangtze River Delta integration strategy, was held between Oct 30 and Nov 6. [Photo provided to China Daily]

In a forum titled Human to Human, People to People, more than 10 designers, architects, artists and academics in various fields from around the globe expressed their thoughts on how design plays a role in promoting and shaping human interaction.

With social distancing and viral isolation, physical contact is now more restricted, and people are increasingly relying on computer screens to communicate with one another. Experts discussed the role of design in cultivating new ways of creating or promoting intimacy and communication.

Since Suzhou Design Week was inaugurated in 2018 it has adhered to the positioning of "city of design and city of industry", focusing on the three core topics: urban regeneration, industrial innovation and life aesthetics. [Photo provided to China Daily]

With the help of scientific and technological means and artistic expression, Bao Xiying, a graduate student in service design of the Royal Academy of Art, created an immersive experience device that can translate individual emotions for Wuhan urban communities. She hopes this helps in rebuilding personal emotions and interpersonal communication damaged by the epidemic.

Lucy McRae, a visiting professor from the Southern California School of Architecture in Los Angeles, a science fiction artist and film producer, presented an art installation drawing attention to the way interpersonal communication is conducted in the digital age: with a lack of physical contact.

The advent of the epidemic has accentuated the differences in the way we all live and at the same time revealed new ways of living that are emerging.


Since Suzhou Design Week was inaugurated in 2018 it has adhered to the positioning of "city of design and city of industry", focusing on the three core topics: urban regeneration, industrial innovation and life aesthetics. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Beatriz Colomina, a professor of architectural history, theorist and curator, and Mark Wigley, a professor of architecture, talked about their findings on the role of beds in the age of social media.

Multiple economic and cultural influences, backed by communications technology and smart devices, mean the bed has become an increasingly important venue for activities including work and leisure, they said.

For creative workers, communicating with others is part of their work, and the existence of a community among creators helps promote creativity. In response to the challenges and opportunities that the epidemic has brought to creative workers, Paola Antonelli, senior curator of architecture and design at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and Alice Rawsthorn, a design critic, launched the Emergency Design project to communicate with design practitioners through online dialogues.

Since Suzhou Design Week was inaugurated in 2018 it has adhered to the positioning of "city of design and city of industry", focusing on the three core topics: urban regeneration, industrial innovation and life aesthetics. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The co-founder and executive director of the Design Trust in Hong Kong, Marisa Yiu, through the "critical self-control" project, said she hopes to use 76 prototype designs created by different designers in response to the challenge of the epidemic to enhance the cohesion and social responsibility of the creative community.

Ian Wong, an industrial designer with rich practical and teaching research experience in Australia and China, said: "In the ever-changing social, technological and geopolitical realities, how can we design in various uncertain situations in the future, and at the same time establish a more harmonious relationship between groups, people, landscapes, ecosystems and other species?"

At the architectural practice level, whether it was reMIXstudio Critical Studio of Beijing, or Peoples' Architecture, which has offices in Beijing and Boston, all have adopted more flexible and interactive design concepts as they engage in the fast-changing and uncertain development of Chinese urban space.


Suzhou Design Week, which aims to promote the city's new cultural economy that reflects the Yangtze River Delta integration strategy, was held between Oct 30 and Nov 6. [Photo provided to China Daily]

In their view, the urban space that exists for a short time and is even built cheaply may be no less influential than the impact of traditional architectural spaces to the local community, and they adopted this concept again in this year's Suzhou Design Week.

StudioDrift of Amsterdam in the Netherlands uses algorithms to drive drones. By simulating various natural phenomena it uses technology as a carrier to express its reflections on the state of human existence and development: the seemingly disorderly natural phenomenon may still be inspiring the current development direction of human society as in the past.

Maria Lisogorkaya of Assemble, an interdisciplinary architecture, design and art collective in Britain, explored a new interdisciplinary division of labor, and Ewan McEoin, a curatorial member of the National Gallery of Victoria Triennial in Australia, presented a series on the latest interdisciplinary solutions driven by new systems, materials and technologies.

Since Suzhou Design Week was inaugurated in 2018 it has adhered to the positioning of "city of design and city of industry", focusing on the three core topics: urban regeneration, industrial innovation and life aesthetics. Among them, the Yangtze River Delta Innovation City Network benchmarked the UNESCO Creative City Network and launched the first Chinese implementation of a creative city network based on regional economic integration.a

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2020-11-07 10:01:21
<![CDATA[E-learning an emerging industry amid COVID-19 pandemic]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/07/content_1486080.htm If it had not been for COVID-19, Tom Watkins would have been in China now, serving as the China partner and managing director of WAY American Schools, a private US school using internet to teach students in China and Brazil and offering them an American High School Diploma program.

Being state superintendent of schools for the US Midwest state of Michigan in 2001-2005, Watkins is zealous for education. As early as in 2005, he has written an article on e-learning reform to offer a series of policy recommendations for Michigan.

"I recall the blank stares I encountered both in the United States and China in the early 2000s when I attempted to introduce blended e-learning into the mainstream,"Watkins told Xinhua."There was little appetite to be early adopters of this new technology and teaching modality into public and private schools in the United States and across the globe."

Then suddenly, online learning has popped into the spotlight.

In an initiative in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the University of Michigan in partnership with online learning platform Coursera is offering three popular online data science specializations to learners in China for $1 a month.

"The program's specializations included Python for Everybody, the most popular specialization on Coursera; Python 3 Programming; and Applied Data Science with Python," Don Jordan, senior public relations representative at UM told Xinhua.

In another initiative to support its newly enrolled graduate students in China, UM allows select graduate students to join the University of Michigan-Shanghai Jiao Tong University Joint Institute to take UM courses remotely.

UM is not the only US university that offers online courses to their students in China. University of Wisconsin-Madison is developing curriculum for how to academically succeed in a remote learning environment. The curriculum is to be offered in all 2020, John Lucas, executive director of University Communications at UW-Madison told Xinhua.

In Watkins' eyes, e-learning has its advantages, the most important of which are greater flexibility, personalized learning and globalization of education. By e-learning, one can learn 24 hours a day and seven days a week, access the study content an unlimited number of time, and easily tap global educators.

And the benefits are particularly concrete under current situation when the pandemic is still raging. If e-learning becomes a norm in the next few years, it may lead to restructuring, reform and reinventing in teaching and learning, Watkins said.

But a coin has both sides. Chinese and other foreign students' inability to return to universities in the United States has resulted in a loss of significant revenue for universities and opportunities for students to interact face-to-face, Watkins said.

Universities in Australia, Canada and the United States all face shortfall in applicants because of travel bans, he added.

Statistics of Institute of International Education show that prior to the pandemic, over 360,000 Chinese students were studying in US universities, and they spent $15 billion on tuition. Worldwide, Chinese students spend about $40 billion a year on overseas tuition.

"Change is easy, progress is always much more difficult," said Watkins. As the global pandemic has made it increasingly difficult for students at the high school and university level to travel globally, the use of remote or e-learning has enabled teaching and learning to continue without interruption.

"We have to get to the point where the only adjective that matters before school is quality," he said.

"When COVID-19 struck, wise policymakers and educators wasted little time casting blame or cursing the darkness but reached for new technology tools to enable quality teaching and learning to continue," he said.

Xinhua

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2020-11-07 10:05:22
<![CDATA[Everyday photos reveal the extraordinary lives of ordinary people]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/07/content_1486076.htm

A food delivery rider takes advantage of his leisure time to groom his beard in Jiang'an county, Sichuan province. [Photo by Kang Taisen/For China Daily]

Editor's note: Kang Taisen, a photographer who is over 60 years old, worked as a photojournalist in a newspaper in his early days, and he developed acute observation and photographing skills. He is keen on photographing ordinary people, and he is good at expressing the dramatic and vivid life scenes in our daily life. His photography is not only imbued with the imprint of the times and humor, but also with a life attitude that is thought-provoking. Kang has been constantly on the road, using his lens to take us face-to-face to the normal life of people in remote areas, without interference and exaggeration. His photos have become a true portrayal of the different stages in the process of our social development.

I started using my camera to create my own art in 1985-seven years after the reform and opening-up officially took place. At that time, I was deeply inspired by the works of some famous foreign photographers, especially their works on China. You must be curious about how I operate the camera. There's nothing strange about it-I just have my own technique. In the following 30 years, my lens has always been focusing on ordinary people. I realized that the most intuitive changes in China's reform and opening-up should be reflected in people's lives and the betterment of mankind. I have become accustomed to integrating the people I want into my photographs in my own way. A lot of people don't know I'm just like them-an ordinary person who is busy working for a living all day long with the same happiness and sorrow. Recording their lives actually reflects my own life. I also believe that ordinary people can do extraordinary things.


People are requested to wear a mask when taking public transportation in Xuyong county, Sichuan province. [Photo by Kang Taisen/For China Daily]

For many years, I like to repeatedly go to Hunan, Guizhou, Chongqing, Hubei, Sichuan and other places in China for on-the-spot observation. Photographing people is an artful endeavor. When I went to these provinces at the beginning of 30 years ago, many places were still poor, and I could clearly feel the huge gap there compared with the economically developed regions. This also prompted me to make up my mind to explore and record as many times as possible. I want to see changes, especially unpredictable changes at the time. This idea is full of inexplicable challenges and deep temptations. I did not use a specific person or a specific family as the entry point of my photos, but instead focused on the people as a whole. The bottom line is not to interfere, not to whitewash, and not to exaggerate. In addition to professional reasons, it is more out of my concern and compassion for the people.

One of the subjects I am most interested in is the local farmers' market. The local fair is a gathering place for the people in the outlying villages and towns to trade and purchase. I have photographed hundreds of bazaars in the past 30 years, and I can clearly feel the huge change from material scarcity in the past to material abundance today. People's transactions range from mostly self-produced agricultural products, agricultural tools to clothing, food and electronic products, besides the upgrading of the transportation vehicles used by people in the market. The change is immediately noticeable.


A vegetable seller who is leaning her elbow on her chin makes a striking resemblance with the movie star on the poster in Sinan county, Guizhou province. [Photo by Kang Taisen/For China Daily]

In recent years, I have been consciously capturing the fashion elements that are appearing more and more in small counties or towns. The kind of mix and match and the sudden appearance of dramatic elements often fascinate me. All that I can do is to use my lens to preserve as much of these real changes as possible. I don't deliberately use light, shadow and photo composition to create a sense of beauty, but I am used to using the most direct and simple images to simply present the situation I see.

Although one can only catch a glimpse of the life in it, but as time goes by, I have accumulated a lot of such photos. At least it is a true portrayal of people's life in a period of time, and it can be regarded as a photographic archive.


Street vendors are allowed after 7 pm every day in Yibin's East Street, Sichuan province. A chic girl has her nails done by a manicurist. [Photo by Kang Taisen/For China Daily]


The pattern on the T-shirt of a rural woman catches the attention of a child next to her at a market in Yongxing town, Meitan county, Guizhou province. [Photo by Kang Taisen/For China Daily]


A street vendor sells a wide variety of sunglasses at the local fair in Sinan county, Guizhou province. [Photo by Kang Taisen/For China Daily]


An old lady passing by watches a group practicing tai chi and cannot help but follow along in Yuanling county, Hunan province. [Photo by Kang Taisen/For China Daily]

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2020-11-07 09:23:21
<![CDATA[Festive China: Winter]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/07/content_1486075.htm

As the temperature gradually drops, some animals begin to hibernate and most plants fall into a long period of dormancy. Nevertheless, as snowfall gradually thickens, the winter season in China still pulses with vitality.

Watch this episode of Festive China to learn how Chinese people prepare for the bitter winter, find joy in the gifts nature brings, and the history behind customary practices.

Festive China is a series of short clips focusing on traditional Chinese festivals and festivities, the cultural connotations of traditional holidays, their development and changes, and how they manifest in today's China.

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2020-11-07 07:00:00
<![CDATA[Online show celebrates diplomatic relations between China and Italy]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/06/content_1485992.htm

A live show featuring dialogue between Chinese and Italian artists will be staged at 7:30 pm on Friday (GMT+8), with piano, violin, chorus, opera and ballet performances.

The online show celebrates the 50th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between Italy and China. Against the background of the global fight against COVID-19, the show presents the theme of "bright future" and expresses best wishes for the two countries.

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2020-11-06 17:30:00
<![CDATA[Top tips to help expats boost their consumption on 11-11]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/06/content_1486052.htm

[Photo/VCG]

Homo sapiens are usually classified into "pairs of opposites": the good and the evil; believers and non-believers; and haves and havenots. Martin Luther King Junior saw people as "children of light" and "children of darkness". In the words of "the ugly" Tuco (played brilliantly by Eli Wallach in Sergio Leone's The Good, the Bad and the Ugly), "The world is divided into two kinds of people: those who have friends and those who are lonely."

The globalized, digitalized world may have divided people into the tech-savvy and the tech-challenged. Since the Alibaba-conjured Singles Day has evolved into an online-and-offline global consumption festival, people must be either e-commerce experts or e-commerce ignoramuses. Most expatriates in China will likely find themselves in the ignoramuses' camp due to language constraints.

In the first three quarters of this year, China's online retails sales rose almost 10 percent year-on-year to exceed 8 trillion yuan ($1.19 trillion). Online sales of physical goods now account for a quarter of total sales. Clearly, domestic consumption helps sustain pandemic-defying economic growth, and is key to China's new "dual circulation" development pattern that will underpin the 14th Five Year Plan (2021-25).

Last year, Alibaba alone generated $38.4 billion in gross merchandise volume on Nov 11(up from just $0.82 billion in 2011, and $30.8 billion in 2018). Consumer surveys indicate Alibaba's GMV this 11-11 may exceed $40 billion.

E-commerce platforms, local media and social media may be forgiven if they don't feel any compelling need to make 11-11 expat-friendly. But, as the Tesco tagline goes, "every little helps". Expats, if they are empowered with 11-11 deals information, can help boost consumption. So, here are a few tips:

1) Planning: Prepare a wish list, stay focused, to avoid buying unnecessary stuff.

2) Research: Well before 11-11, familiarize yourself with products, brands, models, prices, as well as T&Cs for guarantee and returns, on various apps and bulk-buying groups, to ensure comparisons are accurate.

3) Partnerships: Team up with your knowledgeable Chinese friends or colleagues.

4) Apps: They offer bigger discounts compared to websites. JD, Tmall, Taobao and Pinduoduo reign supreme. A few days in advance, register or confirm your details and delivery address in Chinese languageŚQćtake your Chinese pals' or colleagues' help, if necessary. Link the apps to your Alipay and WeChat Pay. Customize notifications and permissions to stop the apps from turning pesky. Apps or websites are online marketplaces where sellers or e-tailers abound. There could be both general e-tailers that stock most brands and brands' exclusive e-stores. Figure how to wade through them all. The deeper you scroll, the lower the prices tend to fall. If you feel confident, graduate to niche shopping apps for travel, fashion, jewelry, cosmetics, furniture and food. Uninstall apps, if you will, after 11-11 frenzy subsides.

5) Translations: Translation apps of Baidu, Bing and Google are useful. Learn how to copy-paste Chinese text or screenshots of text from apps into translators, and vice versa. The right keywords will produce accurate in-app search results.

6) Groups: Shopping groups on WeChat offer deep-discount e-coupons on bulk buying. They simplify 11-11 shopping by allowing consumers to request group moderators for e-coupons for specific products.

7) Interactions: E-shoppers can interact with sellers directly via in-app texting. Use translation apps to communicate.

8) Refunds: Post-payment or post-delivery refund claims are to be expected. Inserting screenshots or copied text into translation apps, you can easily figure the e-buttons on shopping apps for refunds. E-tailers will guide you on the replacement or refund process. A new law protects e-commerce consumers in China.

9) Offline: Physical stores, too, offer irresistible 11-11 deals, not just apps that use AI, livestreaming, and augmented reality. Don't forget malls and hypermarkets.

10) Couriers: COVID has shown the world will struggle without them. Generously tip your couriers when those angels make their timely, impeccable deliveries. Reuse or recycle packaging material. Spiritualize your shopping.

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2020-11-06 08:10:57
<![CDATA[Lockdowns whet appetite for organic food]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/06/content_1486051.htm Southeast Asians turn to sustainable farms, urban gardens

For the past five years, farmer Michael Christian Simon has regularly supplied organic vegetables to a steady clientele of more than 30 families in the Malaysian state of Selangor.

"I started farming for my family, but I soon discovered that it's a viable and sustainable business," he said.

While Simon is happy that his passion has become a money-spinner, he did not expect the coronavirus pandemic to result in a windfall.

Soon after the Malaysian government imposed a movement control order, or MCO, in mid-March, the orders he received for produce rose to more than 100 as consumers forced to stay home bought food online.

Simon had to refuse most of these orders, as his farm can only produce 150 kilograms of vegetables a week. While the government has gradually eased lockdown measures in recent weeks, he believes that consumers will continue to buy directly from farmers, especially those who raise organic crops.

"In the past, Malaysians could buy vegetables everywhere, but because of the MCO, they started buying online. That's when they reached out to farmers and became more conscious of what and where they were buying," Simon said.

Online shopping is now the norm in Southeast Asia, as governments throughout the region have enforced lockdown and social distancing measures to check the spread of the virus.

However, these measures have temporarily disrupted the supply of food from farms to cities and towns, with public transportation services suspended and trading outlets shuttered.

This situation has prompted urban residents to seek alternative ways to buy food.

One of the most popular options is to buy directly from farmers through e-commerce sites and social media networks. Meanwhile, others residents have started to grow vegetables at home.

Mary Ann Sayoc, public affairs lead for the East-West Seed Group, or EWS, said urban gardening has been a big hit in the Philippines during community quarantine.

EWS supplies seeds to wholesalers and distributors, but outlets had to close in March when the Philippine government introduced lockdown measures. Sayoc said her company then went online and started selling seeds directly to consumers.

As of mid-September, it had sold more than 30,000 seed pouches, and Sayoc said EWS would not quit the retail market anytime soon.

"Home gardening is not just a fadŚQćit's part of the new normal. The pandemic has heightened public awareness of the importance of growing safe and nutritious vegetables for home consumption," she said.

Wong Jin Quan, program manager at management consultancy Padang & Co, which is based in Singapore, expects governments in Southeast Asia to promote urban gardening even after the pandemic.

"Urban gardening will continue to grow as governments recognize it as a potential alternative to diversify food sources," Wong said.

He added that as city population densities rise, food security will become a pressing issue.

"If anything, the pandemic has merely accentuated fault lines within global food supply chains and accelerated industry and governmental support for commercial urban gardens," Wong said.

Starter kits

In the Philippines, the Department of Agriculture has allocated 400 million pesos ($8.26 million) to promote urban gardening. Agriculture Secretary William Dar said, "This is part of our household food security arsenal."

The department is distributing starter kits to households and local governments to encourage them to grow vegetables.

Each kit contains a packet of assorted vegetable seeds, an instruction brochure and sample designs for pocket, container and community gardens.

Meanwhile, the Singapore Food Agency is leasing out the rooftops of public buildings for vegetables and other food crops to be grown. This program is in line with the city-state's "30 by 30" goal, which aims to produce 30 percent of its food locally by 2030.

Food and agriculture industry experts said the rise of urban gardening and buying directly from organic farmers are part of the farm-to-table social movement, which has gained traction in the region in recent years.

The movement became popular in the early 2000s, when advocates of sustainable agriculture promoted seasonal produce sourced directly from farms. This provides small farmers with more income, as they do not have to rely on middlemen for sales. Consumers are also assured of quality and safety, as they can trace the source of their food.

Advocates of the farm-to-table movement also promote the welfare of small farmers, the importance of an ecologically sound farming system, and the cultivation of heirloom cropsŚQćfruit, flower or vegetable varieties commonly grown before World War II, but which are not used in large-scale modern agriculture.

In Southeast Asia, the rapid rise of the regional economy has failed to boost the agriculture sector. From 2000 to 2015, the region recorded annual GDP growth of more than 5 percent.

However, during this period, the agriculture sector grew by only 3 percent, according to the International Food Policy Research Institute.

This has affected the livelihoods of some 100 million small farmers in the region, inspiring growth of the farm-to-table movement, according to the policy think tank Heinrich Boll Stiftung, which is based in Berlin.

"Decreasing rice prices and extreme climate-related events such as typhoons, floods or droughts shifted rural households into widespread poverty, and organic farming was introduced as one means of relief. It can offer an alternative livelihood strategy for farmers in rural or urban areas and provide mitigation for climate change-related impact," the think tank said.

Asked about their commitment to the farm-to-table movement, restaurateurs stressed the welfare of small farmers and the environment.

Malaysian chef Darren Teoh, who owns the fine-dining restaurant Dewakan in Kuala Lumpur, the country's capital, said the principles of the movement are aimed at promoting sustainable agriculture.

Teoh is an advocate of such agriculture, which involves not only buying organically grown produce, but offering fair prices to farmers and championing indigenous crops.

Dewakan is known for its dishes made from indigenous and long-forgotten ingredients in Malaysia, including buah kulim, a fruit only found in the country's rainforests, and bunga kantan, the torch ginger flower.

"We form connections with people who have similar values and principles, and see if this translates to the work they do in the field," Teoh said, adding that about 90 percent of the ingredients used at Dewakan are bought directly from Malaysian farmers and indigenous groups.

Helga Angelina Tjahjadi, co-founder of Burgreens, a vegetarian restaurant and caterer in Jakarta, the Indonesian capital, aims to serve food that is good for diners, the soil and farmers.

"When we talk about sustainability, there are three qualities that our company values. First, it has to be plant-based, because plants use fewer resources and have fewer greenhouse gas emissions. Second, we use mostly local ingredients. Third, we also make sure that farmers are getting a fair income," she said.

Wong, of Padang & Co, said the expanding middle class in Southeast Asia is keen on issues such as food safety and environmental protection.

As people become more affluent, they are increasingly concerned about their food consumption from a number of perspectives, such as health, the environment and social impact, he said.

"In Southeast Asia, many people are aware of the vulnerabilities of small farmers and are generally empathetic toward them."

Wong said the affordability of smartphones and the increased access to mobile technology have encouraged farmers in their marketing efforts.

He also said technology startups in the region play a key role in making direct-from-farm purchases easierŚQćfrom sourcing produce and packing it in warehouses, to cross-regional transportation and delivery to urban consumers.

New generation

With lockdowns prompting more customers to go online and buy directly from farmers, a new generation of tech-savvy agriculturists is turning to social media and e-commerce sites to promote and sell produce.

For example, in Thailand, fruit farmers who traditionally sell their produce to wholesalers have started to market it directly to consumers by using Facebook and the messaging app LINE, according to a report by Thai Enquirer, an online news site.

In Malaysia and Indonesia, farmers and fishermen are using e-commerce sites to sell their produce, as lockdowns have affected their sales, according to a BBC report.

Wong said direct-from-farm purchases were more the result of a logistical problem, rather than consumer desire to buy straight from farms. While these logistical bottlenecks have now been resolved, he believes consumers will continue to use online marketplaces to buy from farmers.

"I think the new normal for food purchases will follow the trend of new retail. People will prefer to buy things the way they want and where they want. This means that while traditional food supply chains won't be disrupted completely, the direct farm-to-consumer model is here to stay and will take a significant market share," he said.

Wong hopes more farmers will embrace digitalization as a "strong pathway to better rural livelihoods", but he said this will require support from elsewhere, including governments, agribusiness companies and research institutions.

"Multi-stakeholder interventions can effectively engage and educate farmers, and also develop infrastructure and sustainable business models to create lasting change," he said.

Teoh, from Dewakan, said consumers' lifestyles will determine if the direct farm-to-consumer model remains relevant after the pandemic.

He is unsure if consumers who have bought produce online during lockdowns will continue to do so when they return to work, as they spend a lot of time commuting. However, he believes that lockdowns give more people the chance to learn about sustainable agriculture.

Tjahjadi, from Burgreens, said the pandemic could lead to a gradual behavioral change among Indonesians, adding that even before the outbreak, a growing number of people had started to care about where their food comes from.

"There's a healthy food trend in Indonesia," she said, adding that this has been heightened during lockdown.

Tjahjadi said some residents in Jakarta have started urban gardens, as they are spending more time at home. She expects people to continue cultivating their gardens after the pandemic, as this lifestyle has emerged during months of lockdown.

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2020-11-06 07:26:09
<![CDATA[Wellington boys stage Chinese lion dance at school]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/05/content_1486044.htm

A group of students from a boys' school in Wellington performed a lion dance at their annual school art festival. The lion dance was jointly designed by the China Cultural Center and the school. This is the first time that the boys had performed the dance in front of the whole school, Wellington, New Zealand, Oct 29, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/Provided to Chinaculture.org]


A group of students from a boys' school in Wellington performed a lion dance at their annual school art festival. The lion dance was jointly designed by the China Cultural Center and the school. This is the first time that the boys had performed the dance in front of the whole school, Wellington, New Zealand, Oct 29, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/Provided to Chinaculture.org]


A group of students from a boys' school in Wellington performed a lion dance at their annual school art festival. The lion dance was jointly designed by the China Cultural Center and the school. This is the first time that the boys had performed the dance in front of the whole school, Wellington, New Zealand, Oct 29, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/Provided to Chinaculture.org]


A group of students from a boys' school in Wellington performed a lion dance at their annual school art festival. The lion dance was jointly designed by the China Cultural Center and the school. This is the first time that the boys had performed the dance in front of the whole school, Wellington, New Zealand, Oct 29, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/Provided to Chinaculture.org]


A group of students from a boys' school in Wellington performed a lion dance at their annual school art festival. The lion dance was jointly designed by the China Cultural Center and the school. This is the first time that the boys had performed the dance in front of the whole school, Wellington, New Zealand, Oct 29, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/Provided to Chinaculture.org]


A group of students from a boys' school in Wellington performed a lion dance at their annual school art festival. The lion dance was jointly designed by the China Cultural Center and the school. This is the first time that the boys had performed the dance in front of the whole school, Wellington, New Zealand, Oct 29, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/Provided to Chinaculture.org]


A group of students from a boys' school in Wellington performed a lion dance at their annual school art festival. The lion dance was jointly designed by the China Cultural Center and the school. This is the first time that the boys had performed the dance in front of the whole school, Wellington, New Zealand, Oct 29, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/Provided to Chinaculture.org]


A group of students from a boys' school in Wellington performed a lion dance at their annual school art festival. The lion dance was jointly designed by the China Cultural Center and the school. This is the first time that the boys had performed the dance in front of the whole school, Wellington, New Zealand, Oct 29, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/Provided to Chinaculture.org]


A group of students from a boys' school in Wellington performed a lion dance at their annual school art festival. The lion dance was jointly designed by the China Cultural Center and the school. This is the first time that the boys had performed the dance in front of the whole school, Wellington, New Zealand, Oct 29, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/Provided to Chinaculture.org]


A group of students from a boys' school in Wellington performed a lion dance at their annual school art festival. The lion dance was jointly designed by the China Cultural Center and the school. This is the first time that the boys had performed the dance in front of the whole school, Wellington, New Zealand, Oct 29, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/Provided to Chinaculture.org]


A group of students from a boys' school in Wellington performed a lion dance at their annual school art festival. The lion dance was jointly designed by the China Cultural Center and the school. This is the first time that the boys had performed the dance in front of the whole school, Wellington, New Zealand, Oct 29, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/Provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-11-05 16:27:20
<![CDATA[Chinese tourism office joins Tourism Expo Japan 2020]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/04/content_1485991.htm

The China Tourism Office in Osaka participates in Tourism Expo Japan 2020, Oct 29- Nov 1, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The China Tourism Office in Osaka participated in Tourism Expo Japan 2020, which was held at Okinawa-ken from Oct 29 to Nov 1.

This is the largest fair held offline since the outbreak of COVID-19 in Japan. The event attracted 285 enterprises from 30 countries, a number smaller than previous years due to the pandemic.

The office prepared masks printed with Chinese tourism logos for visitors, and sterilized all the brochures.


The China Tourism Office in Osaka participates in Tourism Expo Japan 2020, Oct 29- Nov 1, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Tourism Office in Osaka participates in Tourism Expo Japan 2020, Oct 29- Nov 1, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Tourism Office in Osaka participates in Tourism Expo Japan 2020, Oct 29- Nov 1, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Tourism Office in Osaka participates in Tourism Expo Japan 2020, Oct 29- Nov 1, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-11-04 13:29:06
<![CDATA[Chinese fried dumplings sizzle at Wellington Food Show]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/04/content_1485984.htm

The China Cultural Center in Wellington joins the Wellington Food Show and provides Chinese fried dumplings to the visitors with The Dumpling Company, Oct 30-Nov 1, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]

Blueberry jam from Hawke's Bay, hand-made sausages from Auckland, fresh coffee from New Plymouth and delicacies from all parts of New Zealand were shown at the Wellington Food Show on Oct 30 to Nov 1.

More than 200 food companies attended this largest food fair in the country, attracting 20,000 visitors within three days.


The China Cultural Center in Wellington joins the Wellington Food Show and provides Chinese fried dumplings to the visitors with The Dumpling Company, Oct 30-Nov 1, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]

And it was the first time that the China Cultural Center in Wellington participated in the event. The center and The Dumpling Company offered visitors five flavorings: pork and chives, chicken and mushroom, beef and carrot and pure vegetables.

The first 100 dumplings were immediately snapped by visitors waiting in a long line.


The China Cultural Center in Wellington joins the Wellington Food Show and provides Chinese fried dumplings to the visitors with The Dumpling Company, Oct 30-Nov 1, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]

After tasting this Chinese traditional cuisine, many visitors enquired about the recipe and some directly bought frozen ones to cook at home.

Guo Zongguang, the center director, said food concerns every one and every family, which let it become the most direct and convenient way for people from different cultures to communicate and know each other.


The China Cultural Center in Wellington joins the Wellington Food Show and provides Chinese fried dumplings to the visitors with The Dumpling Company, Oct 30-Nov 1, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington joins the Wellington Food Show and provides Chinese fried dumplings to the visitors with The Dumpling Company, Oct 30-Nov 1, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington joins the Wellington Food Show and provides Chinese fried dumplings to the visitors with The Dumpling Company, Oct 30-Nov 1, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington joins the Wellington Food Show and provides Chinese fried dumplings to the visitors with The Dumpling Company, Oct 30-Nov 1, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington joins the Wellington Food Show and provides Chinese fried dumplings to the visitors with The Dumpling Company, Oct 30-Nov 1, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington joins the Wellington Food Show and provides Chinese fried dumplings to the visitors with The Dumpling Company, Oct 30-Nov 1, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington joins the Wellington Food Show and provides Chinese fried dumplings to the visitors with The Dumpling Company, Oct 30-Nov 1, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington joins the Wellington Food Show and provides Chinese fried dumplings to the visitors with The Dumpling Company, Oct 30-Nov 1, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington joins the Wellington Food Show and provides Chinese fried dumplings to the visitors with The Dumpling Company, Oct 30-Nov 1, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington joins the Wellington Food Show and provides Chinese fried dumplings to the visitors with The Dumpling Company, Oct 30-Nov 1, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington joins the Wellington Food Show and provides Chinese fried dumplings to the visitors with The Dumpling Company, Oct 30-Nov 1, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington joins the Wellington Food Show and provides Chinese fried dumplings to the visitors with The Dumpling Company, Oct 30-Nov 1, 2020. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]

 

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2020-11-04 13:44:34
<![CDATA[China to enhance protection of grotto temples]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/05/content_1486014.htm

The Kizil GrottoesŚQĆa UNESCO World Heritage site in Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, began free entry for the public since last month.[Photo/Xinhua]

China's State Council has issued a set of guidelines to improve the protection and make better use of the country's grotto temples.

Protection shall always come first, said the guidelines, stressing the importance of using science and technology, as well as high-quality and professional personnel in research and cultural relics restoration in grotto protection.

The guidelines underscored the need to set up a long-term mechanism for the security of the grotto temples and enhance the use of digital technology for conservation and utilization.

Efforts should also go into better displaying the beauty of grotto temples and regulate tourism activities in grotto temples, according to the guidelines.

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2020-11-05 11:15:48
<![CDATA[Hainan opens further to foreign investors]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/05/content_1486008.htm

About 10,000 letters of interpretations on local preferential individual income tax policies have been delivered to high-level professionals in Hainan Free Trade Port. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Construction of the Hainan Free Trade Port is gaining momentum, with more policies introduced to further facilitate investment and spur quality growth, according to government officials and experts.

New policies allowing foreign investors to have wider access in a number of key areas at the Hainan Free Trade Port are in the pipeline, central authorities said.

The upcoming measures are part of China's drive to build Hainan into a free trade port and attract more foreign investment, said Meng Wei, a spokeswoman for the National Development and Reform Commission.

A master plan for the construction of the Hainan Free Trade Port was released by Chinese authorities on June 1. It aims to build the southern island into a globally influential high-level free trade port that embodies Chinese characteristics by the middle of this century. The tropical island, dubbed "China's Hawaii" or the "Hawaii of the East", covers about 34,000 square kilometers.

The master plan, together with a number of other plans issued in the past five months by ministries under the State Council and the Hainan provincial government, provide incentive policies and attractive options such as a zero-tariff policy for the trade of goods, a low income tax rate for individuals and preferential taxation policies for corporations.

The new moves are expected to facilitate the flow of capital and business on the island. These are also expected to help with the development of tourism, modern services and high-tech industries, including fields such as tropical agriculture, aerospace, medical and healthcare and marine economy, experts said.

Hainan's opening-up is attracting investment from overseas. Actual use of foreign capital in the island province hit $387 million in the first eight months of this year, surging 33 percent year-on-year. Over 400 foreign companies established offices in the province, an increase of 86.7 percent year-on-year.

On the list of the new overseas business entities in Hainan were some of the world's top 500 multinational companies such as Britain's Rio Tinto Group, French energy giant EDF and Thailand's Charoen Pokphand Group.

More than 40 central State-owned enterprises and their subsidiaries have launched regional headquarters and business units across the island with 47 billion yuan ($6.72 billion) of registered capital. Over 100 SOEs are expected to enter the Hainan FTP in about three years, according to the provincial government.

Following the government policy that expanded the annual individual tax-free shopping quota from 30,000 yuan ($4,500) to 100,000 yuan on July 1, the island has seen a steady influx of tourists and a surge in consumption. Data from Haikou Customs showed Hainan recorded duty-free sales of 10.85 billion yuan between July 1 and October 19, up 218 percent on a yearly basis.

In the past two years, the Hainan provincial government has worked to upgrade its business environment and lower barriers to trade and investment. Officials hope to build the island into a high-quality free trade port.

Last week, the government of Hainan moved one step further by unveiling guidelines that highlight institutional innovation.

The guidelines listed 18 action plans with a total of 60 missions that involve promoting institutional innovation, streamlining administrative procedures, facilitating free trade and investment and the free flow of capital and talent, building an efficient logistics system and protecting data security.

Officials said the plans will help the island become a free trade port with an efficient legal system, an internationally competitive tax system and first-class business environment. Its social governance will attract more companies and investors while helping to boost industrial competitiveness and the development quality of the island.

The free trade port will adopt a negative list for the management of imported products, according to the guideline. Experts said that with more favorable policies being drafted and implemented, Hainan is expected to be the next frontier of China's opening-up.

During a recent visit to Hainan, representatives of more than 70 key European enterprises were impressed by the Hainan FTP's policies and said there is great potential for cooperation.

Jorg Wuttke, chairman of the European Union Chamber of Commerce in China, said that Hainan's policies are very attractive.

"Hainan faces an unprecedented development opportunity and it needs to further improve its infrastructure and governance to attract more talents to do business," said Kuang Xianming, a director with the China Institute for Reform and Development. 

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2020-11-05 10:11:19
<![CDATA[Shanghai exhibition hails peace, cooperation and mutual learning]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/05/content_1486009.htm

A painting by Feng Yuan on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]

In celebration of the third China International Import Expo, which opened Wednesday and ends Tuesday in Shanghai, the China Artists Association is presenting an exhibition showing more than 200 works by artists from China and countries participating in the Belt and Road Initiative.

The ongoing exhibition, Our Home, which runs through March 31, 2021, aims to boost cultural exchanges between China and the world, and address current issues common to the human society and anticipates the future.

Artworks on show are from several sources, including selected pieces that were shown at the Beijing International Art Biennale, an event launched in 2002, and are now in the collection of the China Artists Association.


A painting by Jin Shangyi on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A painting by Tang Yongli on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A painting by Zhou Jingxin on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Sculptures by Wu Weishan on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


An ink painting by Ma Shulin on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-11-05 10:11:08
<![CDATA[Children's book fair on schedule]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/03/content_1485933.htm

Since 2013, the Shanghai International Children's Book Fair has grown into the largest showcase of books for young readers in the Asia-Pacific region. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The 2020 China Shanghai International Children's Book Fair will take place at the Shanghai World Expo Exhibition and Convention Center between Nov 13 and 15. Since 2013, the annual event has grown to become the largest showcase of books for young readers in the Asia-Pacific region.

As the second large-scale book event in the city this year, following the Shanghai Book Fair in August, the children's book fair will adopt a new exhibition model combining online and offline activities. It is an international book fair in which many overseas publishers participate, Xu Jiong, head of the municipal administration for press and publication, said at a news conference on Oct 27.

"Face-to-face communication on copyrights and other commercial opportunities have been a vital part of the fair," Xu says.

The main target has been to involve more international exhibitors and improve the fair to help it grow into one of the most important showcases of children's books globally, he adds.

However, the COVID-19 pandemic has forced majority of the book fairs all over the world to move online, postpone or cancel this year.

Xu says China has contained the pandemic, and social life and economic operations have largely returned to normal.

"In Shanghai, for example, a series of large-scale exhibitions have taken place in the past few months, so we decided to present the children's book fair as planned," he says.

Still many overseas exhibitors and guests will not be able to attend the fair personally. But their books will be displayed at the venue.

"We will coordinate with these absent participants through a series of online events," says Xu, adding that he believes the combination of on-site exhibition and online communication, as a business model, will be the new normal in the post-pandemic era.

By presenting events online, the fair will be able to reach more people and increase its influence and coverage. There used to be overseas exhibitors, especially small publishers and institutions working with less-used language, who could not attend the book fair because of distance and cost issues, he adds.

"The online book fair can largely solve such problems."

More than 350 publishers and cultural institutions from 21 countries and regions, including Russia, Italy and the United States, will take part in this year's fair, accounting for more than 30 percent of all exhibitors, Xu says.

The fair will take up a total exhibition space of 25,000 square meters. It's divided into two sections: the copyrights and trading zone will open exclusively for professional visitors, while the public and service zone will be open to all.

A special exhibition, titled Children Plus Toddlers' Books, will be held during the fair, in partnership with the Bologna Children's Book Fair, displaying around 140 books from different countries for childrenŚQćfrom infants up to age 3.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of Italian writer Gianni Rodari, whose The Tale of the Little Onion has enjoyed wide popularity with Chinese readers for decades. An art exhibition, Italian Excellence: Illustrators for Gianni Rodari, will be presented at the fair, too.

Authors, publishers, illustrators and specialists working in the field of children's entertainment and education, such as the 2020 Greenaway Medal winner Shaun Tan from Australia, 2020 Hans Christian Andersen Award winner for illustration Albertine from Switzerland and Chinese writer Cao Wenxuan, will share their insights at seminars.

A number of competitions will take place, with awards announced during the fair, such as the Golden Pinwheel Young Illustrators Competition and the Chen Bochui International Children's Literature Award.

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2020-11-03 11:03:57
<![CDATA[Composition competition composes global tune]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/04/content_1485952.htm

Suzhou Symphony Orchestra [Photo provided to China Daily]

2021 Jinji Lake International Composition Competition has been launched by Suzhou Symphony Orchestra. The top winner will be awarded 100,000 yuan and the final round of competition will be held on June 19, 2021, at Jinji Lake Concert Hall in Suzhou of Jiangsu province, home to the Suzhou Symphony Orchestra.

Ten to 15 new music pieces will be commissioned to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Chinese Communist Party next year.

Veteran composer and professor of Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Xu Mengdong, will serve as the chairman of the judging panel of the competition.

Founded in 2016, the Suzhou Symphony Orchestra comprises more than 70 musicians with an average age of 30, who hail from China and 18 other countries and regions including Japan, South Korea and the United States.

First held in 2018, the competition invites composers from around the world to write music inspired by the city of Suzhou. According to Xu, the competition in 2018 saw more than 140 music works from over 90 composers from around the world, which made the competition an international event.


Chen Guangxian, head of Suzhou Symphony Orchestra [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-11-04 10:50:33
<![CDATA[NW China province steps up efforts to protect Great Wall]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/04/content_1485953.htm

Jiayuguan Pass, located 6 km southwest of Jiayuguan in Gansu, makes up the Great Wall's western end, which stretches to the eastern end at Shanhaiguan Pass on the shores of North China's Bohai Bay.[Photo/Xinhua]

Northwest China's Gansu province will initiate a conservation plan for the Great Wall, according to the Gansu Provincial Administration of Cultural Heritage.

"The conservation plan has been worked out and preparations for a national park management system to protect the Great Wall sections in Gansu are underway," Ma Yuping, director of the administration, said Sunday.

The Gansu section of the Great Wall measures 3,654 km, ranking second in the country in length, with resources of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) Great Wall ranking first in the country.

Jiayuguan Pass, located 6 km southwest of Jiayuguan in Gansu, makes up the Great Wall's western end, which stretches to the eastern end at Shanhaiguan Pass on the shores of North China's Bohai Bay.

Gansu has invested a total of 600 million yuan ($89.76 million) on more than 30 Great Wall protection projects in recent years, according to the administration.

The projects involve emergency rescue and reinforcement of the Great Wall itself as well as maintenance and repair of flood control and drainage facilities around the relic sites.

The repair and protection work of Jiayuguan Pass is the largest among the projects, Ma added.

Construction on Jiayuguan Pass began in 1372 and was completed in 1540. It was listed as a World Cultural Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1987.

The Gansu section of the Great Wall for the planned national park is expected to include three exhibition gardens to display the ramming technology in the construction of the Great Wall in Northwest China, the history of the ancient Silk Road, and the culture of the Great Wall.

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2020-11-04 10:50:11
<![CDATA[Glories of a hidden world]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/04/content_1485940.htm

The photos of sea creatures that he has taken over the years. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Deep-sea photographer captures the wonder of life beneath the waves, Wang Qian reports.

Night's dark curtain descends. As it falls, it hides a huge underwater movement. It is called the diurnal vertical migration. Simply put, this is the biggest biomass movement on the planet. Marine organisms move up to the surface of the sea after dusk and return to the deep water before dawn.

The vigorous but hidden world has been the focus of underwater photographer Zhang Fan's camera lens for the past 10 years.


Photographer Zhang Fan descends during a dive in Brunei last year. [Photo provided to China Daily]

To be specific, he is a blackwater photographer. This is done in the open ocean. But to clear up any misunderstanding, it is not just diving into water at night. Blackwater diving is done where there is seemingly no bottom, in very deep water, using a downline and lights to attract sealife. The photographer is often looking for the unusual marine wildlife that's rarely, if ever, seen.

"The experience is amazing. Diving into the depths of the ocean makes me feel like I'm floating in infinite space with luminous marine creatures shining like stars," says Zhang, 35.

From the blue whale, the world's biggest mammal, and the rarely-seen blanket octopus to alien-like planktonic critters, the oceans are home to limitless life forms for Zhang to explore and record. He has been underwater in more than 30 countries and regions.


The photos of sea creatures that he has taken over the years. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Still relatively new in China, blackwater diving dates back to the early 1980s in Hawaii, the United States. Usually, blackwater photography involves hanging powerful light "baits" about every five meters down from a buoy, letting it drift in deep waters and waiting for the light to attract small marine creatures up from the depths to be photographed.

"It is a world full of surprises in which you never know what you will encounter," Zhang says.

With a true passion for the oceans, Zhang started blackwater photography in 2010 and hopes that one day he can publish a book as a field guide to life in the deep blue based on his images and descriptions.

"I have always been thinking about how to establish a database of different categories and how to make my text and images into an interesting book to help the public better understand the blue planet," Zhang says.


[Photo provided to China Daily]

Acknowledged as a pioneer blackwater photographer in China, he has more than 430,000 followers of his account on micro-blogging service Sina Weibo. He also opened accounts on short-video sharing platforms Bilibili and Douyin.

"Through my lens, I hope to raise awareness on marine conservation and protection and that more people can enjoy the beauty of the ocean," Zhang says.

A follower, called Yunlan, comments that Zhang presents impressive photos and information about marine life and shares his observations on the relationship between humans and the ocean.

Zhang is a regular contributor to Chinese National Geography magazine and a contracted photographer to the UNESCO Man and the Biosphere Program. He has published several books and was invited to photograph the endangered Yangtze finless porpoise by the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2013.

Shan Zhiqiang, editor-in-chief of Chinese National Geography, is often impressed by his unique photos. "Zhang is good at capturing the beauty of our oceans in the inkyblack waters," Shan writes on his Sina Weibo account.


The photos of sea creatures that he has taken over the years. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Breakthrough

Zhang spent his childhood in the south, in Haikou on the island province of Hainan and developed a fascination for the ocean at a young age. Most days were spent in and around the water. At the age of 6, he drew a picture of a boat and two divers ready to photograph nearly 50 marine creatures in the water. He knew then what he wanted to be.

"The ones marked with stars are the marine varieties that I wished to encounter when I was a boy and I have since recorded all of them with my camera," Zhang says and smiles. A graduate from the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing with a bachelor's degree in illustration, Zhang took various odd jobs, such as that of a video game concept designer or a 3D artist, before earning a living as a photographer.

Zhang's secondhand Olympus Stylus 1060 camera cost less than 1,000 yuan ($149).

His breakthrough came when a friend invited him to dive in waters surrounding the Xisha Islands in Hainan. Although the trip was expensive, Zhang agreed and borrowed money to buy equipment specifically for underwater use, including a Canon G12 and an Inon underwater strobe. It came to nearly 10,000 yuan.

However, with everything ready, the trip was canceled due to bad weather. The bad luck didn't stop Zhang, who used the opportunity to learn scuba diving in Sanya, Hainan, during which time he was able to take a photo of his first deep-sea creatureŚQća mole cowry.


Photographer Zhang Fan is fully equipped before a blackwater night dive in Anilao, the Philippines, last year. [Photo provided to China Daily]

For Zhang, who has ankylosing spondylitis, a form of spinal arthritis, underwater photography that requires him to work in cold water is not an ideal career. But dreams sometimes require sacrifice.

"In the first few years as an underwater photographer, I had to borrow money from my parents to make ends meet," he says. After his images established his reputation, companies contacted him offering work.

He also gives lectures on ocean biology and sometimes arranges diving tours for people.

Located in the nutrient-rich Coral Triangle, Anilao in the Philippines, home to an astounding amount of marine wildlife, has been one of his most frequently-visited destinations. November is the best time for underwater photography in Anilao, according to Zhang.

Late last year, he recorded an eel larva during a nighttime dive off the coast there. "Leptocephalus is not easy to capture, because it moves super fast and randomly," he says.

During another dive in Anilao, Zhang encountered a blanket octopus, unfolding and displaying a colorful web.


The photos of sea creatures that he has taken over the years. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Exploring the unknown

It may seem glamorous, going to exotic destinations, but there is often some element of danger involved, not least the risk of the bends, or decompression sickness, as well as attacks from aggressive marine animals.

"I have encountered many dangerous moments underwater, including being hit by a sperm whale, experiencing a volcanic eruption and the use of dynamite by fishing boats," Zhang says.

However, he knows that marine animals are much more tolerant to humans than humans are to them.

He has experienced the surprise of meeting a fish at the same diving spot days or months apart. "Some fish have a fixed reef as their home," he explains.


The photos of sea creatures that he has taken over the years. [Photo provided to China Daily]

"It is like meeting an old neighbor," he recalls, speaking of the touching moment that is indescribably wonderful when he returns after a gap of a few days or even a couple months to see the fish he previously photographed still there.

Having documented the underwater world for the past decade, Zhang has seen how climate change and human behavior have influenced the ocean.

"Corals are among the first indicators of climate change. With the rise in temperature, corals have undergone a process called 'bleaching', during which they lose their color and are dying. It is heartbreaking."

Besides global warming, he adds that overfishing and plastic pollution are also challenges faced by the ocean ecosystem. "Our planet is changing and the beautiful things that I love are dying. I hope that my photos and videos can act as a wake-up call to protect our oceans," Zhang says.

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2020-11-04 08:26:17
<![CDATA[Chinese and Italian artists conduct dialogue in live show]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/03/content_1485939.htm

What will happen when Chinese Peking Opera meets Italian opera? A live show featuring dialogue between Chinese and Italian artists will be staged at 7:30 pm on Friday (GMT+8), with piano, violin, chorus, opera and ballet performances.

The online show celebrates the 50th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between Italy and China. Against the background of the global fight against COVID-19, the show presents the theme of "bright future" and expresses best wishes for the two countries.

You can watch the event on China Culture's Facebook and YouTube pages.

https://www.facebook.com/chinacultureorg/

https://www.youtube.com/chinacultureorg

 

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2020-11-03 16:20:34
<![CDATA[Exhibition in Qingdao honors immortality]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/03/content_1485936.htm

Works by 10 members of the French Academy of Fine Arts are on show at Homage to Immortality, an exhibition to open the Rongyuan Art Museum in Qingdao. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Dozens of paintings, sculptures, installations and photos by 10 members of the French Academy of Fine Arts are on show at Homage to Immortality, an exhibition to inaugurate the Rongyuan Art Museum in Qingdao, Shandong province.

The exhibition through Nov 30 reflects artists' explorations with the relationships between content and form, and figurative and abstract approaches. And it shows the similarities and differences between the East and West in the interaction between human and nature.


Works by 10 members of the French Academy of Fine Arts are on show at Homage to Immortality, an exhibition to open the Rongyuan Art Museum in Qingdao. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Works by 10 members of the French Academy of Fine Arts are on show at Homage to Immortality, an exhibition to open the Rongyuan Art Museum in Qingdao. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Works by 10 members of the French Academy of Fine Arts are on show at Homage to Immortality, an exhibition to open the Rongyuan Art Museum in Qingdao. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Works by 10 members of the French Academy of Fine Arts are on show at Homage to Immortality, an exhibition to open the Rongyuan Art Museum in Qingdao. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Works by 10 members of the French Academy of Fine Arts are on show at Homage to Immortality, an exhibition to open the Rongyuan Art Museum in Qingdao. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Works by 10 members of the French Academy of Fine Arts are on show at Homage to Immortality, an exhibition to open the Rongyuan Art Museum in Qingdao. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-11-03 13:26:59
<![CDATA[Age-old Lijin brocade takes center stage]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/02/content_1485871.htm

A model presents creations from Eve Group during a show featuring Lijin and Miao embroidery in Beijing on Friday as part of the 2020 China Fashion Week. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

A fashion show featuring Lijin, a type of brocade originating from the Li ethnic group in China's Hainan province, and Miao embroidery of the Miao ethnic group in Guizhou province, was held in Beijing on Friday night as part of the 2020 China Fashion Week.

Designers from Beijing-based Eve Group used patterns from costumes of the Li and Miao ethic groups, dyeing techniques of Lijin, and embroidering skills from Miao people to create a modern style.


A model presents creations from Eve Group during a show featuring Lijin and Miao embroidery in Beijing on Friday as part of the 2020 China Fashion Week.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Lijin, which has a history of more than 3,000 years, has been listed on UNESCO's "Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding". The Miao embroidery craft has been passed down for generations among the Miao people.

The show also invited a special group as its models: women from the two ethnic groups who create the patterns or master the skills of dyeing or embroidering used in clothes displayed on the stage. They come from villages in rural places in Hainan and Guizhou province. Aged 40 to 74, these women earn a living by using their traditional skills obtained from their families.

Xiao Hua, who initiated the show and brought these special models to the stage, said she wants more people to know the beautiful traditional costumes of the ethnic groups through fashion shows.


A model presents creations from Eve Group during a show featuring Lijin and Miao embroidery in Beijing on Friday as part of the 2020 China Fashion Week.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Models present creations from Eve Group during a show featuring Lijin and Miao embroidery in Beijing on Friday as part of the 2020 China Fashion Week. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-11-02 09:48:40
<![CDATA[Caps on number of visitors to be implemented at grotto temple sites]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-11/02/content_1485866.htm

UNESCO World Heritage site Yungang Grottoes in Shanxi province is an outstanding example of Chinese grotto temples. [PHOTO BY WANG KAIHAO/CHINA DAILY]

The National Cultural Heritage Administration and Ministry of Culture and Tourism jointly released an announcement last week demanding administrations of all ancient grotto temple sites across the country to set caps on the number of daily visits to ensure longevity of such cultural heritage and the safety of tourists.

Grotto temples, which were carved into mountains or rocks for religious purposes, were introduced into China from India and Central Asia in the 3rd century, and became a pillar of Chinese Buddhist art throughout ancient Chinese history.

Mogao Caves in Dunhuang, Gansu province, Longmen Grottoes in Luoyang, Henan province, Yungang Grottoes in Datong, Shanxi province, and a series of Buddhist grottoes along the ancient Silk Road, have been inscribed onto the list of UNESCO World Heritage sites.

In May, President Xi Jinping visited Yungang and called for protection of grotto temples to be given priority over tourism development. He also urged better display of their cultural legacies.

Nevertheless, the new announcement points out that the boom in the number of tourists during peak seasons and holidays "overwhelmed" some of the grotto sites.

Over 265,000 people poured into Longmen Grottoes during the eight-day National Day holiday in October, a 2.3 percent increase compared with last year, despite the effect of COVID-19.

The announcement sets out a requirement for all administrations of the country's grotto temples to map their own capping plans by the end of this year, which should be based on closer supervision and balanced distribution of visits at different hours. Their evaluations of the new policies need to be handed to the National Cultural Heritage Administration by Jan 31, 2021.

It also calls for the administrations of grotto sites to avoid "excessive entertainment and business development" in areas surrounding the cultural treasures.

Caps on the number of daily visits have already been set in some of the grottoes.

For example, Mogao Caves adopted the policy in 2014. All visitors to the site have to be organized in guided tours, and while up to 18,000 people are allowed in the site, 12,000 of them can only visit four designated caves that offer enough space.

In Yungang, 7,500 visitors are allowed in every morning and afternoon, respectively. And the daily cap for Kizil Grottoes in the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, the longest surviving grotto temple site in China, is 1,000 people.

Based on further scientific analysis of data, tailored maximum capacities are to be set for key spots on visiting routes and inside grottoes, as demanded in the announcement, so are timely alert systems and facilities to handle emergencies.

The National Cultural Heritage Administration and Ministry of Culture and Tourism will launch an inspection of the work in the first half of 2021.

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2020-11-02 07:56:40
<![CDATA[Too busy to be tired, too tired to be busy]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-10/31/content_1485852.htm

Lang Luwen/For China Daily

In the 1970s the Western world gorged itself on fad diets, from Atkins to Scars-dale, and the millions of books about them that were sold helped keep the publishing industry in good shape. About the same time, punk rock music made its world debut.

Turn the clock forward half a century, and dieting and punk have been sewn seamlessly togetherŚQćin China of all placesŚQćto give us pengke yangsheng, the punk diet.

Of course, the thing about fad diets is that often what they most have going for them is a catchy name, and that may well apply to the punk diet. In fact strictly speaking the name seems to describe a lifestyleŚQćan attitude evenŚQćrather than a food regime, even if it does relate to what one consumes. Also, as with many new fangled phenomena like this in China, its genesis, or at least the name, seems to have been conceived in cyberspace.

But let's take ourselves away from the internet for a moment and into the real world, and talk about how one can spot a punk dieter. Consider these three pictures: In one hand a young man holds a thermos flask cup with steam pouring out of it, and in the other he holds a glass half full of scotch on the rocks. After staying up for half the night and catching a lot fewer than forty winks a young woman sits there applying the most expensive face pack to her visage. A group of three hits the disco floor, ostensibly to keep fit, and between dances imbibes whiskey soaked in goji berries.

So unlike a conventional diet that runs a straight line emphasizing healthy eating and engaging in physical activity, the punk diet, championed by Generation Z, those born this century, bounces back and forth between extremes, its practitioners taking great delight not only in the irony but in the fact that they are leading an oh-so trendy lifestyle as well.

Unlike a conventional diet that runs a straight line emphasizing healthy eating and engaging in physical activity, the punk diet, championed by Generation Z, those born this century, bounces back and forth between extremes, its practitioners taking great delight not only in the irony but in the fact that they are leading an oh-so trendy lifestyle as well. [Photo provided to China Daily]

However, when you delve below the thin surface of all this, you find that young people do seem to have piled on themselvesŚQćor had piled on themŚQćsuch a weighty load of academic and work pressures that it is no wonder that at such an early age they have cottoned on to the idea that they had better start caring for their health, too.

Last year National Health Insight Report published by Dingxiang Doctor, a dedicated medical information app, said that of the four age groups, the post 1960s, 70s, 80s and 90s, the younger the person was, the dimmer the view they had of their personal health.

"On the one hand is fast-paced work and life generally, and on the other is anxiety about losing one's competitive edge," says Jiang Wenxiu of the Department of Psychiatry, Zhongda Hospital, Southeast University in Jiangsu province.

"Young people always seem to feel that they must do something to defend their hairline, or to resist the fine lines that climb up around the corners of their eyes."


Unlike a conventional diet that runs a straight line emphasizing healthy eating and engaging in physical activity, the punk diet, championed by Generation Z, those born this century, bounces back and forth between extremes, its practitioners taking great delight not only in the irony but in the fact that they are leading an oh-so trendy lifestyle as well. [Photo provided to China Daily]

A survey last year by the market consultancy iResearch found that among young people who stay up late at night nearly 42.6 percent usually go to sleep between 10 pm and 11 pm, and nearly 33.7 percent between 11 pm and 12 am. The rest, 23.7 percent, said they go to sleep after midnight and have long-term problems relating to irregular work and rest.

Seventy percent of the late sleepers said they could sleep seven hours a day, and nearly 8 percent said they suffered from severe sleep deprivation, with average sleep of five hours or less. In addition, a comparison of groups with different times for going to sleep found that the earlier the time, the higher the proportion of full sleep (seven hours or more), and the later the time of going to sleep, the greater the proportion of severe sleep deprivation (five hours or less).

"It has almost become routine among young office workers to binge drink coffee when they are busy at work," Jiang says. "They ponder the dark circles under their eyes, and an instant later you see them putting goji berries into the thermos flask they bought in Japan."

Jiang light-heartedly sums up the health regimen of contemporary young people: "They spend half their life skinny dipping and the other half magic potion sipping."

And healthcare companies, always with an eye to marketing opportunities, have spotted this phenomenon. Among them is Tong Ren Tang medicine store, 351 years young, in Beijing. It has created what it calls a "Chinese medicine coffee" that taps into demand and the very name of the new sounds like a health preservation.

That Tong Ren Tang should have decided to become involved in this young mark fits in well with the irony of the punk diet lifestyle, for when many people think of this company what would no doubt cross their minds would be pictures of the quaint old stores in which it plies its wares, the surroundings including carved wooden beams and paintings, old-fashioned containers full of medicine and almost invariably an ancient Chinese doctor with silver hair and white beard.

Tong Ren Tang, one of the most prestigious traditional medicine stores in China, was founded in 1669, the eighth year of the Kangxi Reign in the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), and from 1723 was dedicated to imperial medicine, serving the needs of eight emperors over 188 years.

Goji berry latte, appetizing americano, mother-wort rose latte, diuretic anti-swelling osmanthus honey bean coffee are some of the oh-so-non-traditional drinks it sells.

"We soften the goji berry, squeeze it into a pulp and add it to the coffee," says Li Shengli, barista of Tong Ren Tang Coffee Shop. "What it does is nourish the liver and kidney. For those who often stay up late it's a good idea to drink wolfberry latte."

At Tong Ren Tang Zhima Health No 1 Store in Beijing, the first floor of the store offers packaged retail products such as health soup, congee and pastry bread. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Li, a barista for many years, says that after to work for Tong Ren Tang this year, he realized that he could understand coffee from the perspective of Chinese medicine. The coffee itself that relieves pain is matched with Chinese herbs such as wolfberry, tangerine peel and cinnamon, high in potassium and antioxidants.

However, herbal coffee is just the tip of the iceberg of the company's stronger attention to young consumers. At Tong Ren Tang Zhima Health No 1 Store in Chaoyang district of Beijing, the first floor of the store also offers packaged retail products such as health soup, congee and pastry bread; on the second floor is the traditional drug store, where registration, consultation and medicine are available.

Su Xiaohang, in charge of brand promotion, says the herbal coffee is not the focus of the marketing, but it hopes to use coffee and fast-moving consumer goods to attract people to create a new environment that reflects healthy living.


On the second floor is the drug store, where registration, consultation and medicine are available. [Photo provided to China Daily]

"In the normal course of events a person feels sick, goes and sees a doctor, has their pulse taken, is given some medicine and goes home," Su was quoted as saying in a recent interview with China News Service.

"We plan to emphasize the equal importance of medicine and food and help people through diet therapy."

A recent iResearch report on health consumption trends among young people found that more than 90 percent of those born this century have a general awareness of the importance of health, more than half of them taking practical steps to do something about it for themselves.

The first step on this road to looking after one's health, of course, is to equip oneself with whatever is healthy. Someone who follows a punk diet and who is doing a lot of overtime might drench themselves in a cup of vigor-enhancing ointment to replenish vitality, chew two pieces of donkey-hide gelatin cake to take care of a bad complexion, drink a cup of instant white fungus soup to moisten bone-dry skin, or eat a few black sesame pills if strands of their hair seem to fall out at the mere touch of a finger.

Recently CBNData, Alibaba Health and Tmall Appliances jointly published a report titled New Foodism, according to which sales of traditional tonics grew more than 20 percent in 2018 and 2019, and which says that those born in the 1990s have become the main buyers of online of traditional tonics over the past three years.

"We have always considered health products as a market for the elderly, but as people's economic well-being continues to improve, the care that the young have for managing their image and looking after their physical health is conducive to the rise of young people's health products," says Guo Xin, a marketing professor at Beijing Technology and Business University.

According to the market research company Euromonitor International, China's healthcare products industry turned over 162.7 billion yuan last year, 9.8 percent more than in 2018. The domestic health care products market is reckoned to be worth 100 billion yuan, it says, and analysts say that more and more companies are getting into the market because of the rising awareness of young people of the importance of good health.

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2020-10-31 10:51:24
<![CDATA[Saturnbird brings back Project Return recycling campaign]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-10/30/content_1485845.htm

Saturnbird Coffee is starting its third recycling campaign. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Saturnbird Coffee launched its third edition of Project Return in 43 cities across China from Oct 16 to 18.

The project collaborated with 64 places, including cafes, bookstores and furniture shops, using their space to recycle Saturnbird's small empty coffee containers.

The project is scheduled twice a year, and calls on customers to bring their used containers and exchange them for free gifts, including shopping bags and headphone sleeves.

Customers can also choose to donate the containers. Saturnbird will donate money according to the quantity of the donated containers.

Saturnbird Coffee launched its third edition of Project Return in 43 cities across China from Oct 16 to 18. [Photo provided to China Daily]

So far, the three public benefit organizations have received over 10,000 containers each, and Saturnbird will donate 50,000 yuan ($7,453) to each organization to help with marine environment protection and wildlife protection.

More than 20,000 people joined the project, and over 1.4 million containers were recycled. The recycled containers will not be used as containers again, but will be made into other devices.

Saturnbird Coffee launched its third edition of Project Return in 43 cities across China from Oct 16 to 18. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-10-30 13:08:15
<![CDATA[Arxan signs deals to boost winter tourism]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-10/29/content_1485832.htm

Arxan will roll out study and self-driven tours, as well as cross-country experiences for winter vacationers. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Arxan has signed a cooperation agreement with tourism players in Beijing to boost its winter appeal.

The city in North China's Inner Mongolia autonomous region will roll out study and self-driven tours, as well as cross-country experiences for winter vacationers.

Favorable tourism policies have been made to offer travelers incentives.

Arxan abounds in tourism products and tourists can enjoy distinctive hot springs, glittering and translucent rime and castle-style towns, said Wang Tianfeng, vice-mayor of Arxan.

Arxan will roll out study and self-driven tours, as well as cross-country experiences for winter vacationers. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The city received more than 130,000 visits during the National Day holiday, about 95 percent of the visits received during last year's holiday, according to the local government.

In 2019, Arxan received 4.99 million tourist visits in 2019, up 16 percent over the previous year. Tourism income reached 6.08 billion yuan ($906.5 million), up 16 percent.

Arxan will roll out study and self-driven tours, as well as cross-country experiences for winter vacationers. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-10-29 16:20:53
<![CDATA[Brewing sustainability]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-10/30/content_1485834.htm

A consumer holding her own cup buys coffee at Manner Coffee in Shanghai.[Photo by He Qi/China Daily]

Fan Lihong, her parents and her daughter are standing along Madang Road in Shanghai, cups in hand. Many others in the line are doing the same.

From afar, such a scene might seem reminiscent of water rationing. But these individuals are simply after a caffeine fix, with sustainability in mind.

"I have been using my own cups to buy coffee this year. Using my own cup is not only convenient and cost effectiveŚQćit also helps with environmental protection," says Fan.

Another customer who was waiting in a line outside Manner Coffee, Liu Shiyun, echoes the same sentiment.

"A latte at Manner Coffee costs 15 yuan ($2.24). If I use my own cup to buy the coffee, I get 5 yuan discount and will save at least 100 yuan per month," Liu says.

"I hope more coffee shops can promote this concept as it is environmentally friendly and cost-effective."

Manner Coffee, which operates over 100 stores across China, sells nearly 100,000 cups of coffee per day. A quarter to a third of their customers bring their own cups, according to Ning Yihan, marketing representative of Manner.

"We started to encourage consumers to bring their own non-disposable cups to Manner stores since the day we were established. We hope to contribute to environmental protection with our customers," Ning says.

"It is very interesting and meaningful while you see all kinds of people bringing their own cups. There are Japanese-style izakaya store owners bringing beer mugs and security or sanitation workers with their thermoses," she adds.

For others like Ping Jing, a 26-year-old nurse who usually buys her coffee from Writer Coffee on Weihai Road, using her own mug is not just about cutting down on costs, but taste as well.

"A glass cup or mug will give you a different taste and an exclusive feel compared with using the disposable paper cup," she says.

"More people are drinking coffee today. We don't just wish to drink coffeeŚQćwe also hope this habit can be environmentally friendly."


Cups belonging to consumers are seen in a cafe in Shanghai.[Photo by He Qi/China Daily]

According to Zhang Ling, founder of Writer Coffee, nearly two-thirds of her customers bring their own cups.

"In the beginning, it was mostly foreign guests who brought their own cups because they're used to doing so. Later, more Chinese started to do the same as we have been promoting the discounts that they can enjoy if they do so," says Zhang.

Writer Coffee currently offers a 5 yuan discount to guests who consume their coffee using a mug from the cafe. It also loans cups to customers who prefer not to use the disposable option.

To date, one-fifth of Writer Coffee's customers choose to leave their cups in the store.

Zhu Yifan, 32, who works in an office located near Writer Coffee, leaves her cup in the store every day after work and picks it up in the morning before work. What motivated her to carry out this practice are the garbage-sorting measures and empty-plate movement, or anti-food-waste movement, that the government has been promoting in recent times.

According to a China Central Television survey last year, Starbucks uses 4 billion disposable cups that require 1.6 million trees to make each year. The survey also lists some fast-food chain enterprises, which sell a large number of cups of beverages.

While the survey points out that most consumers would dispose of these cups into the recyclable section of rubbish bins, a garbage-collection station in Beijing says that wet and dirty paper cups will not be recycled.

"In order to improve its anti-osmosis and strength, we paste a layer of plastic on the cups so that it became a composite paper product, and this interferes with paper recycling. The cost of separating the plastic from the paper cup is very high," Tsinghua University environment professor Liu Jianguo tells China Central Television.

"We can only try to avoid the use of such cups in the first place. If we have to use it, then we use it as many times as possible to prolong its service life."

Other countries around the world have also set their eyes on reducing the use of disposable paper cups and encourage people to use more environmentally options.

For example, Ireland's environment minister announced in November 2019 that consumers who use disposable cups will by 2021 be subjected to a "latte tax".

It was also reported that the United Kingdom uses 2.5 billion disposable paper cups a year, almost none of which are recycled. For this reason, British legislators have called for a tax on paper cups as they believe that manufacturers of these products should pay more.

The UK's House of Commons Environmental Audit Committee had also urged the government to set a goal of recycling all disposable cups by 2023, failing which an outright ban on such products should be put in place.

 

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2020-10-30 08:08:57
<![CDATA[South Korea to see cultural activities on Chinese modern art]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-10/30/content_1485835.htm

The exhibition, seminar and concert highlighting modern Chinese culture is kicking off Nov 6 in Seoul. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Art and Peace ‚Ä?the 2020 Modern Chinese Fine Arts Exhibition, Seminar and Concert in South Korea will open on Nov 6 at the Korean Artists Center in Seoul.

The event was organized by the General Federation of Korean Arts and Cultural Groups, the Korean Music Association, and supported by the Seoul Municipal Government, the China Cultural Center in Seoul, and the Shandong Provincial Department of Culture and Tourism.

From Nov 6 to 19, the exhibition will display works of 38 Shandong painters and more than 40 Korean painters, including traditional Chinese paintings, oil paintings, watercolor paintings and Korean traditional paintings.


The exhibition, seminar and concert highlighting modern Chinese culture is kicking off Nov 6 in Seoul. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

On Nov 6, scholars from East China's Shandong province and South Korea will focus on musical exchanges between the two countries, and explore the potential of musical cooperation in the future.

On the same day, artists from China and South Korea will jointly perform classic folk music of the two countries, such as House of Flying Daggers and Arirang Fantasia.


The exhibition, seminar and concert highlighting modern Chinese culture is kicking off Nov 6 in Seoul. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The China-South Korea Art Exchange Seminar, held on Nov 7, will review the history of China-South Korea art exchanges, explore ways to further expand cooperation and promote East Asian art to the world.

In view of the epidemic, relevant projects will be held both offline and online to enable more people to participate.


The exhibition, seminar and concert highlighting modern Chinese culture is kicking off Nov 6 in Seoul. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The exhibition, seminar and concert highlighting modern Chinese culture is kicking off Nov 6 in Seoul. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The exhibition, seminar and concert highlighting modern Chinese culture is kicking off Nov 6 in Seoul. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The exhibition, seminar and concert highlighting modern Chinese culture is kicking off Nov 6 in Seoul. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The exhibition, seminar and concert highlighting modern Chinese culture is kicking off Nov 6 in Seoul. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The exhibition, seminar and concert highlighting modern Chinese culture is kicking off Nov 6 in Seoul. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-10-30 08:30:00
<![CDATA[Exhibition celebrates breadth of colors and philosophy of life]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-10/29/content_1485830.htm

SALS creates an artistic and serene living atmosphere at its exhibition space at this year's Guardian Fine Art Asia expo. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The lingering charm of Chinese antiques is not only derived from the dexterity of a variety of handicrafts. The objects also reflect how their users in ancient times viewed the relationship between humans and nature, as well as how they lived a cultured and elegant life to achieve harmony with the world.

In this regard, SALS, a cultural institution in Beijing, has created an artistic and serene living atmosphere at its exhibition space at this year's Guardian Fine Art Asia Expo, running from Oct 28 to Nov 1 at Guardian Art Center in Beijing.


An incense burner designed by Xiu Zhe on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]

On show are objects of antiquity and contemporary designs inspired by the forms, color schemes and philosophies of ancient Chinese works of art.

Xiu Zhe, founder of SALS and a designer in his own right, says the works on display present the brilliance of color arrangements that distinguishes ancient Chinese arts and crafts, the beauty of which is even enhanced by the appearance of red, orange, brown and green rust accumulated over centuries.

He says the exhibition also conveys the core values of aesthetics, literature and Buddhism held dear to the ancient Chinese, which have been inherited by modern designers to connect the past and present in their works.


SALS creates an artistic and serene living atmosphere at its exhibition space at this year's Guardian Fine Art Asia expo. [Photo provided to China Daily]


A candlestick designed by Xiu Zhe on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


SALS creates an artistic and serene living atmosphere at its exhibition space at this year's Guardian Fine Art Asia expo. [Photo provided to China Daily]


An incense burner designed by Xiu Zhe on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


An incense burner designed by Xiu Zhe on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


An incense burner designed by Xiu Zhe on show. [Photo provided to China Daily]


SALS creates an artistic and serene living atmosphere at its exhibition space at this year's Guardian Fine Art Asia expo. [Photo provided to China Daily]


SALS creates an artistic and serene living atmosphere at its exhibition space at this year's Guardian Fine Art Asia expo. [Photo provided to China Daily]


SALS creates an artistic and serene living atmosphere at its exhibition space at this year's Guardian Fine Art Asia expo. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-10-29 14:28:51
<![CDATA[Images: Life at Qinghai-Tibet Plateau]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-10/29/content_1485831.htm

The construction workers brought by local government are beautifying the courtyard wall for villagers, in Gaxiuxin village, Luqu town, Gansu province, Aug 1, 2020. [Photo by Fei Maohua//cpanet.org.cn]

A recent photo exhibition in Beijing showcases lives of people dwelling at the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

Different ethnic groups on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau are starting to lead a new life due to the anti-poverty campaign. New residences with local features rise from the ground, modern towns stand tall, flat and wide roads stretch far away, farmlands full of life buzz with activity of large machinery.

Boasting high towering snow mountains, vast green grasslands and tranquil lakes, the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau attracts tourists from home and abroad.

With the advancement of China's modernization, lives of people living at the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau are also undergoing tremendous changes over the past few years.


A train passes on Lhasa River Bridge in Tibet autonomous region, Aug 19, 2014. [Photo by Yuan Ruilun/cpanet.org.cn]


A local villager collects salt in Yanjing town, Mangkang county, Tibet autonomous region, in Aug 2020. [Photo by Phurbu Tsering/cpanet.org.cn]


The Namtso Lake in Tibet autonomous region, Oct 27, 2019. [Photo by Liu Yingyi/cpanet.org.cn]


A shepherd is milking at the Ganjia Grassland, in Xiahe county, Gansu province, Aug 3, 2020. [Photo by Fei Maohua/cpanet.org.cn]


The summer scenery of Re'er Grassland in Ruoergai county, Aba Tibetan and Qiang autonomous prefecture in Sichuan province, June, 2016. [Photo by Ze Ke/cpanet.org.cn]


The scenery of Dagu glacier in Heishui county, Aba Tibetan and Qiang autonomous prefecture in Sichuan province, January 2019. [Photo by Tang Huaxiang/cpanet.org.cn]


Horse racing festival is held on a grassland in Ganzi Tibetan autonomous prefecture in Sichuan province, July 31, 2020. [Photo by Liu Jun/cpanet.org.cn]


The Dadong village at the Liuwu Street in Lhasa city of Tibet was listed into the fifth batch of traditional Chinese villages in July 29, 2020. [Photo by Kang Taisen/cpanet.org.cn]


Villagers dance at Sinong village, Deqin county, Diqing Tibetan autonomous prefecture in Yunnan province, Aug 5, 2020. [Photo by Yin Yonghong/cpanet.org.cn]


A family in Gaxiuxin village, Gannan Tibet autonomous prefecture of Gansu province, attaches great importance to cultivate children's artistic culture. [Photo by Li Fan/cpanet.org.cn]


A soccer match is underway at a local middle school in Baqing county, Tibet autonomous region, Aug 1, 2020. [Photo by Liu Yingyi/cpanet.org.cn]


Villagers work in a flower field in Diqing Zang autonomous prefecture, Yunnan province, Aug 2, 2020. [Photo by Liang Daming/cpanet.org.cn]


A 9-year-old boy rides on the vast grassland in Bange county, Naqu city, Tibet autonomous region, Aug 6, 2020. [Photo by Liu Lei/cpanet.org.cn]

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2020-10-29 15:10:55
<![CDATA[Visiting China Online:Chongqing]]> http://www.labprosper.com/2020-10/29/content_1485821.htm

[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Largely built on mountains and surrounded by the Yangtze and Jialing rivers, Chongqing is often called the mountain or river city. It's also known as 'China's Hotpot City'. 


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]